1

votes

Coconut fat for cooking

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 07, 2010 at 10:55 AM

How does it differ from coconut edible oil ?

I have just purchased this product from Eden.

http://www.eden.de/eden/produkte/Fette/oel_fett/cocosfett.php

It's a solid block at room temp and on the label it says "not chemically hardened" but it has no taste so I'm not sure if this is any good or if it contains any trans fat ?

For my german friends:

http://forum.logi-methode.de/index.php?page=Thread&postID=93708

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:17 AM

Not sure what your point is. TT's web site does talk about industrially refined coconut oils. Maybe not the page I linked, but it's there. As for baking with it, I've not seen many cookie, cake, or crust recipes that didn't call for a lot of shortening. So yeah, one is going to taste it, which is what I said.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:49 AM

Unfortunately there is more - the refine oils often use harsh chemicals to purify, deodorize and what not. After having first regular refined, and then organic virgin - I never go back. It might be more expensive, but the difference in quality is amazing. and the smell/taste is gone/lost when used in baking or cooking. Unless you are using really a lot.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:46 AM

same for me! recently a new jar came, and it was completely liquid - a tell tale about the heat outside! I am happy it is semi-solid now, which means the weather gets better :)

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on September 09, 2010
at 10:01 PM

If it's melting point is higher than 24, it has been hydrogenated, and thus includes some transfats. Not good. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_oil#Hydrogenated

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on April 07, 2010
at 08:36 PM

Heat processing is not a problem. As long as the coconut oil is pearl white, it has not been heated past its smoke point--which is around 350 F See the frequently asked questions (FAQ) at http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/faq.htm The oil to not use for cooking is Olive Oil.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 07, 2010
at 06:04 PM

But would be heat processed (refined) bad for oils ?

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6 Answers

2
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on September 09, 2010
at 10:15 PM

robins announce springtime, liquid coconut oil tells me its time to turn the AC on- oh how Paleo is that?

Use lots- its such a wonderful food and buy it whenever it is on sale- it doesn't go bad, great on skin and many MANY other things to

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:46 AM

same for me! recently a new jar came, and it was completely liquid - a tell tale about the heat outside! I am happy it is semi-solid now, which means the weather gets better :)

2
F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on September 09, 2010
at 10:04 PM

If its melting point is higher than 24??C, it has been hydrogenated, and thus includes some transfats.

See article on wikipedia and this hack.

2
Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on April 07, 2010
at 02:52 PM

coconut oil IS solid at room temperature. Refined(heat processed) coconut oil is supposed to be tasteless while cold-pressed oil still retains a slight coconut flavor. I'm guessing this coconut oil(fat) is refined.

1
4ff24fb9a7d48305681487dfb8040a5e

(383)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:47 PM

From what I could read on Eden's homepage: What they refer to as Kokosfett is the refined version of coconut oil which shouldn't have any trans fats in them. It naturally hardens below 24 degrees Celsius. Indulge :-)

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on April 07, 2010
at 03:13 PM

More than you ever wanted to know about coconut oil is at the Tropical Traditions site.

The refined oils are better for baking or cooking where you want an oil/fat, but don't want the coconut flavor coming through. The unrefined are better for frying or garnish where the coconut flavor is a pleasant addition. Another nice thing about unrefined coconut oil is you can easily smell and taste quality.

I will add, a few weeks ago Tropical Traditions was giving away a pint jar of their Gold Label oil with an additional purchase. I placed an order to give it a try (it is somewhat expensive otherwise) and was amazed at the difference. The aroma and flavor are fresh and great. I liken it to a coconut flower if coconuts had flowers. I use it just like I would butter. I even joke with my wife, who unfortunately doesn't like coconut, by calling it coconut butter.

A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

(4896)

on September 10, 2010
at 02:49 AM

Unfortunately there is more - the refine oils often use harsh chemicals to purify, deodorize and what not. After having first regular refined, and then organic virgin - I never go back. It might be more expensive, but the difference in quality is amazing. and the smell/taste is gone/lost when used in baking or cooking. Unless you are using really a lot.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on September 12, 2010
at 06:17 AM

Not sure what your point is. TT's web site does talk about industrially refined coconut oils. Maybe not the page I linked, but it's there. As for baking with it, I've not seen many cookie, cake, or crust recipes that didn't call for a lot of shortening. So yeah, one is going to taste it, which is what I said.

0
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on April 07, 2010
at 03:07 PM

Yes, a translation of the webpage shows that the Eden product is refined. It turns to liquid at 35 celsius or 76-77 F. And this product is edible and a great source of fat for cooking.

A Yahoo translation to German: Ja zeigt eine Übersetzung der Webseite, dass das Eden-Produkt verfeinert wird. Sie wendet sich an Flüssigkeit bei 35 Celsius oder 76-77 F. Und dieses Produkt ist essbar und eine große Quelle des Fettes für das Kochen.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on April 07, 2010
at 08:36 PM

Heat processing is not a problem. As long as the coconut oil is pearl white, it has not been heated past its smoke point--which is around 350 F See the frequently asked questions (FAQ) at http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/faq.htm The oil to not use for cooking is Olive Oil.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 07, 2010
at 06:04 PM

But would be heat processed (refined) bad for oils ?

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on September 09, 2010
at 10:01 PM

If it's melting point is higher than 24, it has been hydrogenated, and thus includes some transfats. Not good. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_oil#Hydrogenated

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