6

votes

Paleo Guest for Thanksgiving

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 22, 2011 at 3:27 PM

We've been invited to another's house for this Thxgiving & the host is aware of my being GF, but that I can eat pretty much anything else. I don't want to be "that person" (anymore) where special things need to be cooked/prep'd/made... so I said that the "usual" fixings are fine, not to go outta the way.
Knowing the type of food these folks eat is no paleo/GF/healthy (IMO)... I'm concerned about not appearing gracious. Seeing as I'm confident all I'll be eating will be turkey & a small (cheat) helping of mashed potatoes.

I was asked to bring a side if I choose & drinks.
Now, the difficult part is in choosing a side that others would partake... other than myself that doesn't compete with what the host has already made. (bread stuffing, candied yams, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, canned cranberry sauce, pie/cookies/brownies for dessert.)

I do plan on having a very large breakfast that day (eggs, bacon, coffee w/cream & maybe fruit) to keep me satiated so I can do the "boy, we had such a big holiday breakfast, my appetite just isn't there." ;)

What recommendations/advice would you have for me?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 23, 2011
at 11:59 PM

I go back - go back - go back - go back! :-))

F3583667d653163c121640a015ffa93a

(784)

on November 23, 2011
at 01:19 AM

Brussels sprouts, bacon, and onions!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 22, 2011
at 11:08 PM

Roasted with bacon is my preferred way of doing Brussels sprouts on Thanksgiving. I recommend this.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 22, 2011
at 09:21 PM

I'm going to try this - just had some horrible steamed bitter brussels sprouts tonight...

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on November 22, 2011
at 08:41 PM

This is also a fabulous way to cook broccoli. Yum!

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on November 22, 2011
at 03:57 PM

I think in some locations olives are considered traditional Thanksgiving food.

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16 Answers

best answer

1
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on November 22, 2011
at 03:48 PM

I'm not GF, so I'd eat traditional sides if they were home-cooked, but my family member is going the instant potatoes, canned yams, and Stove Top route. So I'm bringing carrots & broccoli to steam right before dinner.

best answer

1
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on November 22, 2011
at 04:04 PM

I understand your not wanting to appear ungracious, but as a frequent hostess I have a different take on this. I like to make sure my guests have something they can fill up on that makes them feel welcome and happy. Some hostesses feel put out about making special dishes, but a really good hostess wants to make her guests feel comfortable and would prefer having to modify a dish or two or supply a special dish than to see you only eat turkey and feel like she's deprived you. In a way it's less gracious to not speak up and ask for at least one special dish than to just eat the turkey (unless just eating the turkey is your normal diet of course!!!). I definitely would not have a hostess modify the gravy for me, but asking for a plain side vegetable wouldn't be too much.

Giving you an option to bring a side dish is also a way to make you feel welcome and to have something that you can for sure eat (it takes the pressure off of your host or hostess and taking advantage of this offer will help make you appear gracious). Take advantage of this! Steamed or grilled asparagus is simple and bright and pleasing at a holiday meal. A stuffed squash dish with apples and sausage might also be "festive" and would give you a lot to fill up on. If there are kids at the meal, a kid-friendly Paleo apple salad, baked apples, fried apples or home-made applesauce would be welcomed. This would also give you an option at dessert (as in "I'll just have a little more applesauce, thank you"). I'm sure a lot of people will give you good side dish ideas. Go ahead and bring one or two.

If you're interested, I've posted a recipe for baked apples on my low oxalate blog, plus you'll find a recipe for fried apples on the side bar http://lowoxalatefamily.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/holiday-baked-apples/

best answer

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 22, 2011
at 04:12 PM

This is easy. Even when I was eating SAD, I was always asked to bring my fruit salad which is just fine for ancestral eating on a holiday. I've also frequently taken raw veggies. Both are very popular as counter-points to the sweet stuff and many people are trying to eat healthy as they define it, with fruit and veggies universally welcome.

This year I'm going to a gathering and I'm taking the fruit salad by request of the group.

At home, I'm making a goose with baked sweet potatoes, etc.

3
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on November 22, 2011
at 08:29 PM

My non-paleo family loves brussels sprouts sauteed in bacon fat (or with pancetta and sauteed in the renrdered fat) and tossed with a little bit of balsamic vinegar. It converts non-brussels sprout eaters frequently.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 22, 2011
at 09:21 PM

I'm going to try this - just had some horrible steamed bitter brussels sprouts tonight...

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on November 22, 2011
at 08:41 PM

This is also a fabulous way to cook broccoli. Yum!

