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Vitamin K Toxicity?

Commented on March 17, 2014
Created March 16, 2014 at 9:13 PM

Is there any known dose of oral vitamin k which is toxic and if so at what dose does this occur and what are the symptoms?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 17, 2014
at 08:43 PM

L o l .

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on March 17, 2014
at 07:47 PM

Thank you!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2014
at 07:33 PM

Fixed your text for you! :)

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 17, 2014
at 05:30 PM

sounds like you've got the recipe for some pretty expensive urine -- but unlikely anything more dangerous.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 17, 2014
at 12:30 AM

I want other people's input before I consider taking some 50mg (not mcg) k1 pills I bought though, lol. That just seems like a high dose. So I won't solely be relying on my own intuition and Googling skills.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 17, 2014
at 12:29 AM

I did my fair share of research and I couldn't find any official tolerable upper intake or any studies showing toxicity for either vitamin k1 or k2. The reasoning from what I read is that all vitamin K does is carboloxylate certain proteins. If it carboxylates 100% then it can't do anything else. So unlike vitamin d which actually increases production of certain proteins, k just activates them, implying that not only may k protect against d toxicity but it should necessarily be non toxic (at least by that one mechanism).

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2 Answers

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3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 16, 2014
at 11:34 PM

I'm sure you googled it and looked at the second result, but if not....

Given the strong track record of safety, the National Academy of Sciences did not choose to establish a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for vitamin K. Further evidence for the safety of dietary vitamin K comes from research studies where doses of vitamin K at 500 times the Adequate Intake (AI) did not lead to observable toxicity.

-- http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=112#toxicitysymptoms

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 17, 2014
at 12:29 AM

I did my fair share of research and I couldn't find any official tolerable upper intake or any studies showing toxicity for either vitamin k1 or k2. The reasoning from what I read is that all vitamin K does is carboloxylate certain proteins. If it carboxylates 100% then it can't do anything else. So unlike vitamin d which actually increases production of certain proteins, k just activates them, implying that not only may k protect against d toxicity but it should necessarily be non toxic (at least by that one mechanism).

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 17, 2014
at 12:30 AM

I want other people's input before I consider taking some 50mg (not mcg) k1 pills I bought though, lol. That just seems like a high dose. So I won't solely be relying on my own intuition and Googling skills.

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on March 16, 2014
at 11:27 PM

In the article you cited in your other question was this statement: Although the natural K1 and all K2 homologues have proven nontoxic, the synthetic form K3 (menadione) has shown toxicity, K4, and K5 are also nontoxic.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 17, 2014
at 07:33 PM

Fixed your text for you! :)

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