1

votes

How fragile is a vitamin-D molecule?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 05, 2012 at 12:22 AM

How much of salmon's vitamin-D is lost when cooked?

I have heard that the vitamin-D in milk is mostly destroyed by pasteurization, to the extent that such milk is not considered a good source of the vitamin unless it's fortified. Or maybe the destruction of vitamin-D in milk has something to do with homogenization as well? A nefarious synergy perhaps?

Should I eat my salmon raw after it's been frozen for a couple weeks to ensure that I am getting my vitamin-D? How much would a two-week freeze affect the vitamin-D? Does anyone ever eat raw unfrozen salmon?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on November 12, 2012
at 04:26 AM

I would wager his delete-spree is another example of obnoxiousness. He put up bounties on all his questions whenever he got enough reputation to do so, only to turn around and try to delete all of them, rendering the thread nonsensical. It's pretty obnoxious - someone might have gotten some great knowledge from one of the people who answered his question, but without the tags and questions, it's helpfulness is greatly reduced. It seems pretty rude to the community as a whole for their answers, as well as spamming the front page, and especially disrespectful to everyone who answered.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on November 12, 2012
at 04:01 AM

How come you want to delete this question?

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 05, 2012
at 04:08 PM

Agree with Matt. And if you try to get it all from fish these days, you may end up eating more mercury than is safe. Carlson's Solar D Gems are CLO and lanolin-based. No reason to avoid taking supplements, unless you are allergic to the ingredients: beef gelatin, glycerin, sorbitol, water.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:48 AM

I disagree. You might no develop overt deficiency supplementing a tiny bit through foods, but that's nowhere near optimal.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Thermal treatment at 232C is a condition we chemists would call harsh, particularly for fairly complex molecules. Pasteurization is nowhere near that.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on November 05, 2012
at 05:01 AM

Vitamin D is often lost in processed milk because it is defatted, removing the fat soluble vitamins as well.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:07 AM

It just might be possible for one to satisfy one's vitamin-D needs with food alone - sans sun, sans supplement.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I think it just might be possible to get all my vitamin-D from food - sans food, sans supplement.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:44 AM

Thanks for your help!

  • Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

    asked by

    (432)
  • Views
    2.6K
  • Last Activity
    1427D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:40 AM

Vitamin D is not something you get from foods, except in minute amounts that might prevent overt deficiency. You're not going to get optimal levels of vitamin D simply eating salmon and drinking UV-treated (that's how they make it vitamin D fortified) milk.

I wouldn't imagine it's terribly heat-unstable. Care to share a source that shows how heat unstable or stable it really is. After all, you've "heard" things.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:05 AM

I think it just might be possible to get all my vitamin-D from food - sans food, sans supplement.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 05, 2012
at 04:08 PM

Agree with Matt. And if you try to get it all from fish these days, you may end up eating more mercury than is safe. Carlson's Solar D Gems are CLO and lanolin-based. No reason to avoid taking supplements, unless you are allergic to the ingredients: beef gelatin, glycerin, sorbitol, water.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:48 AM

I disagree. You might no develop overt deficiency supplementing a tiny bit through foods, but that's nowhere near optimal.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:07 AM

It just might be possible for one to satisfy one's vitamin-D needs with food alone - sans sun, sans supplement.

Bdc4873264ec9dbec27505e678dabce0

(432)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:44 AM

Thanks for your help!

0
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on November 05, 2012
at 04:10 AM

In "Nutrition in Perspective" by Patricia Kreutler it says that vitamin D is very heat stable.

There's also this study. From the abstract:

"We examined the recovery, distribution, long-term retention, and heat stability of the vitamin in industrially made fortified Cheddar and low-fat cheeses. The results indicated that the vitamin D3 did not degrade during processing, over 1 year of ripening (3−8 °C), or after thermal treatment at 232 °C for 5 min".

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 05, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Thermal treatment at 232C is a condition we chemists would call harsh, particularly for fairly complex molecules. Pasteurization is nowhere near that.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!