2

votes

Vitamin D & Fat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 25, 2010 at 7:33 AM

Came across this post on reddit today, discussing this article, and this comment jumped out at me. Specifically:

Also note that because vitamin D is formed from cholesterol in the skin

So, one could conclude then that a high fat diet + lots of sun exposure + irregular showering (or maybe showering only using water rather than with soaps) will help increase one's vitamin D production.

Thoughts?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 30, 2010
at 02:03 PM

Also, for those of us over 40, up to 90% of the capacity of the skin to make D can be lost as we age. I doubt most of us can get around supplementing...

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 27, 2010
at 03:00 PM

Right, right: I was just saying that the sun is sufficient at those latitudes in the sunny months, not in the winter. The poster seemed to be making a general claim that could have been intended to apply for the whole year.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 27, 2010
at 02:57 PM

Thanks for that, Grace.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on August 26, 2010
at 11:28 PM

WCC Paul -- above the 37th latitude in winter/early spring I've read that UVB is negligible and UVB (not UVA) is the activating wavelength for D synthesis. Chris -- what field of healthcare do you serve (besides D*MN SUPER HAAAAWTNESS)? Great find omg-- I've never come across that yet.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on August 26, 2010
at 11:16 PM

Sorry -- I chopped it...Statins only marginally [if at all] lower CRP and other markers of inflammation. How? Many now suspect that they raise vitamin D, a ubiquitiously active hormone which is potently anti-inflammatory. Rosuvastatin in 8wks raises 25(OH)D (vitamin D) from deficient 14 to 36 ng/ml. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19543962 Vitamin D also raises testosterone -- anecdotally I've noticed and it is justed in our fertility clinic for low sperm count according to my OBGYN. (IF one wants to be chemically castrated -- take a statin.)

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:41 AM

Grace, can you explain your last sentence? A missing word maybe?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:37 AM

But people with dark skin need to be in the sun longer to get the same benefit as people with light skin -- that's the advantage of light skin. So wouldn't that mean in this scenario that their skin would be less oily? Or maybe I'm getting the logic all backwards.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:23 AM

I'm pretty sure you can get enough vitamin D from the sun at pretty much any latitude in the contiguous 48 in the sunny months. Certainly in the two months before and two months after June 21st.

Dc01b84bedac7b06062690e0bddeb920

(346)

on August 25, 2010
at 11:46 PM

wow thanks for that mate, have to have a read

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 25, 2010
at 07:06 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10782041

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 25, 2010
at 04:22 PM

Dietary cholesterol does affect serum cholesterol, there is just an extensive HMG-CoA buffering capability in most people.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 25, 2010
at 04:19 PM

That would be a very poor conclusion to draw based on the evidence you presented, even if it may be correct.

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3 Answers

1
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on August 25, 2010
at 06:57 PM

Dogs lick and groom each other and themselves -- but most primates do not and I think we have lost the vitamin D production that increases levels in sebum. I haven't come across any evidence that showering (immediately) removes vitamin D topically... Vitamin D is synthesized in the skin but is likely immediately shunted into the capillaries into the blood supply.

I've personally increased my cholesterol intake -- bacon egg yolks A LOT and my vitamin D levels stayed the same I've noticed. The only thing that changes the vit D is sunlight (but I'm a tan asian) and taking supplements.

The funny thing about statins (which are evil) are that by blocking HMGCoA, there may be a 'backlog' of cholesterol precursor and this raises vitamin D levels significantly probably secondary to some feedback loop. Many (incl me) , which is potently anti-inflammatory.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:41 AM

Grace, can you explain your last sentence? A missing word maybe?

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on August 26, 2010
at 11:16 PM

Sorry -- I chopped it...Statins only marginally [if at all] lower CRP and other markers of inflammation. How? Many now suspect that they raise vitamin D, a ubiquitiously active hormone which is potently anti-inflammatory. Rosuvastatin in 8wks raises 25(OH)D (vitamin D) from deficient 14 to 36 ng/ml. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19543962 Vitamin D also raises testosterone -- anecdotally I've noticed and it is justed in our fertility clinic for low sperm count according to my OBGYN. (IF one wants to be chemically castrated -- take a statin.)

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 27, 2010
at 02:57 PM

Thanks for that, Grace.

1
Dc01b84bedac7b06062690e0bddeb920

on August 25, 2010
at 08:43 AM

Dietary Cholesterol has zero to no influence of serum cholesterol in your body so, eating high fat diet (although good!) would not help in Vitamin D production (in the way you are thinking).

Sun exposure through the peak periods (10am-2pm) will increase your production of Vitamin D. How much, is a point of debate, and depends on numerous factors. Skin color, geographical position etc. etc.

It is thought that washing does remove Vitamin D, however even just washing with water is said to remove the Vitamin D rich oils produced.

Unless you live in an equatorial climate and sunbake at least once a week, chances are you won't be able to produce enough Vitamin D. The best way is to supplement and get your Vitamin D checked on a yearly basis.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on August 26, 2010
at 11:28 PM

WCC Paul -- above the 37th latitude in winter/early spring I've read that UVB is negligible and UVB (not UVA) is the activating wavelength for D synthesis. Chris -- what field of healthcare do you serve (besides D*MN SUPER HAAAAWTNESS)? Great find omg-- I've never come across that yet.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 25, 2010
at 04:22 PM

Dietary cholesterol does affect serum cholesterol, there is just an extensive HMG-CoA buffering capability in most people.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:23 AM

I'm pretty sure you can get enough vitamin D from the sun at pretty much any latitude in the contiguous 48 in the sunny months. Certainly in the two months before and two months after June 21st.

Dc01b84bedac7b06062690e0bddeb920

(346)

on August 25, 2010
at 11:46 PM

wow thanks for that mate, have to have a read

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 25, 2010
at 07:06 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10782041

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 30, 2010
at 02:03 PM

Also, for those of us over 40, up to 90% of the capacity of the skin to make D can be lost as we age. I doubt most of us can get around supplementing...

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 27, 2010
at 03:00 PM

Right, right: I was just saying that the sun is sufficient at those latitudes in the sunny months, not in the winter. The poster seemed to be making a general claim that could have been intended to apply for the whole year.

0
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on August 26, 2010
at 04:54 AM

Studies have shown that human sebum has a high level of vitamin D in it. Studies also show that vit D reabsorbs effectively through skin. Sooooooo, this is a strong suggestion that human sebum may have a role in vitamin D acquisition. And if you think about it, this makes tons of sense. What it would mean is you can be dark skinned or heavily tanned, and the body can send the sebum/cholesterol out past the dark skin, let it get nuked by the sun and produce D, and then reabsorb it. After all, it can take weeks or months for some people to diminish a heavy summer tan. What if the weather changed rapidly and it suddenly became overcast? Your body would suddenly find it harder to produce D.

This skin oil system would probably already have been in place in our hairy ancestors in order to get past the fur, same as how it works in dogs and cats. If it still had a good use after fur levels lessened, then it would probably still be preserved in modern humans. Ironically, I was reading in some sources that dark skinned people tend to have more oily skin than light skinned people. Also, strong sun tends to cause increased sebum production. Coincidence? Maybe not!

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 26, 2010
at 05:37 AM

But people with dark skin need to be in the sun longer to get the same benefit as people with light skin -- that's the advantage of light skin. So wouldn't that mean in this scenario that their skin would be less oily? Or maybe I'm getting the logic all backwards.

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