2

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Please explain Tripe

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 28, 2011 at 2:08 PM

Can someone please explain tripe in terms that I can understand? Warning: I have the intellect of a five-year-old.

I've got some fatty ice-cube-like things in the freezer, which I understand is tripe. I bought it at a Mexican-American market under the name menudo. Had a misunderstanding with the clerk but she was way too pretty to make a fuss, so I smiled and paid for whatever she gave me. Gracios!

Now at the supermarket I see something labeled tripe, looks like a big meat pie, translucent enough to see fatty whiteness inside, sorta. What is it?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 05:57 PM

Hey, gotta get the offal in somehow! ;P

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 28, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Liver pizza??? I just lost my apetite and it's lunchtime...

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Okay, okay. Liver can be yummy too! In fact, last night, my hubby and I had it on rice-crust pizzas. ;)

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Yup, stomach organ tissue, not the contents.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on September 28, 2011
at 03:58 PM

I think it doesn't look exactly like muscle meat the same way that beef heart and beef tongue (both muscular) are slightly different from typical muscle meat. It's just a slightly different function, so a slightly different texture! Incidentally tripe's inherent extra-chewiness is supposedly one of the glories of a good bowl of pho, especially Southern Vietnamese pho, which can often feature tendon, tripe, and meatballs.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:45 PM

Why doesn't it look like muscle, then? Sorry, five-year-olds like just keep asking questions.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Huey- The stomach/intestines are muscular. A cows stomach for sure is muscular due to the constant churning of the fermenting bacteria the cow subsists on.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:32 PM

By the way, liver IS exciting!

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:31 PM

What, you mean like the stomach contents? Ick! If not, if it's the stomach organ tissue, why doesn't it look like a membrane or something? I thought the stomach was a membranous sack.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:23 PM

It's often found in soup, such as menudo and pho. I can't vouch for these recipes, but a google pulled these up: (just leave out the noodles for the pho - unless you have a paleo noodle substitute) http://homecooking.about.com/od/soups/r/blss18.htm http://www.ehow.com/how_2354249_pho-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup.html

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:18 PM

"Slang - something, especially speech or writing, that is false or worthless; rubbish." Oh, wait. You meant the other tripe!

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1 Answers

1
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:14 PM

Tripe is typically beef stomach. But it can also be the stomach of sheep, goats, pigs and deer.

From Wiki:

Beef tripe is usually made from only the first three chambers of a cow's stomach: the rumen (blanket/flat/smooth tripe), the reticulum (honeycomb and pocket tripe), and the omasum (book/bible/leaf tripe). Abomasum (reed) tripe is seen much less frequently, owing to its glandular tissue content.

When tripe is well-prepared it can be really yummy! When it's poorly prepared it can be as exciting as liver.

Best of luck!

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:31 PM

What, you mean like the stomach contents? Ick! If not, if it's the stomach organ tissue, why doesn't it look like a membrane or something? I thought the stomach was a membranous sack.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 05:57 PM

Hey, gotta get the offal in somehow! ;P

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:23 PM

It's often found in soup, such as menudo and pho. I can't vouch for these recipes, but a google pulled these up: (just leave out the noodles for the pho - unless you have a paleo noodle substitute) http://homecooking.about.com/od/soups/r/blss18.htm http://www.ehow.com/how_2354249_pho-vietnamese-beef-noodle-soup.html

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:45 PM

Why doesn't it look like muscle, then? Sorry, five-year-olds like just keep asking questions.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:32 PM

By the way, liver IS exciting!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 28, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Huey- The stomach/intestines are muscular. A cows stomach for sure is muscular due to the constant churning of the fermenting bacteria the cow subsists on.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Yup, stomach organ tissue, not the contents.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 28, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Okay, okay. Liver can be yummy too! In fact, last night, my hubby and I had it on rice-crust pizzas. ;)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on September 28, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Liver pizza??? I just lost my apetite and it's lunchtime...

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on September 28, 2011
at 03:58 PM

I think it doesn't look exactly like muscle meat the same way that beef heart and beef tongue (both muscular) are slightly different from typical muscle meat. It's just a slightly different function, so a slightly different texture! Incidentally tripe's inherent extra-chewiness is supposedly one of the glories of a good bowl of pho, especially Southern Vietnamese pho, which can often feature tendon, tripe, and meatballs.

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