2

votes

What else can/should I do with suet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 14, 2011 at 11:19 PM

I just got 1.67 lbs of fresh grass fed suet! I plan on making my first attempt at rendering it tomorrow. If I just render the entire amount, how much would it ultimately yield? It's a pretty big block of fat so I don't want to waste any. Is there anything else that I can or should do with it besides making the tallow?

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:35 PM

It got eaten while the potatoes cooked!

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:13 PM

Dale, what happened to the bacon? :)

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:11 PM

AKD, I've heard that bear fat smells very bad. I find beef fat suffices for the things I need. Do you have a blog or a place on the internet where you've posted the bits of country wisdom? They'd be great to read. I like them, too. Hope you are doing well.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 15, 2011
at 03:17 AM

thank you! dont know that ill ever get my hands on bear fat again, but those are just the kinds of country wisdom bits that i collect and love dearly. that bear fat sure does stink like nothing else.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Akd, I find using animal fat on my skin keeps me warm and it seems to be very good for my skin. Hope you can get some bear fat again. If it smells strong while rendering, you can put in a potato, and the potato will soak up a lot of the smell.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:37 AM

oh my! this reminds me of my grandmother who used to rub bear fat into our skin up at camp in canada. my grandfather bagged a *cough* BABY *cough* bear, so we had to get slathered with bear fat EVERY NIGHT! we hated it! but now, im curious how she did it and wondered how i could recreate it. thank you!

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:30 AM

My grandmother used to cook a pound of bacon just to get the fat to fry potatoes then fried some eggs to put on top. I'll definitely have to try it with tallow.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:24 AM

Dale, wet rendering, especially in a crock pot is so easy. After it cooks, I let it cool, and then take off the solid fat on top.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:23 AM

Hi, Familygrokumentarain. :) Thanks for the kind thoughts. That afternoon seminar, in a farm house kitchen, or on the back deck, or something homey sounds grand!

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:22 AM

Oh yeah, I'm leaning towards wet. I saw a wet vs. dry thread before and it seems like most people preferred wet; plus I want to try the cracklins!

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:22 AM

Hi, Dale. If you have space in your freezer and you think you won't use up all of what you have very quickly, keeping the unused portion frozen will keep it from oxidizing (going rancid). You can also use rendered fat with lean meat to make meat loaf or burgers to get the 80% fat: 20% protein ratio, if desired. Have you decided on a rendering method?

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:15 AM

I love it! Do you think it's worth rendering just half of it and using the rest for something else? I'm not sure how much it will "cook down".

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on January 15, 2011
at 12:08 AM

This answer has paleo mentor written all over it. I can picture it now at a conference or seminar, for those who *aren't* attending the afternoon basics Paleo 102 session: "Intermediate Afternoon Seminar: PaleoGran Teaches You How to Make Lotion Bars and Salves from Beef Fat!"

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:08 AM

I guess to clarify a bit, should I render the whole thing or maybe just do some of it and do something else with the rest?

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:04 AM

Tim, thanks. That is the obvious use, isn't it?

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4 Answers

4
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on January 14, 2011
at 11:47 PM

Congratulations! :) I've never weighed mine before and after rendering. I just keep it in the freezer and render as I wish.

I usually render one pound at a time in my crockpot. If you have a six-quart pot, you can easily render 1.67 pounds. I like using the water method. Which rendering method are you using?

You could make pemmican. Here is Lex Rooker's How-To Manual for Making Pemmican:

http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf


General Recipe for lotion bars, for dry skin:

Equal parts: beeswax, beef fat, a liquid oil. Can combine whatever you have: sweet almond, walnut, olive, etc. Coconut oil is semi-hard, so adjust the recipe if using CO.

Use a double boiler and melt fats slowly. Stir. When completely melted, pour into empty plastic containers. I have neighbors save cream cheese containers for me.

As soon as the lotion bars are cool, turn out and use.

For making salve: 1/4 beeswax, 1/4 beef fat, and 2/4 liquid oils. Can add essential oils, if desired. Pour into sterile glass jars. This is great for lips, cuticles, elbows, heels, etc.

