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My testosterone, progesterone, and vit D are low. Im 44 yr old female. Help?

Answered on February 15, 2014
Created February 13, 2014 at 2:42 AM

My testosterone, progesterone, and vit D are low. Im 44 yr old female. Help?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on February 15, 2014
at 05:47 AM

Good call, I'm looking forward to getting off the night shift for some UVB this summer to generate my own D3. I've seen other articles with 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L) as optimal, which is even higher than PHD lists (which is higher than the recommendations in the study of 5,000iu for 3mo to reach 63.8 nmol/L.) In a Toronto study, I see 75 nmol/L+ as "optimal" and 75-50 nmol/L listed "insufficient."

Away from UVB, 2,000-5,000iu is an adequate dose if you're not deficient or on a herring diet. Prior to a 50 ng/ml level, d3 is used as fast as its provided without storage.

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on February 15, 2014
at 03:57 AM

so, here is a fairly recent comment from Paul on this,

"D to serum 25OHD of 40 ng/ml ??? this will depend on location and lifestyle, but for a northerner it might typically be 4000 IU/day in winter, 2500 IU/day spring and fall, 0 to 1000 IU/day summer.

K2 ??? 100 mcg/day of MK-7 form. Magnesium ??? 200 mg/day. Boron ??? 3 mg/wk up to 3 mg/day. Silicon ??? eat seaweed and you wouldn???t need this" #2

141c6b3d5e9506dd93881e3f9737f297

(55)

on February 15, 2014
at 03:55 AM

just to be clear, for Vit D PHD recommeneds you "Seek total dose from sun, food, and supplements of 4,000 IU/day" once you meet their suggested 25OHD level #1.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on February 15, 2014
at 02:32 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22422304 would suggest 5,000iu/d a good starting point for correcting a deficiency. (Note in that study, their 'optimal' target 25OHD, even with 5,000iu/d supplementation, is still 40% less than PHD's target 25OHD level.) That's 10oz of herring every single day. While do able, it's generally thought that it's nearly impossible to modulate 25OHD through diet.

10,000iu/d is a safe dosage.

A 50,000iu dose is a safe dose.

PHD recommends supplements of 4000iu/d. You're not going to develop vitamin D toxicity there.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on February 14, 2014
at 02:31 PM

It is also easy to overconsume vitamins when taking supplements, and too much vitamin D can cause hypervitaminosis D: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervitaminosis_D. By the way, I'm not sure if the Vitamin D council is an unbiased reference on the subject. They might have financial interests in promoting supplementation of Vitamin D.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on February 14, 2014
at 02:31 PM

You would not need to eat a lot of herring daily at all. One fillet of herring alone has 749% daily requirement of Vitamin D (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4065/2). You could eat one per day and easily correct a vitamin D deficiency, without overdoing it. Want to really go big on Vitamin D? Fine, just eat it every day or every two days for several months, you'll get plenty of it. Besides, it is better to prescribe people real Paleo food (wild-caught herring) than industrial supplements.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on February 14, 2014
at 09:02 AM

I'm not sure how well fish and diet can actually influence vitamin D levels, especially in the face of a deficiency in the winter months away from UVB rays. That's one that's easiest to correct through supplements and blood testing. You would need to eat a lot of herring daily.

I take 4000iu d3 daily. With a deficiency, I could see 5000iu/d as a starting point (the dosage would be best determined with the help of the doc running the tests.) Herring comes in around 1500iu a serving.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/

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2 Answers

0
6fece842bd1bcf5724f458a302a2156e

on February 15, 2014
at 08:33 AM

I was reading an article in the UK about this a few days ago. In fact a UK lady flies to the US every year to be treated by a leading US lady doctor who helps women increase their levels although not naturally. One item mentioned was if you are over weight losing 20% of the weight, getting leaner, closer to a low but healthy BMI increases testosterone in women (by the way women do need some - it's important for feeling good, sex drive and all kinds of things) so try that first - get down to a BMI of say 19. I certainly feel sexier at under 126 pounds that when 140 pounds (my current weight). For me that 126 pounds level is the cut off - I suspect at that weight I then get more.fat (although I'm not obese or even overweight) which increases levels of some other hormone - I never remember their names.

Secondly it suggested exercise increases it and that would seem to make sense too.

I agree about sunlight - that is by far the best way to get extra vit D. In the summer after lunch (I work at home most days) I go and lie in my garden with just about nothing on for 20 minutes without sunscreen. It is not possible for half the year in the Uk though as the sun is not hot enough. I eat salmon once a week and often sardines but I really don't think food gets you Vit D in the same way sunshine on bare skin without sunscreen does.

I suppose if you get weight down to a 19 BMI, exercise a lot and lie around outside in the sun almost naked that probably in itself makes you feel sexier - so it's win win all round. I will just have to put it into practice myself now!

Actually I've never had my levels tested but I've often thought one reason I'm happy and am quite successful as a lawyer and work hard and love life (and sex) is because I probably have higher levels of testosterone than most women and that I am very lucky that that is so. like beating others, winning, am ambitious, like money and power and success. It's huge fun.

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on February 13, 2014
at 10:50 PM

It is normal for progesterone to be low in postmenopausal women (I assume this is your case given that you are 44) see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progesterone#Levels. Furthermore, low testosterone is not a bad thing if you're a woman, this is primarily a concern for men, but even then it is also a perfectly normal effect of aging (trying to raise it through medication may have unwanted adverse effects including stroke, heart attack, certain cancers, etc). And finally your vitamin D deficiency can be easily corrected by getting sunlight and eating more fish like salmon, herring, sardines, etc.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on February 14, 2014
at 09:02 AM

I'm not sure how well fish and diet can actually influence vitamin D levels, especially in the face of a deficiency in the winter months away from UVB rays. That's one that's easiest to correct through supplements and blood testing. You would need to eat a lot of herring daily.

I take 4000iu d3 daily. With a deficiency, I could see 5000iu/d as a starting point (the dosage would be best determined with the help of the doc running the tests.) Herring comes in around 1500iu a serving.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/

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