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Vitamin D: to take or not to take? What are your thoughts on this gettingstronger post?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 28, 2012 at 5:00 PM

This is the post I am referencing the title. I found it to be a very interesting read, particularly as I currently supplement with Vitamin D. In the article he postulates that low vitamin D levels are a symptom rather than a cause, and that in certain cases supplementing may be counterproductive and/or not the best way to achieve the desired result. What are your thoughts?

D8237966ef014bdec4486ef9f6473894

(93)

on March 07, 2013
at 03:53 PM

Lol brilliant!!!

E7f09005fda1f3ac29ad3718ff4ada3b

on February 17, 2013
at 05:22 AM

There's an interesting update on Todd's blog where he points to the connection between the vitamin D pathway and autophagy, suggesting that some of the benefits of high dose vitamin D supplementation (not bone health, but immune health) can be obtained by turning on autophagy in other ways, like exercise or intermittent fasting: http://gettingstronger.org/2013/02/an-alternative-to-vitamin-d-supplements/

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 28, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Hmm yea, I agree with that. I think I read an article somewhere by Jack Kruse once talking about grains? (I think it was grains) messing up magnesium balance and Vitamin D levels in the blood. So supplementing vitamin D might not be the answer in and of itself, rather just another symptom. Back to cold showers, I started taking cold showers last year which led me then to discover Todd Becker and Jack Kruse afterwards. I haven't taken a warm shower in >11 months now.

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on November 28, 2012
at 06:10 PM

I've been doing the cold showers for a few days now after reading that very post. Big fan of the blog. I think he did state in the article that in certain instances taking vit d can be beneficial, such as in the study you provide, but that simply because your levels are low doesn't not mean it is a good idea, and that you should look for other causes.

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4 Answers

3
0b73cdbd0cb68aeeda14dafeebb2f828

on November 28, 2012
at 09:19 PM

Personally I find it very strange that anyone interested in Paleo living doesn't take seriously what happens to the Vitamin D3 levels of those living now in a way equivalent to that under which human DNA evolved.

Traditionally living populations in East Africa have a mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration of 115 nmol/l. 115nmol/l = 46ng/ml.

I think it's particularly interesting to see what happens naturally to Vitamin D levels during pregnancy and lactation, given the availability of regular sun exposure. Vitamin D status indicators in indigenous populations in East Africa.

Interesting following the May Mellanby link to see this recent Hujoel paper to read. New review associates vitamin D with lower rates of tooth decay

If you don't know Hujoel's work you may be interested in his paper Dietary Carbohydrates and Dental-Systemic Diseases

2
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 28, 2012
at 05:13 PM

Well I want to start off by saying that I'm an avid follower of Todd Becker's blog and I really like his opponenent proccess theory of emotion post and his cold shower post among other things. However, while I seem to understand that the premise he's stating is that Vitamin D deficiency is a symptom of poor health rather than the cause for poor health, and while I do agree with that somewhat. I still think that supplemental Vit D can be a good idea specifically based on an old scientist most people haven't heard of called May Mellanby. This is a clinical setting where Vit D showed positive effects on teeth/cavities in growing children.

Remarks on THE INFLUENCE OF A CEREAL-FREE DIET RICH IN VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM ON DENTAL CARIES IN CHILDREN

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on November 28, 2012
at 06:10 PM

I've been doing the cold showers for a few days now after reading that very post. Big fan of the blog. I think he did state in the article that in certain instances taking vit d can be beneficial, such as in the study you provide, but that simply because your levels are low doesn't not mean it is a good idea, and that you should look for other causes.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 28, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Hmm yea, I agree with that. I think I read an article somewhere by Jack Kruse once talking about grains? (I think it was grains) messing up magnesium balance and Vitamin D levels in the blood. So supplementing vitamin D might not be the answer in and of itself, rather just another symptom. Back to cold showers, I started taking cold showers last year which led me then to discover Todd Becker and Jack Kruse afterwards. I haven't taken a warm shower in >11 months now.

E7f09005fda1f3ac29ad3718ff4ada3b

on February 17, 2013
at 05:22 AM

There's an interesting update on Todd's blog where he points to the connection between the vitamin D pathway and autophagy, suggesting that some of the benefits of high dose vitamin D supplementation (not bone health, but immune health) can be obtained by turning on autophagy in other ways, like exercise or intermittent fasting: http://gettingstronger.org/2013/02/an-alternative-to-vitamin-d-supplements/

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 28, 2012
at 09:15 PM

I supplement on vitamin D since there is no sun in Washington state. I've been low on vitamin D beforehand.

Cause: No sun (like EVER)

Symptom: Vitamn D deficiency

Solution: Supplement on Vitamin D or move to Africa and get milaria

D8237966ef014bdec4486ef9f6473894

(93)

on March 07, 2013
at 03:53 PM

Lol brilliant!!!

0
9c121869346c2442a599dc0e11213bb7

on November 28, 2012
at 08:55 PM

As a woman and autoimmune sufferer I need vitamin D to get through my day. I rely on it for energy and to help prevent osteoporosis. I'm on HRT and young so osteoporosis is a real concern at my age (42). I think it's depends on the individual's needs. A healthy person doing Paleo probably doesn't need it but older women going through menopause and other health issues probably does.

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