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Recommended multivitamin?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 15, 2010 at 4:44 PM

I've been taking AST Multi-Pro 32X multivitamin/mulitmineral for a few years on Ross Enamait's recommendation (recommended for strength athletes with intense training loads).

They're super cheap and I feel good, but I notice that they don't have a ton of vitamin D. Does anyone have any other recommendations or would it pay to add a separate vit D supplement?

60c810b03312675cbe214a543dab9ccc

(0)

on November 16, 2010
at 04:02 AM

There are many bad multi's out there with the "more is better" attitude and often containing poor forms. It's a fact that too much of many vitamins and minerals can be detrimental to health such as Vit. A, and Folic Acid. The body seeks homeostasis. More of a good thing is not always better. Go for safe, quality, balanced multi's such as this http://www.imminst.org/vimmortal to safely supplement a healthy diet.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on July 02, 2010
at 12:18 PM

interesting link--thanks!

9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 16, 2010
at 06:22 PM

The amount of vitamin D made is not proportional to sun exposure; several hours a day in the sun will not greatly increase your Vit. D level. A normal amount of sun/UVB exposure in the course of normal activities (lunch-hour, weekend 'D" will take your D as high as you want it to go. Unless you are inside in the daytime all day seven days a week you are not going to benefit from supplementing D. The evidence against antioxidant, vitamin, and other supplementation has been mounting up inexorably, why would anyone think vitamin D or K will be different?

09a8a986037505ee56d6e30e3c7e3388

(98)

on February 16, 2010
at 03:54 PM

I'm willing to go off multivitamins to see how I feel. But how do I identify all of the deficiencies in my diet? I don't eat fish for example, so I supplement with fish oil. As a desk jockey with a day job, I'm sure I don't get enough sun, so I should get on some vitamin D. I also don't eat organ meat but I'm not sure what I'm missing there.

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:58 PM

Ed, that is a more accurate way to put it

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:31 PM

Acton, It goes a bit too far to say that plant K1 is useless, as it is used to synthesize normal blood clotting proteins in the liver. K1 injections of newborns in the delivery room help prevent strokes and other bleeding problems in young infants. Also, the body converts a small amount of K1 into MK-4 K2, but both synthetic and animal-derived MK-4 K2 are more effective than K1 in promoting vascular health. Cheers,

09a8a986037505ee56d6e30e3c7e3388

(98)

on February 15, 2010
at 07:53 PM

Wow, I've never heard an argument against multivitmains! At worst I thought they were innocuous; At best, helpful to fill in any gaps in the diet. Is anyone else of the same mind as Acton?

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11 Answers

14
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 06:18 PM

Multivitamins are generally not a good idea-- you should only try to correct specific deficiencies in your diet with supplements. These are some problems I see with the formulation of that multi you named:

  • Vitamin A as beta carotene is not efficiently utilized by humans. (Animal fats and organs are much better sources)
  • The jury is out on how much vitamin C is needed. When dietary carbohydrates are low, much less vitamin C is necessary. But large doses (e.g. 200 mg) of vitamin C are counterproductive for athletes. The free radicals produced by exercise are a necessary messenger of the body's signaling, and vitamin C blocks this. 1
  • The vitamin E is all the alpha tocopheryl (the cheapest) form rather than a mixture of the gamma and alpha that the body needs. As with vitamin C, large doses of vitamin E block vital free radical signaling.2
  • The plant form of vitamin K (K1) is all but useless to humans.
  • The B vitamins are all abundant in any sort of animal flesh. There is no reason for supplementing these. There is evidence that taking more than the RDA of folic acid is harmful. 3
  • It does have a decent amount of iodine, which is neglected by many people. There is evidence that the RDA for Iodine is much too low, however. (The Japanese on average consume about 13 mg/day, whereas the RDA is .15 mg.)
  • The other minerals are probably redundant at best. Animal flesh is already abundant in these, and the minerals are present there in active, organic chemical forms.

All in all, if you are worried about vitamin deficiencies, eat animal liver, eat butter oil or vitamin K2 pills, and take at least 5k IU vitamin D3 if you are not getting adequate sun. You may also need to take 400 mg of Magnesium daily.

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:58 PM

Ed, that is a more accurate way to put it

09a8a986037505ee56d6e30e3c7e3388

(98)

on February 16, 2010
at 03:54 PM

I'm willing to go off multivitamins to see how I feel. But how do I identify all of the deficiencies in my diet? I don't eat fish for example, so I supplement with fish oil. As a desk jockey with a day job, I'm sure I don't get enough sun, so I should get on some vitamin D. I also don't eat organ meat but I'm not sure what I'm missing there.

