6

votes

Good paleo countries?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2010 at 11:18 AM

Which countries have good access to naturally-raised/pastured meats/dairy? Where should a paleo dieter visit (or move to)? Ireland and New Zealand jump to mind; Europe in general sounds good.

Having never been outside the US though, I'm pretty clueless.

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 03, 2010
at 08:42 PM

Did you immigrate there? Any tips or websites that you could recommend about moving there and getting a job?

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 03, 2010
at 08:40 PM

I have two friends who married Swedish girls and lived in Sweden. They both say that the people are more friendly, educated and that life is less competitive than here in the States. That being said both left (with their wives) after around the 9 year mark as the winter darkness and cold were too much for them to handle. Maybe being from California spoiled them in that department.

2ca12e89c4d756d36e149dcad91a9b58

(0)

on April 06, 2010
at 02:12 AM

This is good to know -- Mexico being so much closer than other countries mentioned on this list!

4383185697932f5ea4ed0765053c54c4

(60)

on March 25, 2010
at 08:06 PM

FYI, Kerrygold cheese is available in bulk-cut blocks at Trader Joe's (in the US) for significantly cheaper than pre-packaged elsewhere.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 13, 2010
at 10:33 AM

@Sandra: I believe most exported lamb is grass-fed; it's the exported NZ beef that's more likely to be grain-fed. There's considerable extra expense in grain-feeding, so it only makes sense in certain cases (one butcher told me the taste of grass-fed beef was an issue for some exporters, whereas it doesn't bother locals).

13b40c07d0aab810f48eec3d04877010

(410)

on March 12, 2010
at 10:46 PM

hmmm... I was assuming that lamb I buy here in California from New Zealand or Austalia is grass-fed even though it is not labeled so. I wonder if I'm getting "export grade" stuff- hopefully not!

5cc9908801b79ff820bbc1eb7ac01b8f

on March 12, 2010
at 06:27 PM

We went to New Zealand for our honeymoon. We didn't stick to our diet, but we definitely could have. The lamb there is delicious and plentiful.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 10:07 PM

Yeah Abe, I have the neighbours free range chicken walking around our yard right now...it just wouldn't be nice to eat theirs! Larger farms seem to love chemicals- I can never be sure about the veggies, but eat them anyway. I have tomatoes growing in the back yard and a baby pineapple I started from a cut off top last year.

127116e41acceee9f2f000076f8b788d

(477)

on March 11, 2010
at 05:41 PM

Most of the beef here in Mexico is definitely grass fed and organic. We don't call it grass-fed beef, we just call it beef. Organic produce can be found just about anywhere that has local produce. Just ask if they use chemicals. Most don't, especially in the rural areas. Tortillas, beans and rice are in almost every meal, so you'll have to avoid them, but beef is relatively cheap, pork and chicken are as well. Most chickens int he rural areas are free range, and again, they're just called chickens, not free-range chickens.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 18, 2010
at 10:39 PM

Wow. While I was there I read some articles about how grain-fed was becoming more popular, but the article left me with the impression that grain-fed beef was the minority of beef sold in Argentina.

C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

(240)

on February 18, 2010
at 01:59 AM

Although It is becoming prety difficult to procure grass fed meat here in Buenos Aires. Virtually unkown here 10 years ago, feed-lot meat is becoming the norm, especially in the capital. Much of the grass-fed meat is either eaten in the provinces or exported. I only found one butcher that certifies me that all his meat is grass-fed.

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10 Answers

8
711c19a8b034718b127362a72ac631ef

(155)

on February 13, 2010
at 11:49 AM

I'm from Australia, and all supermarket beef is pasture fed. Pasture fed beef is the cheapest and most common variety, but if you want "export quality" grain fed beef then you will pay a premium price here. Of course lamb is all grass fed, very tasty, tender and juicy. Until recently it was very cheap but is now dearer than beef. Another cheap, healthy and commonly availble meat is kangaroo. Personally, I dont like the flavour unless it has been in a marinade for a while. It is very lean and rather tough. Dairy cows are primarily pasture fed although they are fed grains and molassis during milking, so I guess the omega 3 to 6 ratio in our cheese, butter and cream should be pretty good. BTW I've never seen a feedlot here, although I know that they do exist. I see beef cattle everyday and they're all chowin' down on nice long green pasture around here all year long!

