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How do you get full on a vegetarian/pescetarian paleo diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 13, 2012 at 1:18 AM

It's hard to stay legume/grain-free on a vegetarian/pescetarian paleo diet. Soy is out, dairy is out, but for me, seafood and eggs are in. I imagine it would be even harder for vegan paleos. What are you vegan-paleos eating for satiation and protein? I'm not strictly vegetarian or pescetarian, but have reverted back to eating this way mostly. I've also added quinoa, polenta, and limited rice and legumes back into my diet, which seems to help. Any tricks for getting around soy proteins? P.S.- I do eat meat on the weekends and am not interested in any vegetarian-hate responses, or any push to eat more meat, or more seafood (nervous about toxins, as it is).

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 28, 2012
at 11:34 AM

Traditional lutefisk dinner is liberally doused with melted butter. The reconstituted codfish is full of protein and water, but very few calories and without the butter you're not satisfied even after eating platefuls.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on December 28, 2012
at 05:17 AM

Here's your Mediterranean diet: http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional-diets/mediterranean-diet (This message is approved by my immigrant mother)

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 13, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Yes, add more fat to your meals. Salmon with pesto is wonderful. Be generous with the olive oil on your salads and the butter on your vegetables. Fish that are eaten relatively young and small have less toxins than those that are large and old. Eat your salmon, smelt, sardines, trout (wild, all of them) with gusto.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:50 AM

I carry that list with me, thanks. Yes, I eat some starchy veg/ sweet potatoes, yum!

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:45 AM

This is a pretty good resource: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

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8 Answers

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3
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on September 13, 2012
at 01:29 AM

Lyndsay- I probably eat similarly to you. I eat legumes, very carefully-prepared--usually lentils or heirloom variety beans. I also eat plenty in the way of fat (olive oil, lard, coconut oil, ghee). I don't feel good eating grains. They tend to make me hungrier, in all honesty. Sprouted or well-soaked legumes fill me up plenty if I use olive oil with them. They also have more protein than rice/quinoa/polenta. I also eat lots of pastured eggs and a good amount of fruit. I make sure to eat lots of bone broth as well. The actual flesh component of my meals is adequate right now, but not high.

I think the biggest thing for me personally is to remember to eat lots of fat, including pastured animal fats.

4
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on September 13, 2012
at 03:15 AM

It sounds like you need to add more fat to your meals, either through fattier fish or cuts of meat, or in your veggies. Finishing veg with some olive oil, salt, and pepper, eating an avocado (if you can't get fresh, buy Wholly Guacamole packaged), flaking fish and mixing in homemade mayo, olive oil, or coconut oil, etc.

I stopped needing to snack between meals by incorporating an extra tablespoon or two of fat into my meal.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 13, 2012
at 03:16 PM

Yes, add more fat to your meals. Salmon with pesto is wonderful. Be generous with the olive oil on your salads and the butter on your vegetables. Fish that are eaten relatively young and small have less toxins than those that are large and old. Eat your salmon, smelt, sardines, trout (wild, all of them) with gusto.

3
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on September 13, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Starchy root veggies with lots of coconut oil? Nuts/seeds? Avocados?

If you are looking to avoid toxins in fish, there are plenty of lists online that indicate which species are generally safe and which ones are likely to have high levels of toxins.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:45 AM

This is a pretty good resource: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:50 AM

I carry that list with me, thanks. Yes, I eat some starchy veg/ sweet potatoes, yum!

2
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on December 28, 2012
at 05:27 AM

Lindsay, where do you live? Do you have fresh seafood markets, harvested in the same day as it's being sold?

Try to eat a big variety of fish and seafood, including things like fish eggs, squid, turtle, octopus, oysters, eel... The more variety you eat, the less you have to worry about toxins. Also make sure to eat the head, eyes (yes, eyes!), fins, soft bones, and tails of small fish.

Consider making fish/seafood stocks from the carcass and heads. (Link; scroll down to "Fish stock" recipe). Make lots every weekend and have some every day. You could eat a seaweed soup or a coconut curry before you eat your main [fish] dish.

When my family ate fish at a meal, we always had more than one course and there was a lot of fat (like butter) or eggs, and also onions or potatoes (less vegetables than seafood, though).

...

Don't just eat fish fillets like most Westerners do nowadays! I hate when people talk about a "healthy Mediterranean [seafood] diet" which is nearly impossible to accomplish in USA unless you're extremely wealthy, like, uh, Bill Gates? Most of these foods are not available in USA, let alone for twice-a-day consumption. My family was one of the wealthiest and still only managed to eat seafood about 3 times per week.

...

You'll probably need to consume lots of coconut oil and coconut milk. If you have dairy, butter is a good choice too. (Personally), when I eat fish or seafood, for my plate I use about 3 tablespoons or more of cooking fat or I'm hungry soon after.

You might want to finish the fish/seafood meals with a high-calorie desserts like custards (egg/milk) or whipped heavy cream with strawberry sauce, if you find yourself hungry often. (Edit: sorry! Just saw "dairy is out"! So how about coconut milk and egg pudding, maybe with a little rice. Avocado chocolate mousse. Banana cooked in coconut milk (thai) ... you can make these ahead of time in small ramekin dishes and eat one after each meal. Hey, actually coconut ice cream is delicious, you could even make pina colada ice cream!)

...

