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Living&Eating with Vegetarians

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 07, 2012 at 12:36 AM

Hi Paleohacks, I'm back for another semester of college! With a collage of my food issues, stress levels, social factors and desire to be Primal

I am living a co-op (which is lots of fun) with mostly vegetarians. Lunch and dinner are supplied every day, although sometimes we run out of food. Tasty baked goods are often around but I need to avoid them because I respond badly to gluten.

How do I make sure I am getting enough protein and eating healthfully in this environment? Is 75g of protein per day enough to preserve muscle mass? That's what I could get if I eat each day the following:

  • 1 can sardines
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 oz cheese
  • 1 cup yogurt or milk with whey protein powder
    • whatever the co-op serves me for lunch and dinner (beans, vegetables, rice/potatoes cooked with veg oil)

Unfortunately they use a lot of canola oil, but I can supplement omega-3s.

Other add-ins I that could purchase from a store in town, but seem like a very tempting waste of money: coconut, coconut butter nuts of all kinds, kombucha, avocados, pastured meats+bacon, chocolate, various protein/energy bars, dried fruit.

What should my routine be? How can I stop gobbling chocolate out of frustration when I'm late to dinner and the co-op runs out of kale? Is the canola oil a problem? Can you remind me why it's a bad idea to rely on Clif Builder Bars and Luna Bars for supplemental protein? Can I really skip breakfast and fast until lunch with no ill effects?

Thanks Paleohacks!!

Aacabe21bcb2c8a5a15717d60447c1f4

(144)

on September 07, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Thank you! That's really reassuring. I have no idea how most vegetarians get enough protein.

34cf7065a6c94062c711eb16c0f6adc3

on September 07, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Would add the protein debate from exrx.net forum. http://exrx.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=4007 . Dr. Phillips argues that .8gms/kg/day is more than enough for maintenance, and 1.4gms/day provides maximal muscle growth. Also See http://www.kriswragg.co.uk/pdf/9898.pdf Protein should never be above 35% of your total energy intake, otherwise it has negative effects on muscle growth. Also best time to take protein is immediately after exercise, and possibly even before the exercise.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 07, 2012
at 01:53 AM

That's funny...I read Living with and Eating Vegetables.

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5 Answers

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 07, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Are you allowed to do any of your own cooking there?

If you do ever plan to spend money on food at the store in town, you don't have to limit yourself to Clif and Luna bars and wacky stuff like that. (Mostly soy protein isolate and all kinds of crazy additives, stabilizers, etc.) Why not just buy meat, eggs, and other real food? Even if it's not grassfed/pastured, you're better off.

Depending on your body size (and activity level/strength goals, if any), 75g protein/day could well be enough. (Would be a different story if you were lifting heavy and trying to add muscle mass.)

1
6d64cd6dc98d6ab763bd03678a317964

(2177)

on September 07, 2012
at 01:49 AM

When I saw your question I seriously read it as Living & Eating Vegetarians...

Anyways, protein requirements actually aren't that high. Brad Pilon has weighed in on this extensively in his book "How Much Protein" (Full text on request). A relevant quote from his blog:

In a research trial conducted on people who were over 50 years old and had chronic renal insufficiency (real bad kidneys) researchers explored the idea that resistance training could counteract the low protein diets that these people had to be on because of their medical condition.

On average these subject were eating under 0.3 grams of protein per pound of body weight. To put that into perspective, a 180 pound man would be eating about 50 grams of protein per day! For 12 weeks!

So what the researchers were thinking was ???since these people were on such low protein diets, for extended periods of time, muscle loss is definitely a risk. However, maybe if we made them weight train, we could prevent this from happening???.

At the end of the study, the subject working out 3 times per week maintained there body weight, while the group that was not lifting weights lost about 7 pounds.

The group lifting weights also saw increases in muscle strength and muscle size.

This study is a great example of people actually gaining muscle size on a low protein diet as a result of resistance training.

http://bradpilon.com/weight-loss/how-much-protein-do-we-really-need-to-eat/

Ned Kock has also weighed in:

Wilson & Wilson (2006) conducted an extensive review of the literature on protein intake and nitrogen balance. That review suggests that a protein intake beyond 25 percent of what is necessary to achieve a nitrogen balance of zero would have no effect on muscle gain. That would be 69 g/d for a person weighing 100 lbs (45 kg); 105 g/d for a person weighing 155 lbs (70 kg); and 136 g/d for someone weighing 200 lbs (91 kg). For the reasons explained above, these are also overestimations.

http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/12/how-much-protein-does-one-need-to-be-in.html

So if you are not calorie or carb restricted then your 72g of protein per day will just barely (in my opinion) be enough. I'd shoot for 100g per day if at all possible. In Brad's book he concludes that 120g for most people is adequate.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 07, 2012
at 01:53 AM

That's funny...I read Living with and Eating Vegetables.

Aacabe21bcb2c8a5a15717d60447c1f4

(144)

on September 07, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Thank you! That's really reassuring. I have no idea how most vegetarians get enough protein.

34cf7065a6c94062c711eb16c0f6adc3

on September 07, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Would add the protein debate from exrx.net forum. http://exrx.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=4007 . Dr. Phillips argues that .8gms/kg/day is more than enough for maintenance, and 1.4gms/day provides maximal muscle growth. Also See http://www.kriswragg.co.uk/pdf/9898.pdf Protein should never be above 35% of your total energy intake, otherwise it has negative effects on muscle growth. Also best time to take protein is immediately after exercise, and possibly even before the exercise.

0
Fa31aa9f354625c33c0807379c584d65

on September 07, 2012
at 06:09 PM

If you can I would definitely try to get them to switch over to a different oil. Maybe you could talk them into olive oil or coconut oil. Supplementing with Omega 3s is okay but it's much better if your omega 3: omega 6 ratios are naturally balanced.

As far as late night cravings, I would guess your not eating enough fat. Try to eat an extra egg or take a tablespoon of coconut oil to keep yourself sated.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 07, 2012
at 12:46 AM

rule of thumb, 1g protein for every 1 - 1.5 lb of lean body mass. A 140 lb woman @ 20% BF would need around 115g of protein.

Use fitday.com to track your intake.

-1
F71bde2e9f4c1601a0b8730d4e9a68c1

on February 11, 2013
at 11:01 AM

Hello,

You should not skip your breakfast and it must be in your regular routine. However you are asking about protein requirement for the body and to know the exact amount you can read the blog at Sheffa foods website which has relevant information for your query.

Proteins help in vital functions in our body, which are tissue growth and repair. Yes it's a bad idea to rely on cliff builder bars or any other supplements to gain extra protein. Instead, we should consume protein rich foods to ensure that essential amino acids are supplied to the body.

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