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Chebe Pizza Crust

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 15, 2012 at 5:40 PM

Does anyone know anything about Chebe Pizza crust mix? It's made from manioc flour (tapioca), which I believe comes from the yucca plant. Seems paleo enough...yes? Thanks

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 09, 2012
at 05:14 PM

I also hate the stupid flavorings they always put in pizza crust mixes. I've made pizza with the regular cheese bread mix (without adding any cheese) and I thought it came out fine.

71af94295988d55cd3b8340e619729d0

(255)

on January 16, 2012
at 02:23 PM

+1 for the pics..

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 15, 2012
at 07:12 PM

One of the better sources I've had for gluten free recipes has been the Brazilian food blog "come-se" http://come-se.blogspot.com/ (you just need to be able to make sense of the Google translation if you don't understand Brazilian Portuguese)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 15, 2012
at 07:09 PM

The pork crust would be very similar to Meatza as Richard Nikoley of Free The Animal (for one) blogged about.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 15, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Cassava, yuca, mogo, manioc for the plant, tapioca for the flour, and garri for the fermented flour.https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Manioc

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6 Answers

3
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on January 15, 2012
at 06:23 PM

I use chebe all the time. It's based on a Brazilian dish called pao de queijo (pronounced 'pown je cay-jo')... a tapioca-flour based cheese bread.

We've had some difficulty getting the mixes here in Houston, and can't get the frozen stuff anywhere any more, so now I make it at home.

2 tsp "Real" salt or sea salt 2 cups tapioca flour 1/4 cup melted butter 1/4 cup heavy cream, half-and-half, coconut milk, or stock 2 beaten eggs herbs/seasonings to taste

OPTIONAL: 2/3 cup hard shredded cheese like parmesan, asiago, romano, or a combination.

Mix salt and tapioca flour in a large bowl. Blend in (optional) cheese, if using. Mix melted butter, cream, and eggs together. Add to flour mixture and stir until all tapioca flour is incorporated. Oil hands, and press out to make pizza crusts, or roll into balls to make rolls.

Bake in 450 degree oven:

20 min... add toppings... 20 min more for pizza

15-25 min, or until crust begins to take color for rolls or breadsticks.

You can pre-mix the tapioca flour with salt and herbs, and keep it in the cupboard for quick breads/rolls.

Medium avatar

(2923)

on January 15, 2012
at 07:12 PM

One of the better sources I've had for gluten free recipes has been the Brazilian food blog "come-se" http://come-se.blogspot.com/ (you just need to be able to make sense of the Google translation if you don't understand Brazilian Portuguese)

2
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on January 16, 2012
at 07:31 AM

We tried 3 Chebe items in 2011. The pizza crust, the cheesy bread mix, and the cinnamon rolls. The pizza is decent, but it takes a bit of perfecting. If you don't cook it long enough, it comes out gooey. So on the second go around, we cooked the dough halfway first, then took it out after 10 minutes and added the sauce and toppings. Also, the herbs and spices in the mix is a pretty strong flavor, perhaps a bit too strong. Sometimes I wished that the pizza was just a plain dough with no added spices.

The cheesy bread mix is great. We've only made it once, but it turned out really nice for rolls.

The cinnamon rolls are good too and quite fun. We've made them twice and the second time we added blueberries which was a good move. You gotta be patient with them and cook them longer than the directions say, unless you like gooey dough.

And, like others have already mentioned, this is borderline. It's probably better than eating the wheat dough that this is designed to replace, but it's still eating a refined high carb starch so I wouldn't necessarily make this a staple. We probably make a chebe item less often than once per month. View it as a fun replacement for certain things every now and then and I think it's probably a better option than much of the other junk that's out there and it serves to satisfy the "bready" craving quite well.

Pizza with avocado, yellow peppers, serrano peppers, and sausage and homemade sauce chebe-pizza-crust

Cheesy rolls (you add your own cheese to the mix) chebe-pizza-crust

Blueberry cinnamon rolls (fresh blueberries do not come in the chebe box) (also, heavy cream is shown below, but we did not use it. I don't know how that cream made it's way into this picture) chebe-pizza-crust

71af94295988d55cd3b8340e619729d0

(255)

on January 16, 2012
at 02:23 PM

+1 for the pics..

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 09, 2012
at 05:14 PM

I also hate the stupid flavorings they always put in pizza crust mixes. I've made pizza with the regular cheese bread mix (without adding any cheese) and I thought it came out fine.

1
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on January 16, 2012
at 04:20 AM

Chebe is pretty good in moderation. It is very refined, which means you need to be careful if you have blood sugar issues and you need to brush your teeth afterwards. A place in Chicago called Cassava sells the frozen dough as pao de queijo and I have them sometimes as a post-workout snack.

1
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on January 15, 2012
at 06:12 PM

I consider starchy tubers to be okay, but I'm 99% sure someone will soon chime in with a "that's not paleo" response based on one arbitrary understandings of paleo or other. So I'll leave that argument to them.

My answer will focus instead on the culinary aspect of your question. Long before I ever started paleo, I tried a gluten-free diet. I experimented with various pizza crust replacements, and they all had one thing in common: they were uniformly dreadful. Tasteless, cardboard, mealy, off-flavors, etc. Basically, these horrible crusts ruined the otherwise awesome toppings I was using. The only one that approached palatability was a polenta crust--but that's not paleo either.

There's a pizzeria here in Chicago that makes a deep-dish pizza with a lowfat sausage crust for the gluten-free customers. I've not tried it, but it generally receives good notices in online reviews. This might be worthy of home experimenting. With all that extra protein, I'd suppose one would desire smaller portions.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 15, 2012
at 07:09 PM

The pork crust would be very similar to Meatza as Richard Nikoley of Free The Animal (for one) blogged about.

0
766203240584325b467bf87be5bfab5a

on May 09, 2012
at 04:58 PM

We just purchased some of the all purpose mix and made some rolls - they say to add cheese (optional) and milk or water. We left out the cheese and used water instead of milk. I did add some herbs to the mix, and I think the rolls were a pretty good substitute. They are a little dense, but if you are looking for an occasional way to have bread without having grain I think they are a great option. We are going to try using the all purpose mix for pizza dough so we can add our own herbs.

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