1

votes

What to do with cavities?

Answered on June 04, 2015
Created May 08, 2011 at 5:33 PM

My dentist found two cavities during my long hiatus from the dreaded dental office. To my knowledge, this is the first time I've had cavities. His recommendation was to either fill them in with Amalgams ($45 per) or Post. Composite ($67 per). I'm most certain I won't opt for the silver/mercury containing Amalgams. My student insurance policy will be ending this summer and I need to decide whether I will fill them in with Post. Composites.

What would you do? I'm considering doing the oil pulling method and supplementing with cod liver oil and high-vitamin butter, but am on a budget.

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on May 09, 2011
at 04:11 PM

No tips, unfortunately, I don't live in the states and don't know much about how things work there. While I would take comfort in the fact that you're not experiencing any pain, I would also not want to wait until I feel pain.. So I'm just no help at all. Sorry!

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on May 09, 2011
at 05:43 AM

no pain. Any tips on finding an affordable way of getting a second opinion?

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4 Answers

best answer

1
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on May 08, 2011
at 06:35 PM

As far as I know, once you get the cavities you kind of need to have them filled. The oil pulling etc may help you prevent additional cavities though. I'm 40 years old so I have some of the old silver fillings but in recent years since they've gone to the digital xrays that pick up very tiny cavities (mostly in between teeth) I've had the composite fillers put in. I've had to have some of my old fillings replaced as well and they've used the composite. I haven't had any problems with these fillings.

I'm sure some people here will say there's no need to fill these teeth but I don't know enough about dentistry to argue with the experts. I've got periodontal disease so I'm scared I'll lose my teeth if I don't "follow the rules".

best answer

1
3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on May 08, 2011
at 06:41 PM

I'm also not one who knows that much about dentistry, but I would recommend getting a second opinion, if you can. Dentist's declarations on the number of cavities a person has can vary widely. We've stopped our children's cavities from developing more by using fermented CLO and butter oil. Since we've stopped (also on a budget) the teeth look a bit worse. Are you experiencing pain?

Good luck!

3558d8feb56bc681144f87e67140f885

on May 09, 2011
at 04:11 PM

No tips, unfortunately, I don't live in the states and don't know much about how things work there. While I would take comfort in the fact that you're not experiencing any pain, I would also not want to wait until I feel pain.. So I'm just no help at all. Sorry!

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on May 09, 2011
at 05:43 AM

no pain. Any tips on finding an affordable way of getting a second opinion?

0
Medium avatar

on June 04, 2015
at 07:25 PM

I am a dentist and am really into naturally remineralizing cavities. Choosing to try the remineralization route may or may not be a good idea - there are many factors to take into consideration. Location and size of cavity makes a huge difference in the likeliness to remineralize (aka 'heal'). For example a small cavity on the tongue-side or cheek-side surface of a tooth is a great candidate to try to remineralize. A large cavity in-between the teeth is not a good candidate and should be filled. Obviously no cavity (even the tiny ones in easy locations) will remineralize if the necessary conditions to do so are not met, but even when the necessary conditions are met, some cavities are much more likely to remineralize ('heal') than others.

0
355ae559fc7c4038c63b5897d74e8a40

on May 16, 2013
at 03:53 PM

Personally I'd rather have the amalgam fillings in my own teeth. They tend to be longer lasting than other materials and I'd rather have as little filling work going on in my mouth as possible. I'm unconvinced by the claims that they are deleterious to health. That said, I realise that others are persuaded by the claims which is fair enough, and it may be that some people are more sensitive to the materials used in metal fillings than others. The issue here is do you need the fillings at all, and that's a decision only you can make ultimately, even with a second or third or whole sheaves of dentists' opinions. I lost a couple of elderly fillings nearly ten years ago and have not had them replaced. I keep the cavities clean and eat no sugar and very little starch and I know the cavities are not getting any bigger. If you are doing the same then you might be ok without filling work. If you have active decay though, then you might be better off allowing some intervention. Your decision.

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