09a8a986037505ee56d6e30e3c7e3388

(98)

on February 15, 2010
at 07:53 PM

Wow, I've never heard an argument against multivitmains! At worst I thought they were innocuous; At best, helpful to fill in any gaps in the diet. Is anyone else of the same mind as Acton?

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on February 15, 2010
at 11:31 PM

Acton, It goes a bit too far to say that plant K1 is useless, as it is used to synthesize normal blood clotting proteins in the liver. K1 injections of newborns in the delivery room help prevent strokes and other bleeding problems in young infants. Also, the body converts a small amount of K1 into MK-4 K2, but both synthetic and animal-derived MK-4 K2 are more effective than K1 in promoting vascular health. Cheers,

9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 16, 2010
at 06:22 PM

The amount of vitamin D made is not proportional to sun exposure; several hours a day in the sun will not greatly increase your Vit. D level. A normal amount of sun/UVB exposure in the course of normal activities (lunch-hour, weekend 'D" will take your D as high as you want it to go. Unless you are inside in the daytime all day seven days a week you are not going to benefit from supplementing D. The evidence against antioxidant, vitamin, and other supplementation has been mounting up inexorably, why would anyone think vitamin D or K will be different?

60c810b03312675cbe214a543dab9ccc

(0)

on November 16, 2010
at 04:02 AM

There are many bad multi's out there with the "more is better" attitude and often containing poor forms. It's a fact that too much of many vitamins and minerals can be detrimental to health such as Vit. A, and Folic Acid. The body seeks homeostasis. More of a good thing is not always better. Go for safe, quality, balanced multi's such as this http://www.imminst.org/vimmortal to safely supplement a healthy diet.

2
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on July 02, 2010
at 09:49 AM

Maybe not a real answer to your question, but this research paper is a good read (and supports the great answer from Acton)

Antioxidants prevent health-promoting effects of physical exercise in humans

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on July 02, 2010
at 12:18 PM

interesting link--thanks!

2
8e606dbf570848c4bc95f98e974a42ca

(312)

on February 15, 2010
at 09:01 PM

I think supplementing is going to be highly specific based on your goals.I think you have to ask yourself where you at where you are you want to be and what your goals are. This should be a principle based endeavour.

I dropped taking all the supplements when I started making the switch to Paleo. What I am taking now is what was recommend by Robb Wolf on his site and through the podcasts. I think I am trying to get the majority of what I need from whole foods, training and sleep. But since I have a significant amount of weight to drop I am taking certain supplements to make up for dietary gaps.

The reason I dropped everything else was I that I like getting as much as I can from whole foods and I want to give a blank canvas to experiment and see what (if any) results were pro or con and tweak from there. So far things are going very well.

The multi I was taking was the Animal Pak along with various other supps. dropped that and am taking the following:

Fish Oil Vitamin D3 Natural Calm Now - Super Enzymes

Did not mean to make this a supp thread but I think it could depend on where you are starting and what your ultimate goals are. I certainly agree with Acton that you should get as much from whole food sources as you can and then go from there.

1
8e606dbf570848c4bc95f98e974a42ca

(312)

on February 15, 2010
at 06:15 PM

For whats it worth. I have been taking the NOW Vitamin D3 gels. 5000I.U. per gel capsule and 240 per bottle and I paid about 18 dollars for the bottle.

Nice to find another Rossite on here!

0
Bdcb4ecc75f7b6867b785a7eadf25ece

on December 18, 2013
at 02:49 PM

Vitamin C isolated hmmmm...

