6

votes

Hack my sensitive teeth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 09, 2011 at 8:17 PM

A couple days ago, my lower right teeth have started hurting. I think it may be the gums. Either way, it hurts to chew on that side. I don't think it's a cavity; just sensitivity. I've never experienced this before. My meals are very meat-heavy so it's not anything acidic contributing to it. Should I just wait for the pain to go away? Is there something that will make the healing go faster? The left side doesn't hurt, so I could concentrate chewing on that side; but it's just annoying chewing on one side. Also, what are some suggestions for "soft" foods that I can eat?

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 03, 2014
at 11:04 AM

Several people here have written about their good experiences about Sensodyne, so that is what I am going to try...

Baking soda: isn't that abrasive?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 03, 2014
at 03:46 AM

Silliness. Where's the proof that toothpaste is problematic?

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 02, 2014
at 01:14 PM

No probs, Matt. We will not fight about this question :-)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2014
at 01:10 PM

Fat fingers on a smartphone ended up deleting a comment by Andrea. No way to undo. Grrrrrr

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 02, 2014
at 01:06 PM

Cool, same here. Everyone can educate themselves about refined table salt as well.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2014
at 12:57 PM

I don't expect to convince you of anything. You already made up your mind. Hope others can read or exchange and decide for themselves.

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 02, 2014
at 12:46 PM

Well okay, I still prefer Himalayan salt to refined salt - as per my Doc's recommendation, who is in no way a snakeoil salesman.

And for me, a small amount of the good stuff is anyway better than no amount, so I don't mind the price - a bag of pink salt which lasts for about 3 months, for all my kitchen and beauty needs, costs 2 bucks here in Europe.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 02, 2014
at 11:54 AM

Yes, for those amounts the salt is completely pointless.

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 01, 2014
at 12:46 PM

So do you prefer "normal", refined salt instead?

And maybe we should stay on topic, which is teeth sensitivity. I shared my experience about rinsing one's mouth with salt water - do you have something to add to that?

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 01, 2014
at 12:37 PM

Thanks for the link. I am not sure if I am getting what you are saying: is it that if Himalayan salt contains so small amount of these minerals, it is pointless to use it instead of other salts that don't even have this much minerals?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 01, 2014
at 11:27 AM

The problem is when you search for himalayan salt you get a bunch of snakeoil salesmen at the top.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 01, 2014
at 11:27 AM

But hey, a cursory Google search and some basic math for ya: If you consumed 10 grams of this salt a day, you'd be consuming: 4 mg Li, 1.6 mg Mg, 35 mg K, 40 mg Ca… the most plentiful transition metal (iron)… 10 grams of salt has less than 400 micrograms. (http://www.atthemeadow.com/shop/resources/minerals-in-pink-himalayan-salt)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 01, 2014
at 11:25 AM

Shouldn't you know if you're consuming what you think you are?

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 01, 2014
at 04:59 AM

Would you please back this up with references? Thanks.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 28, 2014
at 05:39 PM

Clenching will also do it. Unfortunately, a night guard doesn't help much there, except to spread the load around. Anyone who suffers from nocturnal bruxism should get a sleep study, since that's a common (and commonly missed) cause.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 28, 2014
at 01:37 PM

Himalayan pink salt is salt, the mineral content is pure hype.

3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on December 30, 2011
at 10:13 AM

Chemical sensitive like in you have cut out so many mystery ingredients from your food and maybe a few other hygiene products that when you are exposed to them in a lotion or toothpaste or cookie ect that you react to them since they are not natural. Your body gets used to not being bombarded with all the chemicals - I am not meaning water and air, I am talking about 'unnatural' chemicals - things that Grok would not have been exposed too

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on December 19, 2011
at 01:16 PM

"Chemical" sensitive? You mean chemicals, like water, air, food?

Medium avatar

(10663)

on December 19, 2011
at 05:59 AM

Yeah it's random for me too! Maybe a week will go by without it hurting and then it'll hurt for a few days and I can only chew on my left side. It's annoying.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 24, 2011
at 08:50 AM

I have the same problem. If I eat hard meats for a few days straight I get sensitivity in my gums. I healed that by moving to minced meat and other softer meats. I'm wondering how long it does take to get used to it, and if it can be expedited with certain foods or supplementation.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 24, 2011
at 08:48 AM

That thread is about teeth sensitivity, not gum sensitivity from chewing.

18d89478c2fbd0a69889ae094f5fa5d3

(418)

on November 21, 2011
at 02:25 AM

Soft Foods - Eggs come to mind, maybe fish or chicken.

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (10663)
  • Views
    4.5K
  • Last Activity
    1284D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

11 Answers

1
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on December 19, 2011
at 11:52 AM

It's possible that you grind your teeth at night. Grinding puts abnormal pressures on your teeth, jaw and gums and can be the culprit behind tooth sensitivity, headaches and facial pain.

If you don't wear a night guard, pick up an OTC boil and bite guard (one made by Dentek will give you the most bang for your buck) and wear it at night. It's a bit awkward trying to sleep with something in your mouth, but it will save your teeth! Just don't get the kind which have flimsy bite wings--they tend to fall out of your mouth at night. Look for the full coverage mouth guard.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 28, 2014
at 05:39 PM

Clenching will also do it. Unfortunately, a night guard doesn't help much there, except to spread the load around. Anyone who suffers from nocturnal bruxism should get a sleep study, since that's a common (and commonly missed) cause.

