2

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Best way to prepare veggies

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 22, 2012 at 1:05 PM

Hi, I'm quite new to Paleo, and I have a question about ways of preparing veggies and nutritional benefits. What will be the most beneficial/healthy way to enjoy veggies. Roasted? Fresh? Stir-fried? Cooked?

Thanks!

90bcfafd2ef73fea5398c483c593349e

(872)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:42 PM

Sorry about the link associated with the word, "collards". I did not put it there. It must be some sort of advertisement. It leads to a book about grits! Eek!

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 25, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Update: I also added a handful of chicken hearts and gizzards this time for even more added flavor and nutrients.

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:42 AM

Also incredibly easy. Pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi. "The book" on the subject of home fermentation is "Wild Fermentation" by Sandor Ellix Katz. http://www.wildfermentation.com/

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:40 AM

also incredibly easy to do. Make your pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi.

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:39 AM

Roasting is great, it really brings out a side to broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, tomatoes, brussel sprouts ( I could go on ), that you cant get any other way. Pro tip, if bits of the veggies look like they are burning, then you are doing it right :)

B22965caa0c7a8e7a7c2813ac28ed4fc

(10)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Thanks, usually you hear that any kind of cooking destroys nutrients. Makes more sense they break down/

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7 Answers

3
90bcfafd2ef73fea5398c483c593349e

on December 23, 2012
at 01:08 AM

Dolev, the most nutritious veggies are the ones you eat! As much as us paleo folks want to do everything perfectly with regard to nutrition, variety is paramount. If you were to stick to one "optimal" cooking method, you'd get bored very quickly.

Personally, I like to roast veggies. It's so easy to coat them with your fat of choice and a bit of salt and let 'em rip! The flavor can really be astounding, especially if you add fresh garlic and herbs 5 minutes or so before they're done.

It's also nice to blanch them in soups so they are crisp-tender. I'll also braise greens like collards. Baked stuffed peppers and eggplant are also favorites. Raw veggies in a salad are unbeatable with a crisp glass of white wine on a hot day! Don't forget grilling them over hot coals...as a former vegan, I could go on and on about vegetable preparation, but you get the idea. Have fun with it and know you're doing a good thing for your body regardless of how you cook them.

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:39 AM

Roasting is great, it really brings out a side to broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, tomatoes, brussel sprouts ( I could go on ), that you cant get any other way. Pro tip, if bits of the veggies look like they are burning, then you are doing it right :)

90bcfafd2ef73fea5398c483c593349e

(872)

on December 30, 2012
at 09:42 PM

Sorry about the link associated with the word, "collards". I did not put it there. It must be some sort of advertisement. It leads to a book about grits! Eek!

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 22, 2012
at 01:39 PM

All of the above! It's a balance between making nutrients more bioavailble by breaking down the vegetable and degrading nutrients by cooking.

B22965caa0c7a8e7a7c2813ac28ed4fc

(10)

on December 22, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Thanks, usually you hear that any kind of cooking destroys nutrients. Makes more sense they break down/

1
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:34 AM

Many are okay raw, but as far as cooking goes, Low and slow is the way to go. Make soup or stew so that a lot of the nutrients go into the liquid.

For this winter I've already made three crock pots of chicken soup, and I'm about to make the fourth tomorrow. I only use a few chicken leg quarters with a ton of veggies, a little bit of salt and pepper. Simple good stuff.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 25, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Update: I also added a handful of chicken hearts and gizzards this time for even more added flavor and nutrients.

1
35b2cb4d450e5288895c255dfdfff35d

(5828)

on December 22, 2012
at 06:25 PM

Fermented veggies have lots of nutrients.

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:42 AM

Also incredibly easy. Pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi. "The book" on the subject of home fermentation is "Wild Fermentation" by Sandor Ellix Katz. http://www.wildfermentation.com/

61848fb3934eb0f08abacf0b920bf81b

(225)

on December 24, 2012
at 04:40 AM

also incredibly easy to do. Make your pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi.

0
00a629ca51e90b938342667ba829700f

on December 23, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Fermtation is the best way to prepare them. End of conversation.

0
A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on December 22, 2012
at 08:27 PM

It doesn't really matter how you prepare them but steaming would be the mildest way.

0
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 22, 2012
at 08:05 PM

As a bed to catch the fat drippings from the bone in fatty meat of your choice.

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