1

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Sashimi, some better than others?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 20, 2012 at 2:01 PM

A new sushi restaurant opened near campus and I've been going there about once a week. I get sashimi, which is served on a bed of radish (I assume it's radish... long crunchy almost-tasteless white strips). I put lemon on the sashimi and eat the ginger and wasabi with it. I've been trying out all the different kinds of fish, usually on recommendation from the chef who prepares it right there for me in a matter of seconds. I'm just wondering a few things:

are all sashimi considered paleo/primal, or are there some I need to stay away from?

is the side of miso soup okay? I've been passing on it.

there's a tea they serve that tastes like roasted brown rice? I've been drinking it, but I'm sure they'd serve me water if I asked.

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on November 15, 2012
at 08:12 AM

There is wheat powder in commercially prepared wasabi, and tobiko and salmon caviar are artificially dyed and contain other things that set my red flags off, sitting at the sushi bar yesterday trying to read the fine print but I'd check those out on your own and enjoy it if that is what you do.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on September 20, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Great tips, thanks!

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3 Answers

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4
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 03:26 PM

I love sashimi. Sushi used to be a goto for me. I quit when I went Primal. Then when we were out for a office-mate's birthday I decided to try sashimi and I LOVE IT.

The radish is almost certainly daikon which is a radish, but looks like a white carrot. It's perfectly primal!

All sashimi is considered primal (and delicious!)

Miso is fermented which lowers the levels of phytic acid. While not 100% primal it's not going to kill you. I ask for mine with extra seaweed and no tofu.

The tea is fine. It's either a green or black tea, given it smells like rice it's probably green.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on September 20, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Great tips, thanks!

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on November 15, 2012
at 08:12 AM

There is wheat powder in commercially prepared wasabi, and tobiko and salmon caviar are artificially dyed and contain other things that set my red flags off, sitting at the sushi bar yesterday trying to read the fine print but I'd check those out on your own and enjoy it if that is what you do.

3
707342e3cb97e0fc088917919a154b8a

on September 20, 2012
at 03:45 PM

PS If anyone finds sashimi too intimidating: order hand rolls without rice and ask for avocado (it takes the place of the 'bulk' that rice provides) or order rolls wrapped in cucumber instead of rice.

And I second Vern's recommendation of Coconut Aminos (I also bought packets of San-J Tamari which is gluten free-- I have them in my bag at all times).

2
Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on September 20, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Miso soup is typically made with tofu, which is soy milk curd that's been pressed together into blocks, sliced and put into the soup. The base of the soup is called dashi, which is seaweed and kelp, and fish stock. Then Miso paste is added. Miso is made by fermenting rice, barley and/or soybeans, usually soybeans. Not typically considered paleo.

The tea is likely fine, it's usually green tea. Never hurts to ask.

As for sashimi, if the fish seems fresh and you enjoy it, go for it. Save for slathering it (or anything) in soy sauce, you are likely fine. Soy sauce is soy beans and wheat and salt. If you are looking for something else besides ginger and wasabi, I do like coconut aminos on my sashimi. http://www.coconutsecret.com/aminos2.html

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