0

votes

Safe temp. egg yolks?

Commented on November 26, 2013
Created November 24, 2013 at 3:01 PM

What's a safe temperature for egg yolks? I keep seeing 165 degrees for eggs, but I'm only using the yolks.

I added boiling water to 1/2 of oats, waited 4 minutes. It was at 147 degrees.

I then added 3 egg yolks, and the temp reduced to 136 degrees. I left covered for a few more minutes.

Is that hot enough to kill anything bad?

I know some folks here eat raw yolks but I'm too scared to do that.

Specifically, I'm curious about yolks that were swimming in potentially contaminated whites. Even though I separate them, I'm sure the yolks would be cross contaminated if the white were contaminated.

I have read here that salmonella is mainly on the outer shell, but I don't wash the eggs which hot soapy water before cracking them.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Mike

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on November 26, 2013
at 06:18 PM

Holy mackerel, that's an awesome answer! Do you think it's common when you buy pastured eggs that the eggs are washed an sanitized like in big factory farm operations?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on November 25, 2013
at 01:39 AM

super cool reply, thank you! love the chart!

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

best answer

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 24, 2013
at 04:28 PM

Look at data on pasturization:

http://static2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100316014153/sousvide/images/4/40/Pasteurization-times.jpg

You're starting your egg cooking at 64C and it cools to 58C. At 58C, you're looking at 10-15 minutes to pasteurize it. Largely overkill though, but those are the numbers you're interested in.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on November 25, 2013
at 01:39 AM

super cool reply, thank you! love the chart!

0
9b31524c2da457538b934eb1aff955d8

on November 26, 2013
at 12:26 PM

In a egg, the shell and shell membranes prevent bacteria from entering the egg. The last layer of white is composed of thick ropey strands, called chalazae, which holds the yolk centered in the egg where it receives the maximum protection from bacteria by all the other layers.

Bacteria can be both on the outside and inside of a shell egg. Eggs can become infected by fecal contamination when the egg exits the hen's body or by dirt or dust in the environment that's why eggs are washed and sanitized at the processing plant. Its been said that Salmonella Enteritidis has the ability to grow both in the egg yolk and white.

Most bacteria is usually in the yolk. The yolk contains nutrients bacteria need to grow. Bacteria have also been found to grow in the white, however not as often as in the yolk. It is advise not to eat raw or undercooked egg yolks and whites or products containing raw or undercooked eggs.

[edit by Matt11: spam link removed]

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on November 26, 2013
at 06:18 PM

Holy mackerel, that's an awesome answer! Do you think it's common when you buy pastured eggs that the eggs are washed an sanitized like in big factory farm operations?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!