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Dry Paleo Sweetener

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 17, 2012 at 9:22 PM

I'm looking for a paleo sweetener for my paleo cookies. However, I want it to be a dry ingredient.

Does anyone know anything about honey powder? A lot that I find is mixed with cane sugar. Is there any out there that doesn't have cane sugar?

Also, does anyone have any suggestions as to any other "Paleo" sweetener that I can add to my baked goods? Again, I'm looking for a dry ingredient.

Thanks in advance!!!

--Dan

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on December 18, 2012
at 02:37 PM

'Fraid not, VB...

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 18, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Wow! I never even knew this stuff existed! But sugar is still sugar so I assume I cannot have it for SIBO, right?

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2 Answers

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Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on December 17, 2012
at 09:36 PM

I've had good success with finely ground dates as a sweetener. Finely ground raisins or currants would probably work as well, but dates tend to be more dry and easier to get to a nice texture, plus, as they are baked, they soften and spread nicely. At the beginning of winter solstice baking season, I buy a couple of pounds and run them through my food processor, so I have ground date ready to use. I use 1/2 cup of ground date for every cup of sugar called for in the recipe, though this ends up a good bit less sweet than the 'sugar' version -- I like it that way, but if I'm making it up for other people and they have a serious sweet tooth, I'll go with a 2:1 ratio of dates:sugar

I've also had good success using coconut sugar, which is less reactive in the glycemic index than honey. I tend to use coconut sugar on a 1:1 ratio with the white sugar called for in recipes, HOWEVER this creates an end product that is noticeably less sweet than the white-sugar counterpart. I'd guess that, in order to get the same level of sweetness, one would probably need to increase to 1.5 cups of coconut sugar to each cup of white sugar.

Another option, though it's an expensive one, is maple sugar. Maple sugar can be used 1:1 for white sugar, though I'm more likely to toss a tablespoon of it into my cup of coconut sugar for a little extra sweet kick in holiday goodies that others will be enjoying, like my Primalemon Bars.

One thing I -wouldn't- recommend is Xylitol, though I know some people swear by it. I've tried several recipes using it for cookies, and despite the claim that it "cooks, bakes, and sweetens 1:1 with sugar" it doesn't. My experience is that cookies and baked goods made with xylitol come out with a hyper-sweet, flat taste and are 'cold' in the mouth like they've had mint added to them, even when there's no mint at all.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on December 18, 2012
at 02:37 PM

'Fraid not, VB...

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 18, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Wow! I never even knew this stuff existed! But sugar is still sugar so I assume I cannot have it for SIBO, right?

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