4

votes

Telomerase Activators

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 15, 2011 at 9:58 PM

I don't know where the paleohacks community stands on telomeres as a marker of longetivity. However, I have come across two "telomerase activators" and was wondering what you all think. One of them is called TA-65, which apparently activates a gene that turns on the telomerase enzyme (http://www.tasciences.com/ta-65/). The other is Product B which includes a proprietary blend of herbs such as milk thistle, horny goat weed, turmeric, etc. (http://www.isagenix.com/us/en/product_b.html). A company called sierra sciences is also in the process of creating drugs that seem to claim big things about increasing telomere length. http://www.sierrasci.com/index.html

The 2 supplements are not cheap by any means. However, I am intrigued by the idea of anti-aging. Does anyone here have experience with either of these products, and what do you think? Putting money aside, are these products put in the category of there is nothing to lose? Or is there any sort of concern that increasing telomere length can potentially increase the likelihood of cancer or other diseases.

I am more interested in product b as I have heard of many of the ingredients before but would appreciate any thoughts on the topic, thanks.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Interesting, how loss of cellular integrity correlates with so many "age related diseases," and then, given a certain shift in cellular terroir fosters rapid cellular proliferation, i.e., cancer. Not suggesting anything paradoxical, by the sway. Cellular dynamics, age-related; fascinating stuff. Much to learn.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 16, 2011
at 02:45 PM

Senescence is the immediate outcome of a short telomere not oncogenesis. Oncogenesis or apoptosis is the next choice that the mitochondria makes. It appears the surrounding cellular terroir is what decides what happens.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:58 AM

Cancer more likely is the *outcome* of telomere shortening, though not necessarily cause-effect.

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on November 16, 2011
at 01:35 AM

I thought this linked to an article, not to someone trying to sell me something.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 15, 2011
at 10:54 PM

I'll consider such a thing when humans first create a headache medicine that doesn't kill people every year.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 15, 2011
at 10:08 PM

For now I'm maintaining a healthy skepticism that it could be so simple. If true, there'd probably be a Nobel prize in the offing.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 15, 2011
at 10:00 PM

I love telomeres almost as much as I love leptin, mitochondria, and glut-4 :)

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5 Answers

6
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 16, 2011
at 04:37 AM

I love the idea of telomerase inhibitors but none of these are optimal. I like high dose Vitamin D and L-carnosine to lengthen my own telomeres the old fashion way. Sun and meat are my telomeres favorite supplements

3
2b2c2e4aa87e9aa4c99cae48e980f70d

(1059)

on November 16, 2011
at 03:36 AM

Paging Dr. K. Stat!

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 16, 2011
at 12:37 AM

Vitamin D may have some impact: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21986705

1
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:04 PM

Don't telomeres shorten over time for a reason, like to prevent cancer? In any case, even if not there's like to be lots of other tweaks that will be needed to extend lifespan. One that comes to mind is periodic retraining of your immune system, as your DNA and proteins gradually change over time leading to autoimmunity issues. I suspect most will be preventative - reducing rate of damage over time so wouldn't help us much but maybe our children.

You might find this interesting: The Easiest Way to Reverse Your Aging Clock

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:58 AM

Cancer more likely is the *outcome* of telomere shortening, though not necessarily cause-effect.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Interesting, how loss of cellular integrity correlates with so many "age related diseases," and then, given a certain shift in cellular terroir fosters rapid cellular proliferation, i.e., cancer. Not suggesting anything paradoxical, by the sway. Cellular dynamics, age-related; fascinating stuff. Much to learn.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 16, 2011
at 02:45 PM

Senescence is the immediate outcome of a short telomere not oncogenesis. Oncogenesis or apoptosis is the next choice that the mitochondria makes. It appears the surrounding cellular terroir is what decides what happens.

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on November 16, 2011
at 01:35 AM

I thought this linked to an article, not to someone trying to sell me something.

0
3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

on June 09, 2012
at 01:57 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15474517

l-carnosine is worth a shot

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