5

votes

How much and what type of greens do you eat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 28, 2013 at 6:48 PM

I've never liked vegetables a whole lot, but recently I've included more greens, like lettuce on top of my dairy and meat with nice results. Meat and dairy by themselves never worked too great for me In bulk, but adding salad greens on top seems to make a difference. I'm thinking it's because of the hydro colloidal properties of lettuce helping with digestion or something, but that's just a dart at a dart board. So how much and what kind of greens do you eat?

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:39 PM

i forgot to add all the wild edibles that are amazing. MALLOW-so great in soups or chopped up in corn salad, its very high in magnesium DANDELION-great in salads, if you can get the little heart of it right before the flowers sprout its an amazing treat WILD MUSTARD-way less spicey then regular mustard leaves, great as a pesto or sauted with eggs CHICKWEED-has a really sweet taste on its own, great for salad i am probably forgetting something! oh also nasturium leaves are super spicey and great for wrapping around avocado

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:36 PM

cooked romaine is delicious, the other more bitter lettuce family greens, raddichio, endive and dandelion are also really tasty sauteed, they mellow out a bit. i like to add a little dulse and pepper, garlic, ginger and red wine vinegar

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:33 PM

i love them, during the season i pretty much survive on pesto....o pesto!

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:16 PM

I was advised to cook all my veg since I have digestive issues. And romaine is one of the few vegs that don't give me gas - I used to make wraps with it. So I figured I'd cook it and see how that goes.

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:10 PM

Who cares about culinary, I thought this was a science forum. Yeah you can eat those leaves, 1 full kilo (2 pounds or whatever) of lettuce leaves will provide you with a whoopin 140 kcalories, that is if you digest that much of it, which I doubt

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:07 PM

Then you're under the wrong impression. They're all cellulose which is undigestable by humans but not by ruminants

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:56 PM

Then you're under the wrong impression. They are all cellulose which is undigestable by humans but not by ruminants. You might as well eat grass from your garden

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on March 01, 2013
at 01:25 PM

Never thought of cooking romaine, renee. What made you cook it the first time? I'm going to try it. Love finding something new here!

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on March 01, 2013
at 01:04 PM

Peas are actually a legume, which is not totally "on plan" for Paleo, though I agree that they are yummy and fairly nutritious. But I eat them infrequently because I have issues with legumes.

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on March 01, 2013
at 11:41 AM

"here's no reason to eat leafy greens since they are not digestable by humans" - wrong. You're a primate and all primates eat leaves.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:34 AM

Oh wow you eat a ton of greens

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:33 AM

I was under the impression that leafy greens, like what you'd find in a quality salad are actually pretty low in fibre

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on February 28, 2013
at 10:54 PM

I'm gonna have to give this guy a +1 for making me look up the definitions of "fruit" and "vegetable". I don't understand the second statement, though. Maybe he means "grass" rather than "leafy greens"? I truly despise the K-12 and university brainwash for not having taught such basic things.

22ed067dfadf3ce563b2f0b9f8bf70bb

(92)

on February 28, 2013
at 09:54 PM

Botanically yes, culinary no x

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 28, 2013
at 07:04 PM

Pod peas or the seed? I'm always looking for more choline.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 28, 2013
at 07:02 PM

added tags.....

  • Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

    asked by

    (10979)
  • Views
    2.2K
  • Last Activity
    1436D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

19 Answers

best answer

3
2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

on February 28, 2013
at 09:39 PM

O GREENS!

RAW: romaine lettuce(i can easily eat 3 heads a day, i am spoiled, i work on organic farms), arugula, cilantro, parsley, basil, fennel, dill, radichio, endive, red cabbage, maybe baby spinach...for the herbs i can eat a ton, espeically fennel and dill, 6 cups worth, too much of anything else and its gas and loose stools.

COOKED: kale, collards, spinach, chard, turnip greens, brocolli greens, green cabbage, brussels sprouts......always cooked to get rid of oxalates....i hardly eat this stuff even when its abundant in the field. maybe maybe ill snack on a few baby kale leafs or stems raw....maybe.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:33 PM

i love them, during the season i pretty much survive on pesto....o pesto!

