6

votes

Thermoregulation

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 07, 2011 at 4:14 AM

Random question, if we sleep in a colder room, for example, will our body respond by ramping up basal metabolism to create more heat as a byproduct? or will it store more fat to keep us warm?

My guess would be acute cold exposures ramp up our metabolism and chronic cold makes us store fat?

thanks

p.s. I looked at a similar question on here but it didn't quite answer what I was looking for.

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:48 PM

maybe im just screwed for life...

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 08, 2011
at 09:39 PM

I've heard that theory, but I have pretty much zero symptoms of leptin resistance. I am underweight, lean, and have a history of having a small appetite and feeling ill/overfull very easily from eating.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 07:12 PM

@ The Quilt OK I am sorry I misunderstood, but I am not understanding what your objections are to my attempt at a summary. I suppose I will just have to give up trying :)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 07:03 PM

@Vrimj. did not say anything you posted. That was what you thought you heard or your perception. Sleep is coupled to metabolism but has zero to do with temperature regulation. body temp regulation is a brain only function. Melatonin decreases overall body temp and is why we need to cover ourselves when we sleep.....because we do decrease our body temp when we sleep......if you sweat like a pig when you sleep......that is a key sign of leptin resistance or hormonal dysregulation. leptin and thyroid hormones control the use of excess calories by UCP 1 and 3 proteins as I laid out.....

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 06:36 PM

@Mallory I don't know, but it might be interesting to see is Melatonin before bed made you less sweaty at night...

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 06:35 PM

@Jeff I am not an expert but my understanding is that your body has a setting to turn food in to pure heat and can use this if the hormonal regulation system is not too broken to warm you up in a cold place. That is the idea expressed here http://hypothermics.com/home/ and to the best of my understanding the linkage to leptin (which regulates the ATP or Heat switch in cells) that The Quilt was making.

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:25 PM

so when you fix to go to bed, and say...30 mins later your sweatin up a storm... does that mean no melatonin aka leptin problems? i sweat like a pig when i go to bed

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 07, 2011
at 03:58 PM

That is a great explanation, but I was curious really how different sleeping (and living) temperatures affect what is happening.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Ok correct me if I am wrong, but it sounds like you are saying that the same signals that make you sleepy make your body turn down the heat production for repair the immune and nervous system, but that in deep sleep, around 3am there is a surge that sets up the thyroid and growth hormone, the heat and muscle building signals for the next day by preloading your body with the necessary hormones?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 01:12 PM

to understand something sometimes we have to elevate our sense of awareness and many times I will try to make it easily digestible. This is one topic that i dont want you to get right away. I want you to realize that you need to go deeper to get the WHY this happens. Sleep is a big target for me. How it interacts with biology is incredibly complex. I gave you the briefest outline of it i could without any details. The details will come but I have been warned not to get into the details of things here at PH because that is not how the site is designed. So I hacked it as I was asked to.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:58 PM

In chapter 1, Leptin, The Quilt says that many thyroid problems are actually leptin resistance problems http://www.jackkruse.com

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:53 PM

You need to read his blog http://www.jackkruse.com about leptin. He hasn't talked yet about thermoregulation but if it has to do with leptin, he will talk about it in time.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:53 PM

You need to read his blog www.jackkruse.com about leptin. He hasn't talked yet about thermoregulation but if it has to do with leptin, he will talk about it in time.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:20 AM

This answer sounds really good, but to be honest, I have no idea what you just said. I think I translated it to be that cold air and a warm blanket is ideal?

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:15 AM

quilt could you dumb down your answer? ive read like 5 times and have no idea what you said.. but im interested in it

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:12 AM

you should check out the 4 hour body by tim ferris.. whole chapter on this.. really interesting

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:00 AM

you ask......i hack

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:00 AM

holy cow. talk about a ten dollar answer to a 10 cent question! thx

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4 Answers

9
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 04:51 AM

Body temp is controlled by hypothalamus......and leptin status.

So you ever wonder why we wear blankets when we sleep? Melatonin lowers our body temp.

After 4 hrs of melatonin secretion....leptin enters the hypothalamus and effects lateral tracts to immediately send a thyroid signal to upregulate T3 and T4 which coupled with leptin act peripherally in muscles at the UCP3 sites......to burn fat to make ATP or to burn off excess calories as pure heat. This occurs after our prolactin surg from 12 to 3 AM.....immediately after it is over......GH i stimulated during autophagic sleep in stage 3 and 4.....to increase protein synthesis for muscle growth......all while your disapating heat.

The reduced temp....is needed for CNS autophagic repair and the quantum effects on microtubules that facilitate learning and neuronal spouting.

The immune system is also undergoing autophagic repair......that is another reason why the temp has to fall. Temp raises immune function in fever.......

Its all leptin.......and the brain.

That is why brain surgery is cool. Its my experimental lab.