5
5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

on March 11, 2010
at 01:31 AM

I live in New Zealand, which is basically a country full of farmers, so I've found it to be very Paleo-friendly.

All readily-available beef and lamb sold here is grass-fed. As in Australia, the grain-fed stuff is considered "export grade," and is more expensive.

Raw milk is also available here, although you have to buy it directly from the farmer, where it's produced (it can't be transported or delivered).

Farmer's markets are popular, and it's pretty easy to find farmer's who sell directly from their farms, on the side of the road.

Even within the city limits, it's legal to keep up to six chickens on your property, so it's easy to raise them yourself for eggs or meat.

The strong sun makes it very easy to have a successful vegetable garden. Things tend to grow really fast.

13b40c07d0aab810f48eec3d04877010

(410)

on March 12, 2010
at 10:46 PM

hmmm... I was assuming that lamb I buy here in California from New Zealand or Austalia is grass-fed even though it is not labeled so. I wonder if I'm getting "export grade" stuff- hopefully not!

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 13, 2010
at 10:33 AM

@Sandra: I believe most exported lamb is grass-fed; it's the exported NZ beef that's more likely to be grain-fed. There's considerable extra expense in grain-feeding, so it only makes sense in certain cases (one butcher told me the taste of grass-fed beef was an issue for some exporters, whereas it doesn't bother locals).

5cc9908801b79ff820bbc1eb7ac01b8f

on March 12, 2010
at 06:27 PM

We went to New Zealand for our honeymoon. We didn't stick to our diet, but we definitely could have. The lamb there is delicious and plentiful.

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 03, 2010
at 08:42 PM

Did you immigrate there? Any tips or websites that you could recommend about moving there and getting a job?

4
Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 25, 2010
at 10:48 AM

And no one has mentioned France!! I wrote about the paleo delights of Europe in general here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/1820/paleo-while-travelling/1830#1830 which may help.

3
70d9359a2086e890a4c3bccb2ba8a8cb

(2254)

on April 05, 2010
at 10:34 AM

I spent a few days in Sweden recently, and to my delight I discovered that a lot of paleo(ish) products that are harder to find in other countries are considerably more accessible there.

I don't know about grassfed meat specifically as I didn't have time to investigate, but just in a smallish bog-standard Stockholm supermarket I came across all of the following:

  • Sauerkraut and (yes!) Korean kimchi (lacto-fermented vegetables) - and the label explicitly stated that they were unpasteurised and contained live bacteria
  • 100% heavy whipping cream (42% fat) with NO added ingredients (like yucky carrageenan which I have been unable to avoid in so many other countries) very reasonably priced, not to mention dozens of different brands of sour cream
  • a dozen different types of coconut milk and coconut cream
  • blocks of coconut oil for about the same price as butter - though it didn't say virgin so I assume it was refined, but it still has its uses
  • a bewildering variety of berries (fresh, frozen, dried), although a bit pricey but maybe they're cheaper when in season
  • lots of smoked fish (mackerel being fairly cheap) and preserved herring
  • a large variety of meat including wild animals like reindeer (fresh and smoked/salted), elk and bear (!)
  • my favourite: a jerky called "Wild Chips" which according to the packet is just dried, smoked and salted strips of meat from wild elk, reindeer and venison, no other ingredients added; a bit pricey but very tasty and it's the first preservative-free jerky I've ever found in Europe

What I love about Scandinavia is that they love their meat & fish and they're certainly not afraid of traditional high-fat products. Of course alongside this you also find a lot of grains and crap being sold (the low-fat dairy and cooking oil substitutes section of the supermarket was scarily populated), but these seem easier to avoid than in other countries.

Sweden seems to be doing a good job of catering to the paleosphere and in general to a wide variety of "food cultures".

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 03, 2010
at 08:40 PM

I have two friends who married Swedish girls and lived in Sweden. They both say that the people are more friendly, educated and that life is less competitive than here in the States. That being said both left (with their wives) after around the 9 year mark as the winter darkness and cold were too much for them to handle. Maybe being from California spoiled them in that department.

3
5ad1c5e83d71e9d83942df6c6f0c4b6a

on March 11, 2010
at 12:49 PM

From what I have heard, Sweden is moving closer and closer to Primal/Paleo every day. The low carb, high fat movement is growing there.

Sweden would more than likely be a great country to be Primal in.

I also know Italy has raw milk vending machines throughout their country as well.