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:39 PM

i forgot to add all the wild edibles that are amazing. MALLOW-so great in soups or chopped up in corn salad, its very high in magnesium DANDELION-great in salads, if you can get the little heart of it right before the flowers sprout its an amazing treat WILD MUSTARD-way less spicey then regular mustard leaves, great as a pesto or sauted with eggs CHICKWEED-has a really sweet taste on its own, great for salad i am probably forgetting something! oh also nasturium leaves are super spicey and great for wrapping around avocado

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:34 AM

Oh wow you eat a ton of greens

3
Medium avatar

on February 28, 2013
at 07:01 PM

My go-to vegetables these days are steamed peas. Good source of choline and folate (and most everything else, actually: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2521/2 ) Love them with a bit of salt.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 28, 2013
at 07:04 PM

Pod peas or the seed? I'm always looking for more choline.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on March 01, 2013
at 01:04 PM

Peas are actually a legume, which is not totally "on plan" for Paleo, though I agree that they are yummy and fairly nutritious. But I eat them infrequently because I have issues with legumes.

3
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 28, 2013
at 06:59 PM

Personally I eat lots of greens and try to get at least one or two servings of cooked and one to two raw a day. I like/eat anything - collards with ham, turnip greens, mustard, kale, arugula, spinach, claytonia, lettuces, on and on. Good stuff, nutrient dense, tasty to me.

That said, greens are probably not a necessity. A good alternative would be making sure to get plenty of animal organ meats, bone broth, and marrow. Eat nose to tail. A lot of the same nutrients that are in greens are in animals, but not to any extent in the straight muscle meat that most of us are used to eating.

If you don't like liver, eat your greens. (I can hear my grand mom talking)

2
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:17 AM

One thing I've discovered is how good romaine is sauteed. I always thought of it as a "cold" veg, as in salad, but it's great in bacon fat or coconut oil, and mixed with other sauteed greens like spinach, chard and bok choy.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:16 PM

I was advised to cook all my veg since I have digestive issues. And romaine is one of the few vegs that don't give me gas - I used to make wraps with it. So I figured I'd cook it and see how that goes.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 03, 2013
at 10:36 PM

cooked romaine is delicious, the other more bitter lettuce family greens, raddichio, endive and dandelion are also really tasty sauteed, they mellow out a bit. i like to add a little dulse and pepper, garlic, ginger and red wine vinegar

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on March 01, 2013
at 01:25 PM

Never thought of cooking romaine, renee. What made you cook it the first time? I'm going to try it. Love finding something new here!

2
2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on February 28, 2013
at 07:02 PM

I generally eat veggies with every meal. For one meal a day, I usually eat a huge salad with lettuce, spinach, mushrooms, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc and then top it with a couple hard boiled eggs and some italian dressing. For dinner, I eat tuna, steak, or chicken with a large side of veggies and a potato. I loveee greens and feel best when I eat most of my diet in vegetables.

2
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 28, 2013
at 06:58 PM

Raw, my favorites are Romaine lettuce and shredded Brussels sprouts. I like kale, collard, and mustard greens cooked, but they can be bitter if harvested too late or not cooked properly. I include some veg with every evening meal, either raw or cooked. I'll toss broccoli or Brussels sprouts in melted coconut oil, butter or olive oil (enough to make the seasoning stick), season with whatever sounds good, then roast in a 400* oven until browned. The florets of the broccoli get slightly crunchy and the Brussels sprouts are crunchy on the outside and tender on the inside (the texture of perfectly cooked French fries). It helps my digestion to have a veg included, but I've never given much thought to why.

1
Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on March 01, 2013
at 11:39 AM

Leaves: spinach, chard, rocket, watercress

Vegetables: tenderstem broccoli, purple sprouted broccoli, asparagus, sugar snap peas

I eat an assorted mixture of this sort of stuff pretty much every day, and I love it. Hard to say exactly how much - a heaped plate full?

1
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on March 01, 2013
at 08:22 AM

If we're just talking about vegetables of the colour green...

The main leafy green I eat is spinach. It's the most nutrient-dense. I also eat kale, and sometimes romaine if there's nothing else. Never iceberg. That's basically just water.

As well as my leaves, I eat plenty of cucumber, zucchini and celery.

As for cooked greens: broccoli and brussels sprouts.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 28, 2013
at 11:49 PM

Get yourself to a farmer's market and let the farmers tell you about the greens they are selling, the best way to prepare them, etc. Smell, touch and taste. Try something new at least once a month--as different things come into season you can experiment with what's cheap and plentiful. Make it a fun exploration!

As the sugar and processed foods fell away from my diet, greens tasted better and better to me. I never liked swiss chard and kale very much before, now I love them. One new one to us is sorrel--yummy!

Play with preparation methods--steamed, stir fried, baked (kale chips, YUM!), braised in bone broth (delicious!), creamed (use coconut milk if you're dairy free),lightly steamed kale in a salad with a garlicky dressing, etc.

A whole new world!

