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How safe are toothbrushes?

Commented on February 11, 2014
Created February 11, 2014 at 6:16 PM

I got to thinking... most toothbrushes are plastic and flexible, which might mean that they have some hormone-mimicking chemicals (not sure if BPA or phthalates, or something else?). Do you think that I should be concerned about putting that stuff in my mouth? If it can leach into my mouth, will it get absorbed through my mucosa? And would that be a relevant dose?

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on February 11, 2014
at 09:19 PM

Very informative, thanks.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on February 11, 2014
at 09:08 PM

Thanks, that sounds promising. I think I will experiment with those sticks as well as ultrasoft brushes and see what wins out.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on February 11, 2014
at 07:28 PM

Mine cost £1 each off ebay, each stick lasts about a week so im looking at £4-5 a month maximum, my teeth are definitely brighter as i have a white crown and slightly aged/yellowish teeth which are slowly matching the colour of the crown, the fact they have lost their over-sensitivity is pretty encouraging aswell, i can swish ice cold water no problem. Give it a go and then just run your tongue over your teeth, can't argue with how good that feels after using the stick.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on February 11, 2014
at 07:13 PM

Yes, I have been considering Miswak sticks. Where do you order yours? I'd be interested in the price.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on February 11, 2014
at 07:13 PM

I won't downvote silly replies, but I think we would all appreciate thoughtful replies that are not dismissive without providing evidence.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on February 11, 2014
at 06:58 PM

Not sure about safety but i don't like plastic brushes or paste at all so i use the root of the tree salvadora persica, and since using it regularly my teeth feel cleaner, look brighter and aren't sensitive anymore, it just takes more effort, but its worth it

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3 Answers

best answer

0
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on February 11, 2014
at 08:30 PM

Cost of quality vs cost of non-conformance.

In the grand scheme of things and considering chemical / plastic exposure due to modern life via food packaging, other plastic products, etc ... I would posit that toothbrushes as further down the list of problem products, however, if you've already eliminated other exposures / uses, you might take a look at www.lifewithoutplastics.com and search for toothbrushes.

I would have pasted the direct link but copy & paste does not seem to work for me lately on PH. wtf?

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on February 11, 2014
at 09:19 PM

Very informative, thanks.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on February 11, 2014
at 06:46 PM

Can be dangerous if you poke yourself in the eye. Otherwise use it or go outside and find some evergreen shrubs to brush with (partially joking here).

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on February 11, 2014
at 06:32 PM

You might be taking it a bit too far. Please don't stop brushing your teeth, cavities are far worse than toothbrushes (and so is bad breath).

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