Ireland has a company called Kerrygold. They make grass-fed butter and cheese and they are imported here in the U.S. as well.

4383185697932f5ea4ed0765053c54c4

(60)

on March 25, 2010
at 08:06 PM

FYI, Kerrygold cheese is available in bulk-cut blocks at Trader Joe's (in the US) for significantly cheaper than pre-packaged elsewhere.

3
93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 13, 2010
at 06:20 PM

I don't know if you should move anywhere just for food -- but for traveling purposes and eating Paleo, Chile, Argentina and Uruguay have a strong tradition of grilled meats and offal with veggies (this is called "parrilla"). Those countries also like to eat a lot of bread as well, but if you avoid that you can do quite well eating the grass-fed beef in Argentina.

If you are ever in Buenos Aires, I recommend La Cabrera:

http://www.parrillalacabrera.com.ar/platos/platos2.html

More here:

http://argentinastravel.com/61/the-parilla-a-delicious-staple-of-the-argentine-table/

C150e1706e1299323591da93208e603f

(240)

on February 18, 2010
at 01:59 AM

Although It is becoming prety difficult to procure grass fed meat here in Buenos Aires. Virtually unkown here 10 years ago, feed-lot meat is becoming the norm, especially in the capital. Much of the grass-fed meat is either eaten in the provinces or exported. I only found one butcher that certifies me that all his meat is grass-fed.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on February 18, 2010
at 10:39 PM

Wow. While I was there I read some articles about how grain-fed was becoming more popular, but the article left me with the impression that grain-fed beef was the minority of beef sold in Argentina.

2
0fd24d837dbad54740f53cc5f72068a0

(285)

on March 25, 2010
at 03:58 PM

I was born and raised in Beef Country USA. Arrogantly we think we have the best beef. While it is tasty and fat, some of us now know that grain/corn-fed beef isn't that good for us. I believe pretty much all of Central America has grass-fed beef. Sometimes good things come out of having less $/resources! While it ain't Argentina quality, it's still pretty good. Plus there are lots of small farms, where one can get REAL free range eggs. I mean the chickens might end up in the neighbors yard eating his bugs too!

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 13, 2010
at 11:38 PM

Mexico seems to have mainly pastured beef. Somehow I don't think much produce is actually organically grown though. There is a good supply of fish and seafood.

The main problem here is avoiding all the rice and beans and tortillas.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 10:07 PM

Yeah Abe, I have the neighbours free range chicken walking around our yard right now...it just wouldn't be nice to eat theirs! Larger farms seem to love chemicals- I can never be sure about the veggies, but eat them anyway. I have tomatoes growing in the back yard and a baby pineapple I started from a cut off top last year.

127116e41acceee9f2f000076f8b788d

(477)

on March 11, 2010
at 05:41 PM

Most of the beef here in Mexico is definitely grass fed and organic. We don't call it grass-fed beef, we just call it beef. Organic produce can be found just about anywhere that has local produce. Just ask if they use chemicals. Most don't, especially in the rural areas. Tortillas, beans and rice are in almost every meal, so you'll have to avoid them, but beef is relatively cheap, pork and chicken are as well. Most chickens int he rural areas are free range, and again, they're just called chickens, not free-range chickens.

2ca12e89c4d756d36e149dcad91a9b58

(0)

on April 06, 2010
at 02:12 AM

This is good to know -- Mexico being so much closer than other countries mentioned on this list!

0
006f2e9b763058ff2332681c206563e4

on June 29, 2013
at 11:07 PM

I live in Germany and from my point of view, it's quite hard living a paleo livestyle here - especially for the meat because it's up to impossible to find grass-fed beef anywhere and the variety of veggies and fruits is tiny. But I've been in Dubai this year and DANG, their supermarkets (especially the big ones in malls) have just so much fruits and veggies from everywhere, I swear i bought a whole cart full of delicious stuff I haven't ever seen before. The variety on fish and other seafood is also really great - the crabs were still alive when you bought them because they were just fished some hours ago. I'd live there if I could, it's wonderful!

0
Medium avatar

(4878)

on June 29, 2013
at 07:00 PM

I'm in Crete (Greece) right now and LOVING the food. This is the "cleanest" I've been able to eat in a long time. The combination of "wild" meat and great sea food with LOTS of Vit D3 and daily plunges in the ocean are working their magic!!!

I wish I could feel this way all the time...

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