4

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Paleo Babies: breastfeeding infant is terribly gassy

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 14, 2012 at 8:07 PM

I am a fish-a-tarian trying to transition to eating more meat, mainly chicken right now. My partner is paleo-leaning, and eventually I'd like to be able to cook just one meal for the both of us.

My problem right now is that I'm breastfeeding, and my son has terrible, really uncomfortable gas. I don't. For instance, last night I ate asparagus and tilapia. This morning he's been terribly gassy and irritable.

Wondering if there's any paleo+breastfeeding wisdom here.

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on March 15, 2012
at 04:32 PM

And what is this going to tell you? C-section can contribute to gut dysbiosis, but so can any number of other things. It's good to know this from a prevention standpoint, but at this point it seems an unnecessarily invasive question.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 14, 2012
at 09:02 PM

Someone in another of the nursing threads suggested this article at WAPF: http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/diet-for-pregnant-and-nursing-mothers Hope it helps some. Are you using garlic, onions, spices, or FODMAPs? Just trying to think of what often causes gas.

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8 Answers

best answer

0
52d337fac29e1f3a9b9c49765d5da283

on March 14, 2012
at 08:48 PM

There are so many things that can upset a little ones tummy while breastfeeding. I have a great product we use it is all natural and works wonders for these symptoms it's called"gripe water" it's kind of like a tea for a baby in a way. But is given through a dropper. Also try a warm compress and a warm relaxing bath.;)

best answer

4
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on March 14, 2012
at 08:42 PM

How old is baby? My son reacted to cruciferous vegetables my first few weeks but once he learned how to pass gas it subsided. I wouldn't cut them out. It's really important to get lots of vitamin k, which your mammary glands change to k-2 for the baby. Another problem we were having was engorgement. If you're super full baby can get mostly foremilk Instead of the fattier hind milk which can make them gassy. Are his poops green or curdy yellow? If consistently green it could be a foremilk issue and a little block feeding will take care of that. Other than that just bicycle his legs and put some pressure on his belly. Letting them drape across your forearm or breastfeed face down while you lie on your back can help too. Make sure you're burping him every 15 minutes or so during a feed, it'll help a lot.

Obviously eating a nutrient dense diet is really important but unless he's getting rashes or other allergic reactions I wouldn't go nuts cutting stuff out of your diet for the elusive "perfect" combination of foods. Sometimes you'll think you found out what it was 4 weeks later and cut something like dairy or shellfish out and the only real change was that they got older and the latch got better. Kellymom.com is a really good resource for breastfeeding information. http://www.kellymom.com/babyconcerns/gassybaby.html

Good luck!!

best answer

2
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on March 14, 2012
at 11:27 PM

Look up the list of FODMAPs foods and limit those (or use trial and error to figure out which are most bothersome). Asparagus is on that list and is a killer for me.

4
E5d0722c4b4af387287f9947eb96b800

(160)

on March 14, 2012
at 08:17 PM

i would stay away from all cabbages and gas producing foods--may not affect you but will affect baby

3
8292546789ca48c32ead34c6e884d059

on March 14, 2012
at 10:40 PM

Is the little one getting a good latch? Sometimes little ones gulp air while nursing.

1
0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on March 14, 2012
at 08:20 PM

baby response can be related to different things for different people. Do you drink coffee or caffeinated tea? Some babies don't react well to that. For me, it was definitely dairy, not sure what else. Keep a log of what you eat and drink, and what your baby reacts to. Did you have onions or garlic in your food last night? Any herbs? Any nuts or fruit for a snack?

0
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on March 15, 2012
at 04:23 PM

With my baby, gassiness was a sign of a food sensitivity, and it can happen from really random things that you wouldn't think would be a culprit.

Her first Thanksgiving (1 month old), she got gassy from turkey that I ate (definitely the turkey - this was confirmed on more than one future occasion). Her second Thanksgiving, she broke out in hives from turkey. We're now planning on alternative meat for future Thanksgivings.

Similar happened with some other foods.

On the other hand, she has no problems with most typical gas-causing foods (cabbage, onions, etc.).

So basically, you have two choices. If the gassiness is mild and doesn't seem to cause significant discomfort or sleep disruption, you can ignore it and hope for the best. If the gassiness is a real problem, it's probably best to track down the culprit and eliminate it from your diet.

0
0a0afca93a127c82ec4192a2e99647f4

on March 15, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Was baby vaginal birth or c-section?

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on March 15, 2012
at 04:32 PM

And what is this going to tell you? C-section can contribute to gut dysbiosis, but so can any number of other things. It's good to know this from a prevention standpoint, but at this point it seems an unnecessarily invasive question.

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