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Paleo on bus tour for teen?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 16, 2013 at 3:16 PM

I'm a teen who's been paleo-ish for nearly a year now. In a few days, I'll be leaving for a bus tour with my parents (I'm the only one who's paleo). We'll be flying to a hotel before the bus part, but I can bring some boiled eggs since the flight is only a few hours. The problem is, I don't know what to eat for the rest of the vacation. We'll be in a tour group and everything, so there won't be any time to cook and we'll be either on a bus or outside the whole day. We don't have enough luggage space to bring canned foods. From my past experiences, these buses tend to stop at places such as McDonald's as opposed to the restaurants with steak/seafood... any suggestions?

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:26 PM

*most harmful in pre-prepared, processed foods. // //

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:24 PM

-- & would recommend the same to even the healthiest mountain climber/hiker I know (who would likely be able to digest and process a wide range of poor- to high- quality foods and get a good return of fairly clean energy), simply because of the sheer number and amount of deleterious additives in nearly all pre-prepared foods. (& some prolonged fasting if necessary, & some extra hiking to buy cleaner foods from cleaner restaurants or grocery stores as needed, & then only if really necessary eating something like the filling of a McDonalds breakfast biscuit/burger)

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:22 PM

(Salad greens may be your best bet. Fruits in pre-prepared salads have 1-3 preservatives on average as well. Greens are least likely to contain any additives, but not terribly filling, either. [As an example of the extremely rampant amount of additives in "foods", sandwiches (e.g. "chicken salad and egg"), or salads or "brown-rice and vegetable mix" type dishes in the pre-prepared cold section of a Starbucks contain, on average, 20-40 ingredients. **20-40.**] // Even as a fairly vital human being, I always opt for nuts, coconut butter, small jars of home-cooked foods, goji berries, etc., --

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:18 PM

-- & would recommend the same to even the healthiest mountain climber/hiker I know (who would likely be able to digest and process a wide range of poor- to high- quality foods and get a good return of fairly clean energy), simply because of the sheer number and amount of deleterious additives in nearly all pre-prepared foods. (& some prolonged fasting if necessary, & some extra hiking to buy cleaner foods from cleaner restaurants or grocery stores as needed, & then only if really necessary eating something like a McDonalds breakfast biscuit)

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:10 PM

(Salad greens may be your best bet. Fruits in pre-prepared salads have 1-3 preservatives on average as well. Greens are least likely too, but not terribly filling, either. [As an example of the extremely rampant amount of additives in "foods", sandwiches (e.g. "chicken salad and egg", or salads or "brown-rice and vegetable mix" type dishes in the pre-prepared cold section of a Starbucks contain, on average, 20-40 ingredients. **20-40.**]) // Even as a fairly vital human being, I always opt for nuts, coconut butter, small jars of home-cooked foods, goji berries, etc., --

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:04 PM

Just a quick note for straightforwardness - if you do go the route of buying bacon/eggs/meats, it is likely that the eggs will contain a mixture of other artificial substances to make the "patty", and all three will contain copious amounts of additives (likely at least six additives, to the one ingredient a natural bit of egg, bacon, or beef would be). It is these additives and the low-quality, potentially reused PUFA oils which are the most harmful of pre-prepared processed foods. // //

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2 Answers

1
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 16, 2013
at 03:24 PM

If you have been paleo for a year, you should have a pretty good idea what to eat and not eat. Sometimes that means picking the lesser of two evils. Go with salads, meats, avoid breads and things that are fried. Be creative. Plus the occasional bad food won't kill you.

0
91ffa843c455d412e0d64f5550846eaf

on August 16, 2013
at 07:56 PM

I know you said that there isn't room for canned goods but what about nuts? I had a similar fear but ended up making it through about 80% paleo. McDonalds or other fast food places sometimes serve their breakfast menus all day - you could get an egg/bacon sandwich and not eat the bread, or fruit. A lot of places are switching to healthier side options so fruit may be more readily available than you imagine. Get a dry hamburger and don't eat the bun, I think it will be more doable than you imagine. Obviously the meat won't be grassfed but staying away from gluten and grains is becoming easier than some people imagine. Dairy and soy will be harder to avoid but I say just give it your best shot, drink A LOT of water and don't beat yourself up if you have to eat something totally un-paleo. Good luck!

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:18 PM

-- & would recommend the same to even the healthiest mountain climber/hiker I know (who would likely be able to digest and process a wide range of poor- to high- quality foods and get a good return of fairly clean energy), simply because of the sheer number and amount of deleterious additives in nearly all pre-prepared foods. (& some prolonged fasting if necessary, & some extra hiking to buy cleaner foods from cleaner restaurants or grocery stores as needed, & then only if really necessary eating something like a McDonalds breakfast biscuit)

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:10 PM

(Salad greens may be your best bet. Fruits in pre-prepared salads have 1-3 preservatives on average as well. Greens are least likely too, but not terribly filling, either. [As an example of the extremely rampant amount of additives in "foods", sandwiches (e.g. "chicken salad and egg", or salads or "brown-rice and vegetable mix" type dishes in the pre-prepared cold section of a Starbucks contain, on average, 20-40 ingredients. **20-40.**]) // Even as a fairly vital human being, I always opt for nuts, coconut butter, small jars of home-cooked foods, goji berries, etc., --

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:04 PM

Just a quick note for straightforwardness - if you do go the route of buying bacon/eggs/meats, it is likely that the eggs will contain a mixture of other artificial substances to make the "patty", and all three will contain copious amounts of additives (likely at least six additives, to the one ingredient a natural bit of egg, bacon, or beef would be). It is these additives and the low-quality, potentially reused PUFA oils which are the most harmful of pre-prepared processed foods. // //

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:22 PM

(Salad greens may be your best bet. Fruits in pre-prepared salads have 1-3 preservatives on average as well. Greens are least likely to contain any additives, but not terribly filling, either. [As an example of the extremely rampant amount of additives in "foods", sandwiches (e.g. "chicken salad and egg"), or salads or "brown-rice and vegetable mix" type dishes in the pre-prepared cold section of a Starbucks contain, on average, 20-40 ingredients. **20-40.**] // Even as a fairly vital human being, I always opt for nuts, coconut butter, small jars of home-cooked foods, goji berries, etc., --

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:26 PM

*most harmful in pre-prepared, processed foods. // //

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 16, 2013
at 08:24 PM

-- & would recommend the same to even the healthiest mountain climber/hiker I know (who would likely be able to digest and process a wide range of poor- to high- quality foods and get a good return of fairly clean energy), simply because of the sheer number and amount of deleterious additives in nearly all pre-prepared foods. (& some prolonged fasting if necessary, & some extra hiking to buy cleaner foods from cleaner restaurants or grocery stores as needed, & then only if really necessary eating something like the filling of a McDonalds breakfast biscuit/burger)

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