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how do you wash your green leafy veggies? wash then cut or cut then wash

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 30, 2012 at 5:14 PM

hi ph,

i use to wash my green leafies one by one and inspected each leaf. as you can imagine, this was VERY time consuming. so i started to cut then wash. what i noticed is that the water turned very green. am i losing nutrients this way? is a lot of the good stuff leeching out into the water?

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on August 30, 2012
at 08:20 PM

carl: the main leafy i cut the most is kale and i think i would go nuts hand tearing them. math: the spinner doenst come out daily but when it does, it gets a beating! its amazing how much water kale holds on to.

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on August 30, 2012
at 08:17 PM

if i had my way, i would do the wash first... but i dont think my 16 mo old would allow me to do that. my first duty is human jungle gym, then wannabe paleo cook. :)

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:09 PM

My salad spinner gets daily use. Excellent on the more tender greens that tend to hold onto water!

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5 Answers

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on August 30, 2012
at 05:42 PM

I never thought about the difference, but I usually tear (not cut) the leaves into my salad spinner. I allow the leaves to soak in cool water for awhile, swish them around a bit, drain and rinse, then take them for spin.

Tearing is supposed to keep the cells of more delicate greens intact, while cutting with a knife cuts through and damages the cells.

@ 6:30 http://youtu.be/D1ly69q7Ik4

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on August 30, 2012
at 08:20 PM

carl: the main leafy i cut the most is kale and i think i would go nuts hand tearing them. math: the spinner doenst come out daily but when it does, it gets a beating! its amazing how much water kale holds on to.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:09 PM

My salad spinner gets daily use. Excellent on the more tender greens that tend to hold onto water!

1
81d5dcf5f86a8bd104a5955ac29fe832

on August 30, 2012
at 05:17 PM

I was always taught to wash then cut, though I have no idea if it makes any difference.

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on August 30, 2012
at 08:17 PM

if i had my way, i would do the wash first... but i dont think my 16 mo old would allow me to do that. my first duty is human jungle gym, then wannabe paleo cook. :)

0
Medium avatar

(3213)

on August 30, 2012
at 06:49 PM

Cut, submerge in iced water (1/2 ice,1/2 water) for 10 minutes, spin dry, voila

This is the way we do it in the restaurant business

0
5e92edc5a180787a60a252a8232006e9

(345)

on August 30, 2012
at 05:40 PM

How about putting in boiling water for 1 minute after you wash and rinse? Favorite technique for washing spinach.

0
E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on August 30, 2012
at 05:28 PM

I soak the whole leaves in warm water for 20 minutes. If the leaves are very buggy (aphids mainly) I will drain them and rinse each leaf. Otherwise I just drain, shake off the water and then chop. Washing or soaking after chopping will leach out some of the nutrients, not a lot of course but still.

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