ETA: I ought to have included putting the fat in meatloaf and burgers, etc. to bring the fat ration up to what is desired. I try to keep the 80% fat: 20% protein that Dr. Richard MacKarness recommended in his book, "Eat Fat and Grow Slim:, and also Dr. Blake Donaldson, before him. His book is called "Strong Medicine".

Here is a link to Dr. MacKarness' book:

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/fat/

I do not know of Dr. Donaldon's book being online to read.

I was thinking about uses that might not be obvious, and forgot that some would like to know the standard uses of fat.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:15 AM

I love it! Do you think it's worth rendering just half of it and using the rest for something else? I'm not sure how much it will "cook down".

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 15, 2011
at 03:17 AM

thank you! dont know that ill ever get my hands on bear fat again, but those are just the kinds of country wisdom bits that i collect and love dearly. that bear fat sure does stink like nothing else.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:22 AM

Oh yeah, I'm leaning towards wet. I saw a wet vs. dry thread before and it seems like most people preferred wet; plus I want to try the cracklins!

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on January 15, 2011
at 12:08 AM

This answer has paleo mentor written all over it. I can picture it now at a conference or seminar, for those who *aren't* attending the afternoon basics Paleo 102 session: "Intermediate Afternoon Seminar: PaleoGran Teaches You How to Make Lotion Bars and Salves from Beef Fat!"

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:11 PM

AKD, I've heard that bear fat smells very bad. I find beef fat suffices for the things I need. Do you have a blog or a place on the internet where you've posted the bits of country wisdom? They'd be great to read. I like them, too. Hope you are doing well.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:43 AM

Akd, I find using animal fat on my skin keeps me warm and it seems to be very good for my skin. Hope you can get some bear fat again. If it smells strong while rendering, you can put in a potato, and the potato will soak up a lot of the smell.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:22 AM

Hi, Dale. If you have space in your freezer and you think you won't use up all of what you have very quickly, keeping the unused portion frozen will keep it from oxidizing (going rancid). You can also use rendered fat with lean meat to make meat loaf or burgers to get the 80% fat: 20% protein ratio, if desired. Have you decided on a rendering method?

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:24 AM

Dale, wet rendering, especially in a crock pot is so easy. After it cooks, I let it cool, and then take off the solid fat on top.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:23 AM

Hi, Familygrokumentarain. :) Thanks for the kind thoughts. That afternoon seminar, in a farm house kitchen, or on the back deck, or something homey sounds grand!

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:37 AM

oh my! this reminds me of my grandmother who used to rub bear fat into our skin up at camp in canada. my grandfather bagged a *cough* BABY *cough* bear, so we had to get slathered with bear fat EVERY NIGHT! we hated it! but now, im curious how she did it and wondered how i could recreate it. thank you!

2
0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

on January 15, 2011
at 12:03 AM

You can just shave bits of it into a pan to cook veggies, chicken, fish etc in, or cook burger in it to bring up the fat level.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:04 AM

Tim, thanks. That is the obvious use, isn't it?

1
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:13 AM

Tallow fried potatoes are awesome. I save my tallow for that mostly because it's so good.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:35 PM

It got eaten while the potatoes cooked!

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:13 PM

Dale, what happened to the bacon? :)

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on January 15, 2011
at 01:30 AM

My grandmother used to cook a pound of bacon just to get the fat to fry potatoes then fried some eggs to put on top. I'll definitely have to try it with tallow.

0
07d8ff43993e6739451e58ae7459cfe2

on March 08, 2013
at 05:32 AM

Suet is special tallow. Cherish it. It's fat from kidneys, and when well-rendered doesn't have the same beefy smell or taste as regular tallow.

Since it has a mild and delightful flavor, I suggest using regular tallow for savory foods and setting aside your suet for desserts and other foods that require subtler flavor.

When I rendered some fresh from the butcher awhile back, it was like some mix between palm oil and ghee. Obviously I'm a fan.

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