14

votes

Food tips that make our lives easier/cheaper. Do share

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 05, 2012 at 7:18 AM

Here are mine, I hope to learn from you guys too. Do share:

To incorporate gelatin into diet, just add the powder into any hot liquids (broths, hot milk drinks, hot teas)

Save tea bags by freezing them for reuse

Boil expired eggs (if the eggs float in the water, that means they're pretty old. Toss them. If they sink to the bottom, they're still fresh, and if they "stand" in the water vertically, they are good for boiling)

Save bones and bone scraps of poultry, steaks, and other meats. For example, bones of fried chicken, and grilled ribs. Boil them in water for two hours minimum for broth.

If popcorn is stale and not as crunchy anymore, add the popcorn to soups.

To cure headache instead of buying tylenol, use a teaspoon of vinegar with some honey added, or a teaspoon of brewed coffee (I don't drink any sort of caffeine so coffee is pretty potent on me)

8e10b687e328468783a72c55b64710e8

(1453)

on August 07, 2012
at 03:09 AM

What's wrong with popcorn? Isn't that a safe starch?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 06, 2012
at 11:38 AM

I keep a frozen duck in reserve...thawed I strip off the leg quarters for smoking, the breasts for pan frying (maigret or smoked tea duck) then roast the carcass to recover the fat and any meat and skin left. I do this at 400F to get a good rendering of fat and to crisp the skin, for about an hour.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 06, 2012
at 11:32 AM

We would do the same thing with leaf lettuce and harvest with a pair of scissors. I don't know about kale but if the rabbits get to lettuce it's all over.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 06, 2012
at 01:00 AM

I do the gelatin in hot liquids thing, also save bones for broth. Haven't needed any pain killers in as long as I remember being paleo. :)

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:33 AM

Pre-primal, I didn't have a particular problem with beans and ate them several times a week. After visiting New Orleans a few weeks ago and NEEDING to eat those red beans and rice... yeah that totally happened to me. Lucky for my hotel roommate I wasn't smelly, but it was happening a lot and was pretty uncomfortable and embarrassing. Still totally worth it, though, freakin delicious.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on August 05, 2012
at 11:19 PM

I can get away with a lot of "non-paleo" cheats without adverse affects, but beans and I do not mix. The last time I ate them I voluntarily slept on the couch so my wife wouldn't have to be be exposed to the toxic fumes emanating from my body.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on August 05, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Cheap cuts + slow cooker = good eats

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Much as I love beans myself, they are definitely not healthy by Paleo standards. Soaking definitely helps, though, and when I "cheat" with them I always make sure to soak them at least 24 hours. :)

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:02 PM

I want to do this to make my own backpacking foods, but haven't gotten around to it.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on August 05, 2012
at 07:31 PM

You can have another bag to save the bones from chicken thighs and legs and the like, so you can wait until you have enough to make a nice stock.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on August 05, 2012
at 07:29 PM

The bones and remnants make for a great stock when you're done, too.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on August 05, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Wow. A yard full of thyme would smell so ridiculously good. When we finally buy a house I'm going to do it with that and mint outside my veggie garden area so that I never have to mow anything.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Kale is beautiful to line walkways with!

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:19 PM

+2 for a good list, -1 for popcorn ;-)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on August 05, 2012
at 03:26 PM

Plus, after cooling some very tasty fat can be skimmed off and used for ffuture sauteeing/frying etc...

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on August 05, 2012
at 02:31 PM

I've seen people do it with thyme and it's beautiful, but never heard of it with kale :)

0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:40 PM

Our backyard resembles this tip! We still have a teensy bit of "cosmetic" grass, but the rest of the yard is commandeered by chard, kale, lettuces, basil, rosemary, garlic, tomatoes, pepper plants etc. etc. etc. We don't bother with plants that are not edible. :)

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:23 PM

I see you're from Australia: what is your climate like? I've had a heck of a time trying to grow spinach here in Boston, US.

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on August 05, 2012
at 12:19 PM

When I get home I'll post a pic of my backyard for you :)

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on August 05, 2012
at 12:05 PM

Hmm? Do you actually do this? Pictures please. !!!

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8 Answers

9
584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on August 05, 2012
at 07:52 AM

Grow spinach or kale as though it was grass. This also saves time from mowing

0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:40 PM

Our backyard resembles this tip! We still have a teensy bit of "cosmetic" grass, but the rest of the yard is commandeered by chard, kale, lettuces, basil, rosemary, garlic, tomatoes, pepper plants etc. etc. etc. We don't bother with plants that are not edible. :)

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:23 PM

I see you're from Australia: what is your climate like? I've had a heck of a time trying to grow spinach here in Boston, US.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Kale is beautiful to line walkways with!

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on August 05, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Wow. A yard full of thyme would smell so ridiculously good. When we finally buy a house I'm going to do it with that and mint outside my veggie garden area so that I never have to mow anything.

584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on August 05, 2012
at 12:19 PM

When I get home I'll post a pic of my backyard for you :)

C0c839648b31512515daaffe8e4e9ad1

(468)

on August 05, 2012
at 12:05 PM

Hmm? Do you actually do this? Pictures please. !!!

C8b2136ef95ba6aac211825ff38cc0e9

(971)

on August 05, 2012
at 02:31 PM

I've seen people do it with thyme and it's beautiful, but never heard of it with kale :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 06, 2012
at 11:32 AM

We would do the same thing with leaf lettuce and harvest with a pair of scissors. I don't know about kale but if the rabbits get to lettuce it's all over.