1
9712e4ce885436e557751cfa6ffedd5a

(488)

on February 28, 2013
at 11:31 PM

Broccoli and kale. I cook them up the same way. Saut??ed in bison tallow and or coconut oil with finely chopped garlic until wilted in the case of kale or slightly browned in the case of broccoli. then I add bison bone broth and balsamic vinegar with salt, black pepper, fennel seeds, rosemary, and anise seeds and cook until the mixture is reduced.

I have this about every 1.5 days on average I'd say, sometimes every day, sometimes every other day, Depends what else I have to eat at home.

When I do this it's a meal and a half for me though as I cook up an inordinate amount of broccoli or kale at once.

1
32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on February 28, 2013
at 09:37 PM

I love kale. It's the ultimate paleo convenience food. I heat about 2 tsp bacon grease in a skillet, and throw in 3 cups kale. (From the pre washed and pre chopped but not organic bag of it). Saute for a few minutes and done! It's one of my favorite breakfasts, and gives me very good steady energy.

1
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on February 28, 2013
at 09:22 PM

i dont eat any leafy green veggies. im trying to heal my gut and read that insoluble fiber is basically the devil. i used to it up to a lb a day but have since cut all of that out.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:33 AM

I was under the impression that leafy greens, like what you'd find in a quality salad are actually pretty low in fibre

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:07 PM

Then you're under the wrong impression. They're all cellulose which is undigestable by humans but not by ruminants

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 02:56 PM

Then you're under the wrong impression. They are all cellulose which is undigestable by humans but not by ruminants. You might as well eat grass from your garden

1
5616e8de3e99ae199d9fd896098a331a

on February 28, 2013
at 08:27 PM

All that chopping and rinsing bores me to death. Thank god there is roquefort and I can eat something green effortlessly.

1
22ed067dfadf3ce563b2f0b9f8bf70bb

on February 28, 2013
at 07:28 PM

I love veggies and eat a very large salad daily with lunch made with romaine lettuce, cucumber, red peppers, tomatoes and sauerkraut.

Dinner always has a hearty portion of vegetables and that is currently zucchini, eggplant, mushrooms etc.

Peace x

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on February 28, 2013
at 07:06 PM

I eat broccoli and asparagus, mostly. The asparagus I steam and the broccoli I eat raw or steamed. I also eat mixed salad greens too. In total I eat about 1-2 servings of salad greens and 1-2 servings of steamed greens, for a total of 2-4 servings of greens per day. (A serving is however much I feel like at the time. 1-2 handfuls = 1 serving).

I eat green herbs- parsley, dill, mint, cilantro, etc. Celery sometimes as well.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on August 16, 2013
at 01:25 AM

There is a season for all. In the Midwest, lettuce is best in the spring and early summer, then chard peaks, then whole beet (greens and root), beans (borderline greens). In the Fall broccoli, arugula, napa, and some other brassica (pak choi, tatsoi) are at their best. Radicchio is for after freezes, and kale and collard for deep winter. I have 4 beds of kale and 4 beds of collards, and they will all be eaten. Dandelions in spring and Fall will keep your liver in good shape. There is nothing that compares to greens in phytochemicals, folate, magnesium, and calcium (if you do not eat dairy).

0
A2b36cd9592edaf0b7b2752ce23a2e1a

on August 15, 2013
at 10:51 PM

Daily: Spinach and Kale

I rotate in lettuce, broccoli, and asparagus

0
50db4931551dca815b6d67cc84dad26d

on August 15, 2013
at 10:34 PM

Go To cziebart.Myitworks.Com And Drink Your Greens. It's Called Greens And It DeTo ox's You And Gives 8+ servIngs A Day And Makes You Ph Balance.

-1
Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

on February 28, 2013
at 09:18 PM

cucumber, red peppers, tomatoes, eggplant and zucchini are NOT vegetables, they are FRUITS

There's no reason to eat leafy greens since they are not digestable by humans, rather by ruminants and such

22ed067dfadf3ce563b2f0b9f8bf70bb

(92)

on February 28, 2013
at 09:54 PM

Botanically yes, culinary no x

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on March 01, 2013
at 11:41 AM

"here's no reason to eat leafy greens since they are not digestable by humans" - wrong. You're a primate and all primates eat leaves.

Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

(192)

on March 01, 2013
at 03:10 PM

Who cares about culinary, I thought this was a science forum. Yeah you can eat those leaves, 1 full kilo (2 pounds or whatever) of lettuce leaves will provide you with a whoopin 140 kcalories, that is if you digest that much of it, which I doubt

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on February 28, 2013
at 10:54 PM

I'm gonna have to give this guy a +1 for making me look up the definitions of "fruit" and "vegetable". I don't understand the second statement, though. Maybe he means "grass" rather than "leafy greens"? I truly despise the K-12 and university brainwash for not having taught such basic things.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!