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Vegetable oils not inflammatory

Commented on February 12, 2014
Created February 06, 2014 at 5:50 PM

Effect of Dietary Linoleic Acid on Markers of Inflammation in Healthy Persons: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

"We conclude that virtually no evidence is available from randomized, controlled intervention studies among healthy, noninfant human beings to show that addition of LA to the diet increases the concentration of inflammatory markers." See here

That's one of the pillars of paleo.

Jaminet (2013) cites studies on oxidative stress from PUFAs pp.116-120.

Any views on this?

736662d9fd6314d426cc6de1896aa045

(175)

on February 12, 2014
at 08:28 PM

Thanks. Thought I'd replied earlier.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 06, 2014
at 07:11 PM

Yes, there is an EDIT option, just click at the little cog icon on the top right of the post.

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2 Answers

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Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on February 06, 2014
at 06:14 PM

Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid, which means that you must eat it. Linoleic acid, is present in many foods including vegetable fats/oils and animal fat/oils. Virtually all oils contain some amount (some contain only trivial amounts) of LA. The human body adipose tissue's fat composition contains roughly 11% LA.

The trouble with polyunsaturated fats is their tendency to oxidize quite readily, and thus generate a substantial amount of peroxide radicals produced by lipid peroxidation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipid_peroxidation). Polyunsaturated fatty acids are much more prone to degradation due to their numerous double bonds. This can trigger cascades of oxidative stress in cells which can promote premature apoptosis (cell death) due to excessive cellular damage. Accelerated cellular damage caused by lipid peroxidation can have negative consequences and promote degeneration of cellular components, including cellular DNA, mitochondria, and cell membranes. Furthermore, many of the end-products of lipid peroxidation include carcinogens which may promote tumorigenesis.

Inflammation is not the only mechanism by which diseases are initiated, so even if polyunsaturated fatty acids are not linked to inflammation, they are still less that optimal for human consumption, specially in cells that do not have sufficiently large amounts of catalase, such as pancreatic beta cells.

I personally opt for monounsaturated fat (oleic acid in particular), not inflammatory, greatly improves lipid profile, and is not susceptible to lipid peroxidation (specially if accompanied by naturally occurring lipophilic vitamin E, such as in olive oil or almonds) unless heated excessively.

736662d9fd6314d426cc6de1896aa045

(175)

on February 12, 2014
at 08:28 PM

Thanks. Thought I'd replied earlier.

0
736662d9fd6314d426cc6de1896aa045

(175)

on February 06, 2014
at 05:52 PM

Sorry about the clunky title & link - no edit option available.

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 06, 2014
at 07:11 PM

Yes, there is an EDIT option, just click at the little cog icon on the top right of the post.

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