0

votes

Modernist cuisine with paleo ingredients

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 08, 2013 at 4:34 AM

Can you have Paleo modernist cuisine? For example, sous-vide cooked steak or coconut milk frozen with liquid nitrogen. Or are the two philosophies so different that they can't co-exist?

Here's a little background on modernist cuisine: http://modernistcuisine.com/books/modernist-cuisine/faqs/

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 11, 2013
at 02:50 PM

Totally agreed. I love roasting salmon, and I don't have a sous vide, but the one time I got to experience it, it was amazing.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 10, 2013
at 02:58 PM

Calling people oddballs in a camp of oddballs takes chutzpah.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:16 PM

Isn't AGAR AGAR just a form similar to gelatin extracted from red seaweed? How is that not paleo?

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

2
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on February 08, 2013
at 04:32 PM

I use sous vide for cooking wild salmon. Theres no other way that get as good results. Less oxidised fat when the fish is vacuumed and cooked at low temp (needs like 45-47C only)

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 11, 2013
at 02:50 PM

Totally agreed. I love roasting salmon, and I don't have a sous vide, but the one time I got to experience it, it was amazing.

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:16 PM

Depends if you're doing paleo in the "What would a caveman eat?" camp or "What does science say about nutrition?" camp. Of course, the caveman approach to paleo, means you'd definitely not be eating molecular gastronomic creations. If you take a more scientific approach to paleo, you probably could eat it - after all, I imagine you're only eating these concoctions on a very occasional basis.

All the gums and salts used to create texture are used in pretty tiny amounts and are non-toxic. Aside from a few oddball folks with SIBO/FODMAPS problems, most people would tolerate these foods just fine. It's worrying about the 1-2% of additives instead of the 98% of food.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 10, 2013
at 02:58 PM

Calling people oddballs in a camp of oddballs takes chutzpah.

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:09 PM

I would say that most would agree that use slow, low heat like sous vide or extreme cold like liquid nitrogen is definitely highly technical and awesome, but doesn't violate the spirit of paleo in any way. The highly processed chemical food products often used, might however. For e.g, it doesn't count as "seaweed" if it's only the highly processed gums.

For sous vide, I would be extremely careful about which bags you use, as they should be plastic free, not just BPA free.

(The nnp article has a linked to suggested bags.)

1
9712e4ce885436e557751cfa6ffedd5a

(488)

on February 08, 2013
at 12:16 PM

I'd think you couldn't use the special thickeners and emulsifiers like agar agar and the like but sous-vide cooking and the use of liquid nitrogen shouldn't clash with a paleo lifestyle/diet.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:16 PM

Isn't AGAR AGAR just a form similar to gelatin extracted from red seaweed? How is that not paleo?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!