3
6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on November 22, 2011
at 04:09 PM

In My experience, there is always plenty of turkey, salad and veggies to keep me happy on Thanksgiving. Fill your plate with this stuff and I doubt anyone will notice or care.

2
Af005ec9a8e028f2b04bf5367b64e0d6

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

brussel sprouts

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 22, 2011
at 11:08 PM

Roasted with bacon is my preferred way of doing Brussels sprouts on Thanksgiving. I recommend this.

F3583667d653163c121640a015ffa93a

(784)

on November 23, 2011
at 01:19 AM

Brussels sprouts, bacon, and onions!

2
1ec4e7ca085b7f8d5821529653e1e35a

(5506)

on November 22, 2011
at 05:48 PM

whole9 has a recent post on a paleo thanksgiving. everything looks awesome and there are tons of recipes on it.

http://whole9life.com/2011/11/thanksgiving-2011/

I'm going to make the cranberries.

2
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 22, 2011
at 03:44 PM

How about another veggie like asparagus? Sauteed mushrooms always go over well in my home too.

1
74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on November 22, 2011
at 10:13 PM

My friend is incredibly kind and wonderful and has graciously extended her family's celebration to myself and my partner. She and her family knows about my delicate stomach, but I imagine that most foods at the table will probably be things that I find that I can eat anyway, including mashers, turkey or ham, and vegetables. (I have not been so bold as to inquire what the feast entails, but I'm confident that I'll maneuver it seamlessly.)

I plan on enjoying those items thoroughly and have no intention of calling attention to the things that I am not eating, as I feel that would be rude and unnecessary. I will lavish praise upon the yummy things that I do eat, though, and thank them exuberantly for inviting me. In other words, I plan on focusing on the pleasant aspects of this get-together, and make my own dietary sensitivities a non-issue unless somebody asks.

I also plan on bringing some sort of dessert, such as my grainless choccy chippers or a flourless pumpkin spice cake. I love baking, so this will be fun for me.

I'm looking forward to spending time with my friend and her family. While I know the food will be delicious, the day is not about what I am or am not eating, but fellowship with the lovely people whom I adore. :)

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 22, 2011
at 09:46 PM

Do you really have a need to be GF? Seriously, like doubled over in pain or anaphylaxis? Or are you gluten free because you do the "I don't want to eat wheat because I'm paleo" thing?

If the former, take care of yourself, don't worry about appearing gracious, explain the situation if social faux pas seem imminent. If the latter, suck it up, eat some food and try to appear halfway "normal".

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 22, 2011
at 03:33 PM

Bring two sides! That should give you enough variety when you add in the turkey. Gravey will likely be out unless they make it GF for you.

0
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 24, 2011
at 03:19 AM

I know it is late, but I plan on taking the broccoli and cauliflower casserole from this post to my mom's tomorrow. Bacon would be a welcome addition, I'm sure: http://everydaypaleo.com/2010/11/15/thanksgiving-recipes-and-everyday-paleo-pumpkin-pie-cooking-demo/

0
164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on November 23, 2011
at 11:39 PM

Hello & thanks to everyone who posted food ideas/recipes & gave their own experiences. It's MUCH appreciated. I don't think many people go back & read posts after they've posted - so if you are reading this, thanks; but I won't be responding to the questions/concerns some people have posted individually.
My Sincere Thanks.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 23, 2011
at 11:59 PM

I go back - go back - go back - go back! :-))

0
Dd1f2bbed93f5502fc44663a0f6b0c79

on November 22, 2011
at 06:09 PM

An "unusual" dish that I prepare for events like this is Bok Choy. Fry (low heat) some onions, garlic (lots) and ginger (lots) and then throw in some BABY Bok Choy. Can add basil (pinch), red peppers also (sweetens the dish) and add baby spinach (more volume). People try it and then go crazy for it. Look at the nutritional value http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/bok-choy.html Make it at THEIR house. Needs to be cooked just before eating. I converted a few people to Paleo just by this as people dont know the flavors of healthy food. Have fun...

0
F4b9ff9c2f7e7670253a22851b6542cf

on November 22, 2011
at 04:49 PM

Go here: http://www.genaw.com/lowcarb/

Make a couple of side dishes and then relax and be thankful for the bounty.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 22, 2011
at 04:03 PM

Bring sweet potato. You can mash it up, add some cinnamon and a bit of coconut oil to it.

Or how about a butternut squash soup as a starter?

Or some lomi-lomi salmon as a source of omega 3's to offset the omega 6's from the turkey? (just be sure it's wildcaught.)

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