1

votes

Hack my Thyroid Results

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 02, 2012 at 3:38 AM

I've been prescribed Armour Thyroid, slowly increasing the dose since Aug 2011. I started at 1g, 1.5g, now at 2g.

I had my tests results come back and my TSH is 0.02 and Free T4 is 0.76. I haven't received feedback from my doctor yet, but TSH seems out of range. Does low TSH suggest hyperthyroid?

I still feel some symptoms of Hypothyroid -

  • Cold feet but not cold hands like before
  • Chronic constipation on low carb even though eating lots of veggies and drinking lots of water
  • Very dry skin, scaly cracked feet, dry scalp.
  • Very brittle nails
  • Weak muscle feelings occasionally to the point where I constantly drop things
  • Low libido, used to be very high
  • Very forgetful, can't remember words and names of people and completely blank out.
  • Depression
  • Hard time losing weights
  • More hungry later at night

Not sure what to think, any insight is helpful.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:51 PM

Agreed....I have been pimping this book lately, but it really is awesome for understanding hypothyroidism http://www.amazon.com/Still-Thyroid-Symptoms-Tests-Normal/dp/1600376703

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 02, 2012
at 10:24 AM

The analogy of the house thermostat is right on. A couple years after my doc gets me sorted out on T3, I end up in a hospital for a gut issue and the hospital endocrinologist comes in with entourage. It goes like this- "Did you know that your TSH is 200?" "Doesn't matter." "Oh yes, it's very bad, we need to make you an appointment." "My doc doesn't look at TSH, it's meaningless. My thyroid just does nothing. Checking TSH on a broken thyroid makes no sense. Look at all the other numbers, they are in line right?" "Oh. They are. Have a nice day!"

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6 Answers

2
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on March 02, 2012
at 07:57 AM

Armour contains T3, which depresses TSH very effectively. Mine is undetectable on the local equivalent of about 4 grain.

AS DFH said, you (and your doctor) should go by free T3 and symptoms. Speaking of which, your symptoms sound rather hypothyroid.

Think of it like this: TSH is like the thermostat in your house. Now your heating system (your thyroid) is broken, so you supplement by lighting a fire in your fireplace. Would you look at the thermostat to decide if you throw another log on the fire???

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:51 PM

Agreed....I have been pimping this book lately, but it really is awesome for understanding hypothyroidism http://www.amazon.com/Still-Thyroid-Symptoms-Tests-Normal/dp/1600376703

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 02, 2012
at 10:24 AM

The analogy of the house thermostat is right on. A couple years after my doc gets me sorted out on T3, I end up in a hospital for a gut issue and the hospital endocrinologist comes in with entourage. It goes like this- "Did you know that your TSH is 200?" "Doesn't matter." "Oh yes, it's very bad, we need to make you an appointment." "My doc doesn't look at TSH, it's meaningless. My thyroid just does nothing. Checking TSH on a broken thyroid makes no sense. Look at all the other numbers, they are in line right?" "Oh. They are. Have a nice day!"

1
E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:27 AM

TSH is bunk. Your doc could be looking at T3 to get a better indication of what's going on. Symptoms matter more than TSH! My doc went for T3 alone, the desiccated T3 I guess. I would read up on adrenal fatigue and read those symptoms too. Drs will miss an adrenal or other hormone problem because they were trained to focus on a simple approach to thyroid. If weight and/or symptoms are really stubborn, you want to know rT3, the thyroid number that also reflects your leptin sensitivity, and that's trendy!

Also, when things were bad, my cortisol crapped out and went down, couldn't make it in the adrenals. My earlier thyroid docs missed it.

0
9b47142b8ed1074a94b5654410740530

on March 02, 2012
at 02:27 PM

Thyroid meds can help a hypothyroid patient only so much. It's diet and lifestyle that are going to have the biggest impact on your health. You most-likely have an autoimmune thyroid problem. You need lots of omega 3 fat in your diet and you need to decrease omega 6. About 6 TBS per day of coconut oil will help your constipation, dry skin, etc. You also need to think about removing all starches from your diet, since these trigger autoimmune responses. No gluten, no corn, no potatoes, no cornstarch, etc. Not forever, just for a few months, and then you can slowly add them back one by one and see what happens. With the exception of gluten. Huge trigger for autoimmune responses. So for autoimmune thyroid problems, the two most important changes to make are: Omega3/Omega6 balance and remove all starches. Think grassfed beef for the omega3, and get the chicken out of your diet (skin is high in omega 6). Oh, one more thing ... get to bed before 10PM and wake up before 6AM. If you can, take a walk in the morning sunshine so you can soak up some of the most potent vitamin d available.

0
93b5fc3a75c76817eed3f43831471cec

(140)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:08 PM

It might be worth thinking about thyroid hormone resistance. Have you checked your reverse T3? If this is too high in relation to T3 it prevents T3 from doing its job and thus you can have hypo symptoms while having normal TSH/T3/T4 test results.

Also, how's your diet? And how long have you been eating paleo? Some people (myself included) find they need a lot less thyroid replacement to feel optimal when on strict paleo. While I don't know exact mechanisms, I suspect gluten/n6 mediated inflammation has a big effect on cellular uptake of thyroid hormones.

I agree that TSH is bunk the way most docs use it, but I don't think it's never relevant. In other words, if your TSH is low and your T3/T4 normal but you still have hypo symptoms, I don't think you should necessarily conclude you're on too little replacement.

Hope this helps.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:56 AM

My endocronologist uses how I feel not what my TSH level is to regulate dosage of my Acella (desiccated thyroid). If you have symptoms of hypothyroidism you are not over medicated.

My TSH is also low but I have no hyperthyroid symptoms whatsoever. I am currently on 3 grains.

0
D80e105afbd746f5c7d749a5ffd9e280

on March 02, 2012
at 04:37 AM

What was your TSH before starting on the Armour? And what is your T3 and free T3 level? Did you just begin taking Armour in 2011? The company changed the formulation of Armour in 2009 and many people who had been successfully managing their hypothyroidism with the old formula began experiencing both hypo and hyper symptoms on the new formula (weight gain, low TSH, heart palpitations, feeling cold, etc.). You might want to ask your doc to prescribe a different brand name of desiccated thyroid.

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