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:25 PM

so when you fix to go to bed, and say...30 mins later your sweatin up a storm... does that mean no melatonin aka leptin problems? i sweat like a pig when i go to bed

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 06:35 PM

@Jeff I am not an expert but my understanding is that your body has a setting to turn food in to pure heat and can use this if the hormonal regulation system is not too broken to warm you up in a cold place. That is the idea expressed here http://hypothermics.com/home/ and to the best of my understanding the linkage to leptin (which regulates the ATP or Heat switch in cells) that The Quilt was making.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:15 AM

quilt could you dumb down your answer? ive read like 5 times and have no idea what you said.. but im interested in it

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:00 AM

holy cow. talk about a ten dollar answer to a 10 cent question! thx

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Ok correct me if I am wrong, but it sounds like you are saying that the same signals that make you sleepy make your body turn down the heat production for repair the immune and nervous system, but that in deep sleep, around 3am there is a surge that sets up the thyroid and growth hormone, the heat and muscle building signals for the next day by preloading your body with the necessary hormones?

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 06:36 PM

@Mallory I don't know, but it might be interesting to see is Melatonin before bed made you less sweaty at night...

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:00 AM

you ask......i hack

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on June 07, 2011
at 07:12 PM

@ The Quilt OK I am sorry I misunderstood, but I am not understanding what your objections are to my attempt at a summary. I suppose I will just have to give up trying :)

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 07, 2011
at 03:58 PM

That is a great explanation, but I was curious really how different sleeping (and living) temperatures affect what is happening.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 07:03 PM

@Vrimj. did not say anything you posted. That was what you thought you heard or your perception. Sleep is coupled to metabolism but has zero to do with temperature regulation. body temp regulation is a brain only function. Melatonin decreases overall body temp and is why we need to cover ourselves when we sleep.....because we do decrease our body temp when we sleep......if you sweat like a pig when you sleep......that is a key sign of leptin resistance or hormonal dysregulation. leptin and thyroid hormones control the use of excess calories by UCP 1 and 3 proteins as I laid out.....

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 07, 2011
at 05:20 AM

This answer sounds really good, but to be honest, I have no idea what you just said. I think I translated it to be that cold air and a warm blanket is ideal?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 07, 2011
at 01:12 PM

to understand something sometimes we have to elevate our sense of awareness and many times I will try to make it easily digestible. This is one topic that i dont want you to get right away. I want you to realize that you need to go deeper to get the WHY this happens. Sleep is a big target for me. How it interacts with biology is incredibly complex. I gave you the briefest outline of it i could without any details. The details will come but I have been warned not to get into the details of things here at PH because that is not how the site is designed. So I hacked it as I was asked to.

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:48 PM

maybe im just screwed for life...

0
419ed2220b46523ccf0f4c765af85b4b

(70)

on July 18, 2011
at 10:21 AM

I have two questions one related to sleep the other related to body temp. What effect does alcohol have on sleep. I like beer but more and more I can tolerate it as it interupts my sleep. I don't sleep well and I often wake up about 2 - 3 hours after I go to bed, sweating and my heart racing. That in and of itself should tell me to lay off.

The other thing I've noticed since going paleo (7 months now), I dropped about 30 lbs. I've always been a heavy sweater, especially during exercise. But before I dropped the weight I could not be in the heat more then 5 minutes without becoming totally drenched. However, I've noticed this summer I am able to be in the heat without excessive sweating or at least any where near what it use to be. I still sweat heavily during exercise but that has always been the case even when I was young.

0
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on June 07, 2011
at 12:40 PM

I'm interested in what you meant, Quilt, also.

I, too, have been chronically cold. I'm sure I have Raynaud's syndrome (cold hands & feet) and generally, I am cool/cold, during the day. Honestly, this has a lot to do with why I now live in Africa -- it's warmer. To me, once it gets into the 50's, I'm cold. Except at night. At night I'm always hot. Blanket off, blanket on, blanket off, blanket on. Like that.

I would really like to have some understanding about what is going on and whether there is something I can do to change it. I'd much rather be warm during the day and cool at night!

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:53 PM

You need to read his blog www.jackkruse.com about leptin. He hasn't talked yet about thermoregulation but if it has to do with leptin, he will talk about it in time.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:53 PM

You need to read his blog http://www.jackkruse.com about leptin. He hasn't talked yet about thermoregulation but if it has to do with leptin, he will talk about it in time.

0
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on June 07, 2011
at 05:09 AM

My body has never been too good at thermoregulation. For many years I had a body temp in the 97s, felt chronically cold in regular temperatures, and had other hypothyroid symptoms. Now I'm much healthier due to paleo, and more muscular, but still trying to gain a few lbs so eating a good deal of food... My body temp is a degree higher than it used to be, and my whole body seems to have decided to burn most of the calories I eat off, as heat. Winter is awesome now, but the warmer months are torturous in a way I've never experienced. After I eat, my skin heats up to get rid of it (rather than doing something really out there like, you know, building muscle and fat) and I sweat like a pig and get so overheated I get ill. I have been fasting on hot days until I know I'll be in AC. I also get badly overheated when I sleep (so bad I wake up in a panic), if I eat too late.

I wonder what this looks like at the hormonal level. Do I have too much leptin? Am I just hypersensitive to what I do have?

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on June 07, 2011
at 12:58 PM

In chapter 1, Leptin, The Quilt says that many thyroid problems are actually leptin resistance problems http://www.jackkruse.com

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 08, 2011
at 09:39 PM

I've heard that theory, but I have pretty much zero symptoms of leptin resistance. I am underweight, lean, and have a history of having a small appetite and feeling ill/overfull very easily from eating.

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