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on November 10, 2011
at 02:25 AM

I gargle a couple of times a week with 3% Hydrogen Peroxide. It seems to help with transient sensitivity (like if I get some meat caught in betwwen my teeth & forget to floss right away...)

0
7a777966a2b7f30251c358b6fe35936f

on June 02, 2014
at 10:51 AM

The Paleo way of treating the sensitive teeth is stop using commercial toothpaste. Even Sensodyne, the brand usually used for sensitive individuals, could be the cause of the problem rather than the cure. Start using Natural toothpaste recipes. Mixing a little baking soda with some coconut oil. You can put in a few drops of peppermint oil in your paste for good taste.

Medium avatar

(0)

on June 03, 2014
at 11:04 AM

Several people here have written about their good experiences about Sensodyne, so that is what I am going to try...

Baking soda: isn't that abrasive?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 03, 2014
at 03:46 AM

Silliness. Where's the proof that toothpaste is problematic?

0
Medium avatar

on May 29, 2014
at 09:48 AM

There was a post by Denise Minger on Mark's Daily Apple yesterday that looked in-depth at teeth. Apparently Denise had really bad toothache and quite crooked teeth at one point, and she talks about how she went about fixing them. Anyway, she mentioned getting a lot of vitamins A, D and K2, whilst avoiding acidic fermented foods. So I'd check that out anyway.

0
De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 28, 2014
at 05:44 PM

Other than bruxism, you might also want to rule out nocturnal reflux. Don't eat food less than 4-5 hours before going to sleep. Liquids are ok up to 30-60 min before bed. Raise the head of your bed 6-8" can also help. This should be enough for age-related reflux, which is the most common.

The next most common cause would be a sleep breathing disorder. Theory goes that if your airway becomes congested while sleeping, your throat acts like a straw between your stomach and your mouth. Your lungs create a vacuum in your throat and if it isn't filled by air then it will be filled by stomach contents instead. Acid and bruxism tend to go together and both contribute to tooth sensitivity.

0
Medium avatar

on May 28, 2014
at 11:24 AM

Rinsing your mouth with salt water might do wonders.

I have found Himalayan pink salt to be the best. Whether my teeth feel sensitive because of the fruits or something that I have just eaten, or there is some cavity tooth ache (which I only had for a few days for the past, I don't know, 10 years or so), rinsing my mouth with a pinch of salt dissolved in a little water for a few minutes always helps, pain is gone.

And Himalayan salt has lots of minerals that are supposed to be absorbed and therefore strengthen the teeth (which I am hoping for, big time), but I have not used it long enough yet to give you personal experiences.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 28, 2014
at 01:37 PM

Himalayan pink salt is salt, the mineral content is pure hype.

0
6fd2e593b17833f8a5888338858579dd

on March 28, 2012
at 04:44 AM

Ya right now I have very sensitive teeth and I thinks it's the tooth enamel. I don't know a very good answer but you could try sensidine toothpaste or whatever. Ecause that what I am gonna try!

0
3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:47 AM

What are you using for toothpaste? I have and have heard this alot from others too that after going Paleo and cutting out so many chemicals that you start to become chemical sensitive.

I stopped using toothpaste because I had the same issue, majorly sore mouth/teeth. I just use a plain bar of soap (glycerin free) I have no sensitivity issues anymore. I wrote about my progress with it here if you are interested. and let me know if you have questions, I know it sounds crazy... but it is one of the best things I have done!

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on December 19, 2011
at 01:16 PM

"Chemical" sensitive? You mean chemicals, like water, air, food?

3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on December 30, 2011
at 10:13 AM

Chemical sensitive like in you have cut out so many mystery ingredients from your food and maybe a few other hygiene products that when you are exposed to them in a lotion or toothpaste or cookie ect that you react to them since they are not natural. Your body gets used to not being bombarded with all the chemicals - I am not meaning water and air, I am talking about 'unnatural' chemicals - things that Grok would not have been exposed too

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on December 19, 2011
at 05:02 AM

oh dear, i hope you dint crack a tooth. that is exactly what happend to me. and i had the same symptoms. See a dentist. he can shine a light through the tooth. if you are lucky he can save the tooth with a crown. if you are un-lucky you might need a root canal with the crown. please google the danger of root canal and decide if its better just to remove the cracked tooth. good luck. i hope its not cracked.

0
082bf04a7486991c5e573a66f1404b3e

on December 08, 2011
at 03:43 PM

I had a case of this between two of my upper teeth on the left side a few weeks back! Very annoying, and I could think of no obvious reason either.

In my case, it just "switched on" at seemingly random intervals; it couldn't be food since sometimes it would hurt first thing in the morning when it didnt hurt the night before.

The best advise I can give you is floss the heck out of the area. If it's anything like mine, it probably has very little to do with your diet, just whats getting stuck :)

Medium avatar

(10663)

on December 19, 2011
at 05:59 AM

Yeah it's random for me too! Maybe a week will go by without it hurting and then it'll hurt for a few days and I can only chew on my left side. It's annoying.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 10, 2011
at 02:29 AM

Also see this thread from yesterday. Very similar question so the answers may be relevant.

This could be as simple as food caught between your teeth to a gum infection and many things in between--in your case, hope it clears up quickly!

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 24, 2011
at 08:48 AM

That thread is about teeth sensitivity, not gum sensitivity from chewing.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!