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Vitamin D helping with itchy skin rashes! What does this mean?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 04, 2013 at 3:43 PM

For some reason, whenever I am exposed to lengthy periods of sunlight or when I double my daily intake of vitamin D to 20,000 IU, my rashes quickly disappear! (and come back again after a while).
My questions though are:

Why does this happen?

Is this too much vitamin D to take daily? I sincerely hope to not develop hypercalcemia lol.

Thanks

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 08, 2013
at 03:28 PM

I don't take any vitamin A in supplemental form

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 05, 2013
at 12:28 AM

ok. i'm guessing you would have mentioned this already, but just in case, do you happen to take Accutane/Isotretinoin (a form of Vitamin A)

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 05, 2013
at 12:18 AM

My vitamin A is fairly minimal as far as I know. All of my intake is dietary, with offal (such as beef liver) only consumed 1-2 times a week.

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 04, 2013
at 10:30 PM

Good answer, but I truly think it is because the additional immunity boost helped to kill fungus at the site.

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 04, 2013
at 07:45 PM

Thanks for your concern, but I do not see how this answers my question?

  • B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

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3 Answers

best answer

2
50ef4a664144b97faa37430916739309

on September 04, 2013
at 09:30 PM

The intake pathways for Vitamin D (sunlight or oral ingestion) are not identical, which could explain your need to "up" the dosage of oral Vitamin D to get the same effect. This is particularly telling for the treatment of a skin condition, as the oral pathway will naturally have a lower concentration of Vitamin D precursors within direct proximity of the skin.

Vitamin D has two variants/vitamers: D2 (ergocalciferol); and D3 (cholecalciferol). The current usefulness of D2 relative to D3 is unclear, so D3 - cholecalciferol is what people aim for.

With unfiltered sunlight exposure (UVB specifically), cholecaliferol is generated in the skin, in the deeper dermal layers (spinosum & basale). This process is hormetic/self-balancing, so excessive Vitamin D and non-genetic hypercalcemia can not occur for photosynthesised Vitamin D. With oral Vitamin D, what passes through the gut wall in the bloodstream is typically cholecaliferol from ingredients I've failed to trace on the internet.

Cholecaliferol from either source needs to be processed by the liver and kidneys into calcidiol to perform various desirable functions in the body. So the general reasoning is that other than toxicity risks, both oral and photosynthetic origin provide the outcome.

However, you will notice that nothing in the top part of this pathway graph occurs with oral supplementation; at least within the skin. And given our current level of understanding, I wouldn't rule out the possibility of the 7-Dehydrocholesterol precursor being locally bioactive and beneficial in its own right. We certainly know that Cholesterol is important everywhere.

If you can't get enough unfiltered sunlight for various reasons, oral supplementation will still provide your basic Vitamin D needs. But you can see why air and sunlight on skin could be healthy in ways we haven't fully reproduced.


Incidentally, as Vitamin D can be produced by the body - it is actually a hormone and not a vitamin. Vitamin classification itself is an archaic form of classification from the 1920s and 30s; which conveys very little insight about modern biochemistry or the relative value of a molecule to the body. Generally "vitamins" were whichever micro-nutrients that early biochemists could detect, remove and which caused easy-to-see diseases or death. Molecules that could not be treated as an independent variable or whose influence on the body was a more subtle range of below or above-average "happy healthy feelings", were not research and publication candidates in the 1910s, 20s or 30s.

This is part of the reason why you can go into a health supplement aisle and have no clue as to which, if any, of the bottles are worth buying unless you have an obvious disease.

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 04, 2013
at 10:30 PM

Good answer, but I truly think it is because the additional immunity boost helped to kill fungus at the site.

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 04, 2013
at 11:49 PM

Just a thought, is it possible you are getting too much Vitamin A? (if not you can ignore the rest of this).
I mention because Vitamin D is protective against Vitamin A toxicity...so when you increase your Vit D supp &/or sunlight then your Vit A levels drop or are 'offset' (your D/A ratio is 'corrected').

& this is relevant because some of the symptoms of excessive Vitamin A effect the skin...here's a short list from here;
oily skin and hair, itchy or peeling skin, cracked fingernails, skin cracks at the corners of your mouth, mouth ulcers, sensitivity to sunlight,

I know this list is based on toxicity (Hypervitaminosis A), but you may start to see some of these symptoms if your D/A balance starts to gets out of whack.

As i say, the Vit A thing may not be relevant in your case, but worth putting out there, & may give others some clues as well.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on September 05, 2013
at 12:28 AM

ok. i'm guessing you would have mentioned this already, but just in case, do you happen to take Accutane/Isotretinoin (a form of Vitamin A)

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 05, 2013
at 12:18 AM

My vitamin A is fairly minimal as far as I know. All of my intake is dietary, with offal (such as beef liver) only consumed 1-2 times a week.

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 08, 2013
at 03:28 PM

I don't take any vitamin A in supplemental form

0
5661757f5a7ad1d09c44d7b3ce9b533f

on September 04, 2013
at 07:00 PM

Make sure to get your vitamin K2. Vitamin D will help you absorb more calcium; K2 will help your body to place it in your bones instead of your arteries.

http://www.westonaprice.org/fat-soluble-activators/x-factor-is-vitamin-k2#synergy

B120d28d9620626012de121b6075ce51

(134)

on September 04, 2013
at 07:45 PM

Thanks for your concern, but I do not see how this answers my question?

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