5
Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

on August 05, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Save all the ends and trimmings of your vegetables to add to your stock. Just put a large freezer bag in your freezer and start filling it up. When it's all full of onion/celery/carrot trimmings, a few other odds and ends from other vegetables, you know it's time to make some more stock. This way, very little goes to waste.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on August 05, 2012
at 07:31 PM

You can have another bag to save the bones from chicken thighs and legs and the like, so you can wait until you have enough to make a nice stock.

5
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 05, 2012
at 04:32 PM

Buy a whole bird (chicken, game hen, turkey, duck). It tastes way better when cooked whole with all the bones and skin on. Cheaper, too. Leftovers are your friend.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on August 05, 2012
at 07:29 PM

The bones and remnants make for a great stock when you're done, too.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 06, 2012
at 11:38 AM

I keep a frozen duck in reserve...thawed I strip off the leg quarters for smoking, the breasts for pan frying (maigret or smoked tea duck) then roast the carcass to recover the fat and any meat and skin left. I do this at 400F to get a good rendering of fat and to crisp the skin, for about an hour.

5
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 05, 2012
at 12:44 PM

Buy big cuts of meat and butcher yourself (Whole Chicken/ Turkey, Short Loin, Plate, Rib, etc). It's really not hard, and you can typically get the large cuts for half to a quarter of the chops.

Also, get a meat grinder, a lot of these big cuts have lower quality cuts that you don't want to use as a steak -- meat grinder allows you to turn into sausage/ burgers and use the whole cut.

Also, learn how to roast, you can get a brisket or rump cut pretty cheap (from cow, but pig and lamb are the same) and roast it until it breaks down.

4
Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:24 PM

If you slow-cook cheap cuts of meat, they taste as good as expensive cuts of meat. And if you do this for a cut that has fairly small bones (especially chicken), you can just eat the bones with the rest of the meat, saving yourself the time of making bone broth separately. After 8-10 hours of cooking, they're soft enough to just crunch right down.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on August 05, 2012
at 03:26 PM

Plus, after cooling some very tasty fat can be skimmed off and used for ffuture sauteeing/frying etc...

Medium avatar

(19469)

on August 05, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Cheap cuts + slow cooker = good eats

3
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on August 05, 2012
at 01:49 PM

We buy bulk organic vegetables from places like Azure Standard and local co-ops and spend a day prepping and dehydrating food in my Excalibur. I have 2 and 5-gallon gamma seal buckets full of dehydrated diced potatoes, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, onions, etc. Just soak them in some water (or better yet, bone broth) to rehydrate and use as usual. Or skip the rehydrating and toss directly into a soup or stew. Very convenient.

Maybe not much of a time saver (it's a LOT of prep work!) but it's most definitely a money saver.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:02 PM

I want to do this to make my own backpacking foods, but haven't gotten around to it.

0
918ecd2369c4e8cd6a2d66846c20137c

on August 06, 2012
at 12:28 AM

  1. Chest freezer is a must. I got a slightly used one on Craigslist for $80 [7cf].

  2. Wait for sales and then buy in bulk [and stick in the freezer or fridge if needed].

  3. Some veggies last for a long time in the fridge - for instance, when I see yams for $.50/lbs, I'll buy like 20lbs.

  4. Find cheap sources, and then buy in bulk. For instance I buy my coconut oil in 5 gallon buckets and I buy coconut milk/cream by the case from a local Asian grocer [philamfood.com].

  5. CSA veggies - great price and more than we can eat. My wife freezes and preserves the excess each week and we eat it all winter. Same for u-pick fruit. Strawberry, then blueberry, then apple.

  6. Organ meats are incredibly cheap. I grind up liver (& kidney) and mix with ground beef, and no one even notices [usually].

  7. Cheap cuts + slow cooker = cheap + simple + delicious.

  8. For the past 6 mos I have been IF'ing on most days with a feeding window btwn 5-8pm. It's really make a huge difference in my day-to-day lifestyle - it's amazing how much it simplifies things.

0
Ec792bda217175243c50205e1e6126f5

on August 05, 2012
at 10:38 PM

Making beans makes life easier for me. I soak them in water overnight for about 15-24. It's easy just put the beans (pinto, kidney, black, etc) in a big pot and cover them in water and seal with a tight lid.

The next day I drain the dirty water out and replace with clean water/chicken stock and boil on low for about 3 hours. I also add onions, garlic, salt and pepper. The beans last for 3 days and I just re-heat them. You can have them as a side dish with lunch and they are so healthy because soaking them allows for better digestion and it brings out the nutrients. Beans a are loaded with fiber!

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 06, 2012
at 12:33 AM

Pre-primal, I didn't have a particular problem with beans and ate them several times a week. After visiting New Orleans a few weeks ago and NEEDING to eat those red beans and rice... yeah that totally happened to me. Lucky for my hotel roommate I wasn't smelly, but it was happening a lot and was pretty uncomfortable and embarrassing. Still totally worth it, though, freakin delicious.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 05, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Much as I love beans myself, they are definitely not healthy by Paleo standards. Soaking definitely helps, though, and when I "cheat" with them I always make sure to soak them at least 24 hours. :)

Medium avatar

(19469)

on August 05, 2012
at 11:19 PM

I can get away with a lot of "non-paleo" cheats without adverse affects, but beans and I do not mix. The last time I ate them I voluntarily slept on the couch so my wife wouldn't have to be be exposed to the toxic fumes emanating from my body.

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