4

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Goitrogenic foods--how much is too much?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 06, 2012 at 5:49 PM

"Goitrogenic foods???which interfere with thyroid function???include cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, mustard, turnips, rutabaga, and cabbage, as well as soy products and millet. Strawberries, peaches, and spinach are also somewhat goitrogenic. You don???t have to give up these foods completely (crucifers in particular have some great anti-cancer compounds), but definitely scale back on them if they???re currently a large part of your diet, especially if you already have hypothyroid symptoms." --Denice Minger

I currently eat about 600 calories of steamed vegetables (especially brussel sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli). I LOVE steamed vegetables; but is this too much? I am a 21-year old woman, 5'9", 145lbs. I'd like to get down to 135lbs (my racing weight) and veggies help a lot to scale back on calories. But if having too many of these vegetables will disrupt my thyroid function, then that's not good...any advice? Ideas? Am I overdoing it?

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on September 01, 2014
at 02:41 PM

On the one hand, you have Dr. Chris Masterjohn saying that crucifers suppress thyroid function.  On the other hand, you have Dr. Sarah Ballantyne saying that she has ffound anything in the scientific literature that supports so-called goitrogenic foods harming the thyroid.  I'd like to reconcile the two viewpoints.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Mind you if you have a high iodine intake (lots of eggs for example), it probably is more helpful than harmful. Lots of people with hyperthyroid find it useful to delibrately eat lots of these foods, and if you have high iodine intake, or use coconut oil, its possible your thyroid could use slowing down. An area I am only just learning about myself...

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 12:59 AM

bok choy is another goitrogenic food, lol. But yeah, cooking removes alot of it, so try and cook the heck out of them would be by advice. And if you have iodine foods, like fish, dairy, cranberry, eggs, try and eat them seperately as foods.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on August 06, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Just ran the numbers on this. If you were eating only steamed Brussels sprouts (the highest calorie of those veg) you would have to eat 3.7 pounds to get to 600 calories. I'm curious - how exactly do you eat that many sprouts each day?

B62ff15477b5fd539709a5014db51e4b

(185)

on August 06, 2012
at 06:55 PM

Thank you for your help!

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3 Answers

4
91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on August 06, 2012
at 06:39 PM

Unless you already have thyroid issues it shouldn't be a major problem. If you are steaming the foods it should help inactivate the goitrogenic compounds to some degree. Eating raw or juicing large amounts of these foods would pose more of a problem. That being said, mix it up and maybe not just eat mainly crucifers every day: zucchini, summer squash, and bok choy are some others you may enjoy steamed.

B62ff15477b5fd539709a5014db51e4b

(185)

on August 06, 2012
at 06:55 PM

Thank you for your help!

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 12:59 AM

bok choy is another goitrogenic food, lol. But yeah, cooking removes alot of it, so try and cook the heck out of them would be by advice. And if you have iodine foods, like fish, dairy, cranberry, eggs, try and eat them seperately as foods.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 07, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Mind you if you have a high iodine intake (lots of eggs for example), it probably is more helpful than harmful. Lots of people with hyperthyroid find it useful to delibrately eat lots of these foods, and if you have high iodine intake, or use coconut oil, its possible your thyroid could use slowing down. An area I am only just learning about myself...

1
6cb9eb6228b5c0c358e4ac28f71a391d

on August 06, 2012
at 11:50 PM

This is my own anecdotal experience:

I am hypothyroid, and am treated with just 1 grain of a natural porcine-based prescription (Nature-Throid). If anything, I have been consuming way more of these veggies after going Paleo (about 6 mos ago) however, I've been being treated for hypothyroidism for 2 years. I haven't noticed a change over the last 6 mos, nor has my lab work - my numbers are fantastic. Conversely, many of the nutrients found within those veggies actually support thyroid function.

Do you feel as though you are having adverse symptoms? You could get your thyroid levels checked, perhaps? Just make sure you find a functional medicine doctor who doesn't just treat numbers, but also takes into consideration your symptoms. Stop the Thyroid Madness is a fantastic website which gave me the knowledge I needed to get another opinion on my "within range" thyroid numbers.

0
0b4326a4949718451a8571b82558dc10

on August 06, 2012
at 08:22 PM

Whenever I start getting sore, tired, and lethargic I lighten up on spinach for a day or two and usually feel a lot better but I think I might have a thyroid problem.

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