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nutritional value of birch tree sap

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 04, 2011 at 9:53 PM

I remember when i was a young boy i used to collect tree sap. Just trees from our backyard. I cant believe that i forgot that thing, thats one thing i can gather myself, along with berrier and mushrooms ofcourse :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 26, 2011
at 05:51 PM

thats nice. sweety squirell

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 26, 2011
at 10:39 AM

At the end of the winter in the US I have seen maple trees oozing sugary sap from wounds made by squirrels.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 05, 2011
at 07:33 AM

Well ofcourse thereis plenty of sugar in syrup, since its very consentrated form. But basic birch _sap_ has very little, it doesnt taste so sweet at all. Its definatly very paleo.. :) And spring is the season to drink it. I am not buying it from stores, i will go collecting it from woods myself.

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4 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 26, 2011
at 02:31 AM

It's a small jump from here to sugar cane sap....and from there to natural ethanol....a weak paleo rum....

But did Grok come up with the idea of adding anise seeds? Is pastis paleo?

I need to dig into this a little further. On a hot summer day. In Provence.

1
Dd017a9b1f2d6a9c220859f780da09c5

on April 05, 2011
at 03:07 AM

I just saw birch tree sap yesterday in a specialty food store.. i had never seen it before.. was curious how it compares to maple syrup which i use occasionally.. according to wikipedia, birch sap is 67% sugar.

Birch sap sugar is about 42???54% fructose and 45% glucose, with a small amount of sucrose and trace amounts of galactose. The flavor of birch syrup is distinctive???rich and caramel-like, with a hint of spiciness.

Maple syrup, on the other hand, is primarily sucrose and water.

Interesting:

Making birch syrup is more difficult than making maple syrup, requiring about 80 to 110 liters of sap to produce one liter of syrup (more than twice that needed for maple syrup).

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 05, 2011
at 07:33 AM

Well ofcourse thereis plenty of sugar in syrup, since its very consentrated form. But basic birch _sap_ has very little, it doesnt taste so sweet at all. Its definatly very paleo.. :) And spring is the season to drink it. I am not buying it from stores, i will go collecting it from woods myself.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 26, 2011
at 10:11 AM

i did once sap a birch tree. and it was kinda sweet. it wasin the countryside of berlin. it also start to ferment after sometime. its very interesting how this substance be.I made a hole in the tree. In the main period you just can break a twig which is more friedly to the tree. And the water drops out.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 26, 2011
at 10:39 AM

At the end of the winter in the US I have seen maple trees oozing sugary sap from wounds made by squirrels.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 26, 2011
at 05:51 PM

thats nice. sweety squirell

0
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on July 26, 2011
at 03:23 AM

I like just the taste of the fresh sap without it being boiled. It's the coconut water of the north! It's harder to tap than maple though. Last time I tried in Sweden I didn't get much.

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