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Tea: does the body adapts to expect it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 28, 2011 at 4:46 PM

I know this is going to sound ridiculous but bear it with me.

Let's say you want to drink tea in the afternoon. If you do it consistently and you don't drink tea all of a suddenly, would the body crave for some meal or food at that time?

Or would you say "come on Jonas, if tea did that, then we wouldn't be able to drink water or else the body would be expecting a meal everytime you didn't drink water."

Does it make any difference in the equation if the tea has actual calories?

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:47 PM

There may still be caffeine-withdrawal reaction, or a habituation reaction, but the tea itself won't cause cravings.

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on November 29, 2011
at 02:52 AM

So you shouldn't have physical withdrawals, your body just expects tea at a certain time because you've programmed that response through repetition...Shouldn't be a big deal to let it go if that's what you're choosing.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:02 PM

I usually have tea without calories and non-caffeinated? That means there won't be any addicion/whitdrawal issue?

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:57 PM

So if doesn't have calories there's no problem?

559a1bf85bfe38a0fbbf56377c7278b4

(1548)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:22 PM

This is very good advice, which ties in with my experience of giving up smoking

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5 Answers

4
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:10 PM

My experience is that tea is just tea. However, if you're adding sugar/honey/etc. to the tea, it will stimulate an insulin response. In addition, if the tea is caffeinated tea, even though it is a significantly lower amount of caffeine than coffee, there may still be a physical withdrawal from the caffeine in sensitive individuals.

On the other hand, the process of habituation -- making a habit of having -something- at a certain time every day -- can trigger a cascade of emotional brain chemicals when you try to change the -pattern-. These are the same chemicals that are triggered any time that we try to break a habit, and they're one reason that the best way to replace a BAD habit is not to quit and leave nothing in that space, but to replace the bad habit with a GOOD habit that we then reinforce by repeating the good NEW habit each time we have the desire to act on the old, bad habit. .

It may be that this is habituation, rather than a physical response to the tea.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:57 PM

So if doesn't have calories there's no problem?

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:47 PM

There may still be caffeine-withdrawal reaction, or a habituation reaction, but the tea itself won't cause cravings.

559a1bf85bfe38a0fbbf56377c7278b4

(1548)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:22 PM

This is very good advice, which ties in with my experience of giving up smoking

2
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on November 28, 2011
at 07:13 PM

Is your tea herbal or caffeinated? Caffeine will cause a physical addiction, and ritually consuming anything will form a habit, which can cause endorphins to be released, and not released if you suddenly abstain....I personally drink tea habitually daily, and notice unpleasantness not only related to caffeine withdrawal when I abstain. I usually do a couple periods a year without it to reset, but always go back...it's really my only vice anymore, so I've made my peace with my tea addiction.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:02 PM

I usually have tea without calories and non-caffeinated? That means there won't be any addicion/whitdrawal issue?

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on November 29, 2011
at 02:52 AM

So you shouldn't have physical withdrawals, your body just expects tea at a certain time because you've programmed that response through repetition...Shouldn't be a big deal to let it go if that's what you're choosing.

1
D4621186e06f57de43e67c3a64bcda0b

on November 28, 2011
at 06:20 PM

I believe this is called a "habit". It is likely your mind realizing you haven't had tea yet, and telling you that you need tea because you always have tea. Our minds are our own worst enemies (if you consider tea being a bad habit, anyways).

0
244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:19 PM

I don't think that would happen unless there were things in there that you were sensitive to (you can become addicted to offending foods that cause mild food allergies) or if it was caffeinated. I don't think the body sets a clock and says "tea time!" If you were adding something with calories to the tea that usually energize you for the afternoon, and then you skip it one day, and find you do not have the energy, I would consider that to be more cause-and-effect and not the body retaliating because it was "expecting" to have tea.

If you do start craving it, it may be psychological. I personally don't think that the body would expect tea. Over the last 2.2 million years of our evolution, we didn't have "tea rivers" to drink from, so for the most part, I think that the body expects to have water. The hormones of the human body regulate cravings based on needs of survival (say if you need calories for energy/basic functions, or if your body fat stores become too high or too low). So there shouldn't be any cravings if those things are in check, and you're not addicted to an offending food.

0
A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on November 28, 2011
at 05:09 PM

I don't really understand. I think your body would still crave tea. That's called, "addiction".

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