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Can you recommend a good book on environmental toxins?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 10, 2012 at 8:40 PM

I'm curious for my own health what I can do to avoid environmental toxins, but much more importantly, I'm curious for my two little sisters, ages 3 and 4. I spent some time last night reading Wikipedia's webpage for BPA. I have always tried to avoid BPA products in general, but I haven't been very diligent. Reading the BPA entry on Wikipedia made me furious though. My god, this really is a serious issue. I encourage everyone to take a peak at it. I was especially concerned about young and chemically vulnerable sisters and their developing minds.

So, anyone have any recommendations on books to get a good overview of what we can do to eliminate these horribly dangerous yet unregulated monsters - chemical toxins?

EDIT: I should add that I have suffered from issues that may be related to this. At 20 yrs old, I have had my testosterone levels tested 5 times, each time coming back in the 280-400 ng/dl range. Anyone who knows a bit about this would recognize that that is a frighteningly low number for a twenty year old. So my xenoestrogen concerns are high personally.

97ffbac59e88bdff6495d0a9b6f70ff7

(555)

on March 14, 2012
at 02:47 AM

These are great recommendations, thank you Invisible Caveman

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 11, 2012
at 02:42 PM

That's good to hear. I'm about to read PHD and that will be enough diet books for awhile, then it's on to the environmental stuff :)

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on March 11, 2012
at 02:35 PM

I thought Slow Death by Rubber Duck was great and had come onto this thread to recommend it.

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6 Answers

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1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on March 10, 2012
at 09:11 PM

This may be helpful: http://www.amazon.com/Hormone-soup-xenoestrogens-environmental-pollutants/dp/B000BGX0VE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331413618&sr=1-1

Also, here is an excerpt from a blog post I just wrote about optimum fertility (and pertinent to your concern):

"Xenoestrogens are another potent hormone disruptor. We are designed to have a progesterone-dominant hormonal balance. Pro-gest = pro-gestation! Xenoestrogens can upset this balance. These estrogen look-alikes bond to your estrogen receptors and create an estrogen-dominant environment that can contribute to PCOS, hypothyroidism, endometriosis, reduced sperm count & motility and other reproductive ailments.

Eliminating xenoestrogens is not possible, but we can reduce our exposure. Here are some suggestions:

Eat organic, free-range, hormone-free meat & dairy products. Eat organic vegetables to avoid pesticide exposure.

Replace all cleaning supplies with organic/natural ingredients/paraben-free/chlorine-free. Avoid commercial dryer sheets.

Make sure all hair & body products are paraben-free. Use henna instead of hair dyes, use low-toxicity nail products. Avoid most commercial sunscreens.

Reduce your exposure to BPA & phthalates by using glass containers for food storage, metal or glass water bottles and choosing BPA-free canned & packaged goods.

Use a water filter designed to filter out chlorine & other chemicals.

Sleep on a mattress/futon that is free of commercial fire retardants."

3
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on March 11, 2012
at 12:38 PM

Not books (well some online), but some more web articles that may help with things to avoid. Some of these of written for women since xeno-estrogens cause lots of problems for women's health. The things to avoid are the same though.

http://www.nobreastcyst.com/xeno.html (try to ignore the color scheme and ads)

http://books.google.com/books?id=HDPfibh8iWoC&lpg=PP1&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false It's an online book about endocrine disruptors in wastewater etc. Chapter 2 is a list of sources of endocrine disruptors.

http://www.chec.pitt.edu/Exposure_concentration_of_Xenoestrogen_in_pharmaceutical_and_Municipal_Wastewater__Final8-28-07[1].pdf

http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/health/researchareas/environmenthealth/ieh/ieh%20publications/a4.pdf Chapter 3 (pg 87 on)

http://books.google.com/books?id=CDy3DOwvqGcC&lpg=PA426&dq=xenoestrogens&pg=PA426#v=onepage&q=xenoestrogens&f=false Section 17.6 pg 426

Since you have access to a university library, go consult with one of the reference librarians. If your university offers bio-science or med courses, they probably have a health science librarian who specializes in research in that field. Let them know what you want, including all the particulars and at what level. It may be helpful to know where you have lived to see what environmental exposure you might have had through the years. If your library doesn't have a health sciences librarian, there are many health science libraries in NYC, and if you search online for health science libraries, you will find that many also have online talk to a librarian features. While they can't give you med advice, they can really help with your research.

+++ You should have decent access to health services through your university - get them going on the low testosterone etc problems. If they can't, you are probably in the best city in the world to find specialists and studies. Your university health center should be able to help you find them. If not, check with the health sciences libraries/librarians. Again, they can't recommend, but they can help you find listings of practitioners, and also evaluations.

+++ List of health sciences libraries in NY state, including NYC http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/libraries/newyork.html

+++ Ask a health science librarian google search - lots of people to chat with -https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ix=seb&ie=UTF-8&ion=1#hl=en&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=ask%20a%20health%20science%20librarian&oq=&aq=&aqi=&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&gs_l=&pbx=1&fp=e50b7ed8b228eb18&ix=seb&ion=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1366&bih=681

2
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 11, 2012
at 02:25 PM

Not actual recommendations as I haven't read them yet, but these two are on my radar:

The Hundred-Year Lie: How to Protect Yourself from the Chemicals That Are Destroying Your Health

Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things

Sometimes books like this may seem a bit alarmist, but I'll read them and extract whatever I find useful or practical and leave it at that.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on March 11, 2012
at 02:35 PM

I thought Slow Death by Rubber Duck was great and had come onto this thread to recommend it.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 11, 2012
at 02:42 PM

That's good to hear. I'm about to read PHD and that will be enough diet books for awhile, then it's on to the environmental stuff :)

97ffbac59e88bdff6495d0a9b6f70ff7

(555)

on March 14, 2012
at 02:47 AM

These are great recommendations, thank you Invisible Caveman

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on March 11, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Debra Lynn Dadd's site might be of use:

http://debralynndadd.com/

She has much information on having a toxic-free house, recovering from Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, and related topics.

1
E0b58cce5630512fbf21103829b667e1

on March 10, 2012
at 11:18 PM

Book called clean, green and lean by Dr Walter Crinnion who is a naturopathic physician. He talks about getting rid of the toxins.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 10, 2012
at 08:57 PM

I can't, sorry. I will say there are resources on Google but I would be leery of going to far down that particular rabbit hole. It's frustrating but the world we live in is filled with toxins and if you start digging you are going to find yourself constantly surrounded. For me it just leads to a certain amount of whig-out. I found myself looking at those systems that remove everything from the water and reintroduce minerals in the ideal amount etc...

I try to stick with simple things like avoiding plastic and cans. Eat organic when feasible. Avoid food and products from China.

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