Type this into Google for interesting stuff:

"the nasty bits" fish site:seriouseats.com

Something else that came to mind is that you eat meat on weekends. Would you consider eating the same amount of meat you eat now, but spreading it out throughout the week? I think that would help a lot with keeping you satiated. You could stretch out that amount of meat into small soups or salads to have as the first course in a meal, then eat fish/seafood as the second meal.
For example, one beef chuck steak sliced into tiny bits and marinated could give you 4 servings of soup to eat before the fish :-)

Hope something I wrote helps!

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 28, 2012
at 11:34 AM

Traditional lutefisk dinner is liberally doused with melted butter. The reconstituted codfish is full of protein and water, but very few calories and without the butter you're not satisfied even after eating platefuls.

2
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on September 13, 2012
at 02:22 PM

I eat mostly seafood and chicken breast for protein, but I also do frequently eat cottage cheese as well...and I've been eating pork tenderloin on the weekends lately as well. If you are worried about toxins in seafood, first diversify and don't eat salmon or farmed seafood. Low toxin, low mercury sources are virtually all shellfish, sardines, tilapia, and cod. Low in toxins but not mercury is tuna fish. However, there is evidence that the selenium in seafood counteracts the mercury, and tuna is high in selenium. Chicken breast is a great source of protein because it is so lean and easily digested, and contains no toxins to mention if it is organic and free range.

First, make sure you are drinking enough and are well hydrated. A lot times we're just thirsty and mistake it for hunger. Drink a 16oz glass of water and wait 10 minutes. If you are still hungry, then eat something.

Make protein and non starchy vegetables the centerpiece of every meal. Make sure you are eating enough protein and a diversity of vegetables (i.e. mixed salads). Since it is doubtful this will be enough calories, add in some healthy fats (my favorite sources are mixed nuts, extra virgin olive oil, and macadamia nut oil). If you do low intensity workouts, it is certainly fine to add in some fruit to give you a boost. If you are doing high intensity workouts, then it is beneficial to add in some denser starch sources around your workout window. I personally see no problem adding some chickpeas to your salads. So, in order of importance- protein and variety of vegetables at each meal. Then add in some healthy fats and then carbs for workouts.

Finally, if you are still weary on seafood, I would recommend adding in some dairy for protein. I find the casein protein helps me feel satiated but not heavy, and gives me steady energy levels throughout the day. A solid cottage cheese will do, and the only brand I eat and recommend is Friendship brand 1% cottage cheese (I get the no-salt added variety) because it has an unbeatable protein/carb ratio of 16 grams of protein per 4 grams of carbs in each 113 gram, half cup serving. Incredible. You could also try adding in a small amount of goat or sheeps milk feta to salads (which everyone should be eating). I do purely for taste. Who doesn't like a Greek salad?

That should give you a good idea on where to get calories from and in what order of importance. Hope it helps.

P.S. Don't let paleo dogma get in the way of you eating a healthy diet. In my humble opinion, a carb and calorie controlled diet based around seafood, lean cuts of meat, a variety of vegetables, nuts, MUFA oils, yogurt/cheese, and possibly some innocuous beans/legumes (chickpeas, lentils) in measured amounts is the best diet for both health/physical performance and weight management. I'm sure you are aware this is the Mediterranean diet, which you can then paleo/primalize simply by cutting out the bread and beans/legumes, but IMHO these foods aren't inherently terrible for you as long as you are eating an otherwise nutrient dense, whole foods diet and keeping your overall calorie count controlled and your starchy carb and fruit content moderate/congruent with your activity levels and the type of activities you engage in.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on December 28, 2012
at 05:17 AM

Here's your Mediterranean diet: http://www.westonaprice.org/traditional-diets/mediterranean-diet (This message is approved by my immigrant mother)

1
Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 28, 2012
at 11:28 AM

Cioppinos and chowders are hearty ways to combine lots of oil, seafood, root vegetables and tomatoes. The last batch I made was based on a 28 oz can of crushed tomatoes, part of the Halloween pumpkin (an edible variety, prebaked in chunks), half a jar of oysters, a couple sweet potatoes, several razor clams, plus seasonings/onion/garlic/oil/butter to taste. I let it simmer for 4 hours to get the clam necks fork tender.

1
1e58ba5c171a122541d8b4873f604327

on December 27, 2012
at 11:52 PM

Have you tried pressure-cooking legumes? Ive only just started myself but for what I read its supposed to rectify some of the problems with beans, and break down a lot of the phytates and lectins. If you search paleohacks for pressure cooker you should find some good stuff. Good luck

0
6606721777255a56f7cd503afe90012f

on February 10, 2013
at 03:00 PM

Hi Lyndsay, First, I want to say that no diet plan needs to be followed to the T. Everyone's body and (more importantly) lifestyle is different an it would be irresponsible to recommend the strict set of paleo rules for everyone.

So, don't feel like you've got to completely get rid of legumes. They are cheap and good sources of fiber, protein, and many micronutrients. To get rid of some of the phytates, soak lentils and throw away the water before cooking. This does get rid of some of the nutrientsv(does soaking beans reduce their nutritional value) but it makes them easier to digest.

You can also try sprouting lentils.

If you are feeling hungry constantly, it may not be with the foods you are eating. Rather, the reason may be your eating schedule. Be prepared to snack constantly throughout the day.

For protein, stock up on lots of seeds and nuts.

You can make an awesome veggie burger out of ground sunflower seeds and shredded veggies. Use flax meal and an egg to hold the seed/veggie mixture together. Then bake or fry in healthy oils.

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