5

votes

What is the best vegetable?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 11, 2011 at 3:34 AM

What is the best vegetable that is okay to eat large quantities of? And why? Take into consideration its calories (probably insignificant), micronutrients, any possible toxins, and taste.
I love veggies and enjoy eating them as a side with meat. The veggies I eat on a regular basis are asparagus (asparagi for plural? just kidding.), broccoli, spinach and bell peppers. Occasionally onions, carrots, cauliflower and tomatoes. I don't have a reason for eating these besides they taste good.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on December 21, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Spinach is a no-no for histamine intolerant people too...

6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:13 PM

now I'm starting to question life.

F3fc2e0a9577e7e481a387d917904d1e

(1070)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:43 PM

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=250

D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d

on November 11, 2011
at 01:15 PM

Spinach is pretty high in oxalic acid which affects absorption of dietary calcium. Kinda demonstrates Matt's point.

Ed92809f18ca70e360768b4f2c9c9df6

(356)

on November 11, 2011
at 07:41 AM

why the uncertainty? =P

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13 Answers

16
E639bc85fd42430285596434a6515ad5

(2226)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:43 AM

Is bacon a vegetable?

6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:13 PM

now I'm starting to question life.

Ed92809f18ca70e360768b4f2c9c9df6

(356)

on November 11, 2011
at 07:41 AM

why the uncertainty? =P

14
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 11, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Best to eat a variety and seasonally. You can indict most veggies one way or another. Talking about anti-nutrients, as with anything: the dose makes the poison.

6
D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d

on November 11, 2011
at 01:21 PM

I'm a big believer in the health benefits of crucifers aka brassicas (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, turnips, etc.) -- they're loaded with vitamins, indoles, and other good stuff. If I was in some hypothetical situation where I had to pick one group of veggies, that's probably what I'd go with. But in large quantities, they can negatively affect thyroid function, they interact with metabolism of some drugs, etc.

Variety's where it's at.

F3fc2e0a9577e7e481a387d917904d1e

(1070)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:43 PM

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=250

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 11, 2011
at 03:41 AM

Sorry, can't narrow it to one. Why would I want to?

I eat lots of rich dark leaf lettuce and cukes and celery. I also eat a lot of onion. The other veggies I eat frequently are cabbage, asparagus, broccoli and cauliflower. Sweet potato is an occasional.

3
0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on November 11, 2011
at 04:43 AM

+1 to Matt. For example, asparagus is discouraged for people prone to gout. Excessive spinach consumption can contribute to kidney stones. But, in moderation, both are nutritious.

2
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 11, 2011
at 08:39 AM

Sauerkraut is an all-in-one.

2
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on November 11, 2011
at 06:38 AM

I don't see any reason to go beyond the sweet potato.

2
D117467bf8e8472464ece2b81509606c

(2873)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:08 AM

I eat spinach, eggplant, onions, peppers, and green beans but I feel like spinach is the healthiest of the bunch... it's really green, there's very little sugar, it ain't a nightshade, and its nowhere near to being a legume.

D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d

on November 11, 2011
at 01:15 PM

Spinach is pretty high in oxalic acid which affects absorption of dietary calcium. Kinda demonstrates Matt's point.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on December 21, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Spinach is a no-no for histamine intolerant people too...

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:28 PM

Spinach for the win. Very high in folate AND betaine, vitamin K, carotenes, and chlorophyll.

I also like brussel sprouts a lot, both for taste and health. Although they contain less bang for the buck than spinach, they are a crucifer and so provide isothiocyanates which are probably good.

1
40b9b96f7304e40d69f9d7a1bd87f7ea

(80)

on November 11, 2011
at 11:35 AM

zuchini, red bell peppers, brocolli, leek,

0
C1b0395fd93358f8cb55a63528d61461

on June 13, 2013
at 10:19 PM

Any discussion of paleo-friendly vegetables that mentions peppers and other nightshades (peppers, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, goji, tobacco) without mentioning the potential harmful effects of glyco-alkaloids is doing a diservice.

0
75695cbf01535756d4e0c36dee24693e

on December 21, 2011
at 08:08 PM

I really like sweet potato leaves, guava leaves (which I ate in the highlands of Vietnam) and tapioca leaves (often cooked in coconut). All are high in anti-oxidants. I eat these everytime I see them in a vegetable rice stall (not vegetarian)

I also eat bitter gourd/melon-a fruit actually. They are said to be excellent in vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6 and C) and minerals (zinc, phosphorus, manganese, magnesium and iron). They are said to have twice the calcium of spinach and twice the potassium of a banana. The carbohydrates are low and the dietary fibre is high. They are said the be good for diabetes and toxaemia because of their phyto chemical compounds (phyto-nutrient, polypeptide-P (insulin-like)) and (hypoglycemic agent called charantin-said to increase glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in the cells of liver, muscle and adipose tissue). There are a lot of websites with info on the bitter gourd/melon. I am hoping there will be more scientific tests on it. As there are also some toxic concerns, mostly from traditional sources. The exact effects on the liver have not yet been studied. You can check the USDA nutrient constituent values of raw bitter gourd: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ Although its quite bitter I have been eating for the past 15 years.

0
Medium avatar

on November 11, 2011
at 04:49 AM

Celery. Didn't you get the memo?

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