vitamins do not exist as single components in nature they do not act on their own. Vitamins are made up of several different components – enzymes, co-enzymes, and co-factors– that must work together to produce their intended biologic effects, optimally.. Vitamins that are found naturally in whole foods come with all of their necessary components. but processing does casue some loss and degradition, The majority of vitamins that are sold in pharmacies, grocery stores, and vitamin shops are synthetic vitamins, which are only isolated portions of the vitamins that occur naturally in food.not really much good eh ? A good example is vitamin C. If you take a look at a variety of vitamin C supplements, you will find that the majority of them contain only ascorbic acid or a compound called ascorbate, which is a less acidic form of acorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is NOT vitamin C. It represents the outer ring that serves as a protective shell for the entire vitamin C complex, much like an orange peel that serves as a protective shell for an orange. Real vitamin C found in whole foods like fruits and vegetables contain the following components: Rutin Bioflavonoids (vitamin P) Factor K Factor J Factor P Tyrosinase Ascorbinogen Ascorbic Acid When you take only ascorbic acid found in your synthetic vitamin C tablet or powder, your body must gather all of the other components of the full vitamin C complex from your body’s tissues in order to make use of it. In the event that your body does not have adequate reserves of the other components, ascorbic acid itself does not provide any of the health benefits that the full vitamin C complex does. After circulating through your system, the unused ascorbic acid is eliminated through your urine. Just like vitamin C, almost all other vitamins that we know of offer their full health benefits when they are in the presence of a number of enzymes, co-enzymes, co-factors, and even minerals. For example, Vitamin D may have as many as twelve different active components, while vitamin P has at least five different components. The mineral copper is needed for full vitamin C activity, while vitamin E works closely with the mineral selenium to provide its health promoting, anti-oxidative effect. Clearly, it is best to get your vitamins from whole foods because whole foods provide complete vitamins rather than fractions of them. In many cases, whole foods also provide the minerals that are necessary for optimal vitamin activity. For example, sunflower seeds are an excellent whole food source of vitamin E and the mineral selenium, both of which need each other to offer their full health benefits. How do you know if the vitamins on your kitchen counter are from whole foods or if they are synthetic? If the list of ingredients includes an actual vitamin like Vitamin C” rather than an actual food that contains natural vitamin C like “acerola cherry powder”, you can bet that it is a synthetic vitamin. I would stick to bell peppers or the like ..

best to eat lets say a small red bell pepper circa 220 % of recommended vic C in it with many other nutrients too, tastes good too..

0
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

I don't do a multivit -- but try B-vitamins from fermented foods. If I am stressed however for adrenals, I take pantothenic acid, low dose activated B-complex and lots of vitamin C.

Pieter D -- I don't know about that PNAS article... I think what it shows is that Vitamin E and C alone are not enough to supplement...

HERE: the latest greatest from the nutrition and metabolism (low carb, high sat fat, evo/paleo group) shows in vivo that vit C + E, Coenzyme Q10 and SELENIUM

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/pdf/1743-7075-7-55.pdf

Statistically significant: --improve the health of arterial vasculature --lowers BP --raises HDL 'good chol' --lowers Trigs 'bad cholesterol' --lowers Hgba1c 7.1% to 6.3% --[lowers inflammation (hs-CRP(mg/dl) 1.94 to 0.62 p =0.222)]

0
1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 03, 2010
at 01:18 AM

Traditional soup stock made from animal bones and vegetables is a great multivitamin.

0
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 02, 2010
at 12:48 PM

For my two cents I used to take these: http://www.amazon.com/Alive-Multivitamin-Iron-Added-tabs/dp/B00024CS4U

I no longer do, though. On strict paleo the only supp i regularly take is the Natural Calm (although im still tinkering with amounts as my tummy cant handle too much of it) and Organ Delight from Dr. Ron Schmidt: http://www.drrons.com/organ-delight-traditional-superfood.htm

A note: when i took the Alive daily my pee was always bright green. I think someone told me I was just peeing out the extra B vitamins.

In general I would err more along the lines of what Acton posted.

0
Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on July 02, 2010
at 07:47 AM

Trader Joes multi vitamin is whole food based, gluten free and cheap. They also sell inexpensive, gluten free vitamin D3.

0
B35c196e4b69efbada66931d09c36402

on July 02, 2010
at 04:55 AM

Guuuys!

I am searching for a Multi at the moment. I used to take Ori's Multi, MArk Sisson's Multi (too expensive), some certified organic one's which i didn't like as much, etc...

At the moment I am taking only Healthy Origins 5000IU Vitamin D.

I was thinking about Animal Paks, as I am seraching for a NON-Vegan multi! NON-VEgan! I want some Wild game, Fish, Liver, etc..grinded in there to give me some nutrients , besides my diet which is 100% clean (and paleo) again cause I am preparing for a fight.

So which Multi would you recommend?

Regards

0
03591e15b7650ac61d96dd0141427cf0

(355)

on February 16, 2010
at 05:55 AM

Something that I just heard about that sounded interesting on the Livin Low Carb show was Chews 4 Health:

Blockquote Chews-4-Health is a delicious tasting, doctor formulated, natural chewable dietary supplement derived from the most nutrient-rich sources from around the world. It combines current nutritional science with nature’s finest. Chews-4-Health contains 16 ingredients from land and sea, uniting the antioxidant powers of exotic, life-enhancing super fruits with mineral-rich sea vegetables, along with a powerful antioxidant/vitamin blend combined with healthy select fruit concentrates. Compared to many pills and liquids on the market, Chews-4-Health is more convenient, affordable and more quickly absorbed. link text

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