3

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Eating on the road

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 22, 2013 at 10:56 PM

I will be traveling 4000 miles on foot, starting in May of this year. What are some good choices for traveling food that will keep in my pack for several days, and provide decent nutrition to fuel long days of walking, that I will be able to re-stock fairly easily in town?

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on January 23, 2013
at 02:40 AM

I'm thru-hiking the American Discovery Trail, from California to Delaware

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5 Answers

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1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on January 23, 2013
at 12:58 AM

Depends on your route what will be available, of course!

Get one of these or something like it: http://www.amazon.com/X-Large-Hot-Cold-Insulated-Thermal-Storage/dp/B003LIQJVW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358902778&sr=8-1&keywords=hot+cold+bag

The more nutrient dense, the less weight you need to carry, KWIM?

If you are lacto-Paleo, hard cheese is a great option.

Hard-boiled eggs.

Beef jerky.

Canned tuna/salmon.

Avocados.

Liver pate

Dark Chocolate

3
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on January 22, 2013
at 11:22 PM

beef jerky, nuts, medjool dates, coconut oil- if you like it melted, cans of tuna/sardines/crab.

3
Medium avatar

on January 22, 2013
at 11:11 PM

I get lean beef leg blocks. Half freeze it and slice if very thin. Hang it on long wooden BBQ sticks run through a big cardboard box. Put a 2-300watt light bulb in the bottom. Cut a few small air inlet holes in the bottom of the side walls and a few more on the top, to create a convection air current facilitated by the heat of the light.

In the beginning when the meat is wet, leave the light bulb out, and with the top open add a big box fan blowing up/sucking wind through the box to initially dry the meat for 12hrs or so. Then remove the fan, add the light, close the top except for small venting, and dry until crispy (another day or so).

Keeps forever. You can then grind the product into powder in a blender and add copious amounts of rendered tallow, lard, or coconut oil (the latter beings prone to melting on hot days), and salt, and presto you have high calorie pemmican.

This carries me over many a mountain for weeks on my mountaineering adventures.

Coconut oil in bottles is your calorie friend. Japanese dried wakame seaweed is cheap, dry, and high nutrition.

Enjoy.

1
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on January 23, 2013
at 01:55 AM

jerkey and dried fruit are the first things that come to mind dried fruit

1
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on January 23, 2013
at 01:31 AM

Wow! Where are you traveling?

Bring Vitamin pills! That way you don't need to worry about the miccronutrients in you food, and can choose foods based on macronutrients.

I select backpacking foods based on calories per gram. So far creamed coconut is the most calorie dense (at 7 cal/gram) food that I've been able to find. My favorite backpacking foods are: Minute rice mixed with creamed coconut and Thai curry paste, dried sausages, cheese, chocolate, shortbread (ok, not quite paleo... But you can make a savory version that functions well as a cracker)

532cfd279d793e8fcc23b9f6d91dde5c

(1981)

on January 23, 2013
at 02:40 AM

I'm thru-hiking the American Discovery Trail, from California to Delaware

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