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What do paleos think about the Nutritional Therapist Program?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 04, 2011 at 5:53 AM

I am sooooo fascinated by nutrition, I am considering enrolling in the Nutritional Therapist Training Program. It calls itself "A Foundational Approach to Holistic Nutrition" and declares allegiance to Weston A. Price and Francis Pottenger. I like their emphasis on healing modern degenerative disease through a nutrient-dense diet, but I am looking for a second opinion(s), and useful critique. Has anyone out there been through this program, or have another they might recommend?

5c8139d7937126906bd9133bb6e10315

on October 12, 2011
at 01:24 AM

You will certainly have fuel to fight any vegan or vegetarian and especially those raw foodies after doing this program!

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 09, 2011
at 04:04 AM

Thanks for this detailed answer! I really do feel this program could be a great jumping off place for beginning a practice, and just the encouragement I need to take myself more seriously than the 'casual commentaty' on nutrition I'm always finding myself in these days (especially with my vegan, vegetarian and raw friends)

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:21 PM

Kinesiology is not a very exact "science" in my experience. Practitioner's bias can skew the results.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 04, 2011
at 07:14 AM

I've also heard some good things about the Carleton College nutrition Ph.d program, in that there is a fair bit of room for independent study and research, where one can focus on the topics of their choice. Anyone know anything about it?

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 04, 2011
at 07:10 AM

Yes, I've heard that its frustratingly focused on supplements. I'm not sure what you mean though, "you will need to learn to do a functional examination of the body where there is very little concrete science to back up its effectiveness." So are you saying that kinesiology does, or does not achieve this?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 04, 2011
at 06:51 AM

Helpful info, thank you, I have been looking at that program too.

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5c8139d7937126906bd9133bb6e10315

on October 06, 2011
at 01:16 AM

Hi all, I just wanted to add that I attended NTA and found it a terrific foundation. I now have a pretty paleo focused nutrition practice in the Boston area. I agree that it's focused more on Weston A. Price than "Paleo" exactly. You can just remove fermented grains and there you have it, Paleo! Plus, they teach people that you need to soak your grains before consuming them, which removes a lot (not all) of the antinutrient components. Grains or no grains, that's a small issue compared to what they teach well, which is that a nutrient dense diet, full of good fats and things like bone broth and saurkraut is the way to go. There are some great qualities in raw milk cheese for example. Some Paleo/Primal folks are for it, and other against it. This program will help give you the backbone to decide whether or not you think cheese is a good thing for you (and your clients).

On top of this Gray Graham is really very smart and his new book on epigenetics is amazing! I hope he presents at the next Ancestral Health Foundation. Nobody is talking about epigenetics in these forums.

They DO NOT teach applied kinesiology. They do teach Neuro-lingual testing to determine the body's need for a particular nutrient. This style of testing is not muscle testing. You can use it as a tool or not in your practice. If someone is not into it, you don't have to use it. It's not the focus of the program, only a tool.

Regarding the supplements: Yes, they do teach you that digestive support can help people, particularly when they are adjusting from the Standard American Diet to a WAPF or Paleo diet. I usually suggest digestive support to all of my new clients. Most people have metabolic derangement and their livers and adrenal glands are not performing at an optimal level. Diet alone can not always reverse a lifetime of poor eating. They do not suggest a "one size fits all" approach to supplements. Most paleo practitioners out there work with some sort of supplementation.

I've taken what I've learned through NTA and have expanded on it through reading and conferences. I highly suggest anyone intersted in nutrition consider attending. It's short, inexpensive, conveinent, and a great backbone for starting a practice. Another Paleo/Primal pracitioner who graduated from NTA is Nora Gedgaudas, author of "Primal Body, Primal Mind", presenter at the last AHS and one of the smartest people I've met.

Please feel free to contact me directly for specific questions.

Diana Rodgers

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 09, 2011
at 04:04 AM

Thanks for this detailed answer! I really do feel this program could be a great jumping off place for beginning a practice, and just the encouragement I need to take myself more seriously than the 'casual commentaty' on nutrition I'm always finding myself in these days (especially with my vegan, vegetarian and raw friends)

5c8139d7937126906bd9133bb6e10315

on October 12, 2011
at 01:24 AM

You will certainly have fuel to fight any vegan or vegetarian and especially those raw foodies after doing this program!

5
03b67d2b8e9e878147cb3f225c864207

(766)

on October 04, 2011
at 06:41 AM

I went through it last year and am now a certified nutritional therapist. There is Paleo stuff in there, but just be aware it is more focused on WAPF so they still will talk about sprouted grains, legumes, and fermented dairy. Depending on your instructor, it will be more or less Paleo influenced. While my instructor taught about grains, he said his goal is to get all of his clients off them completely.

Another bit of warning - there is a TON of supplementation and applied keinsiology. This drove me crazy. You will need to learn how to do a functional examination of the body where there is very little concrete science to back up its effectiveness. Depending on how open you are to this sort of alternative medicine will determine how much you enjoy the class. The exam is required to graduate.

In conclusion, it was a painful process due to all the extra hippy stuff that is included beyond Paleo, but there was something very satisfying about a nutrition class that finally says that high fat diets are good for you. If you are set on learning about nutrition, this is probably your best bet, however don't expect a direct match to Paleo philosophy.

If you have any more questions, don't hesitate to ask. If you do end up signing up, tell them I referred you :-)

  • Gil Facebook.com/PrimalChef

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 04, 2011
at 07:14 AM

I've also heard some good things about the Carleton College nutrition Ph.d program, in that there is a fair bit of room for independent study and research, where one can focus on the topics of their choice. Anyone know anything about it?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 04, 2011
at 06:51 AM

Helpful info, thank you, I have been looking at that program too.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:21 PM

Kinesiology is not a very exact "science" in my experience. Practitioner's bias can skew the results.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on October 04, 2011
at 07:10 AM

Yes, I've heard that its frustratingly focused on supplements. I'm not sure what you mean though, "you will need to learn to do a functional examination of the body where there is very little concrete science to back up its effectiveness." So are you saying that kinesiology does, or does not achieve this?

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