2

votes

How do I de-sweeten sweet potatoes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 14, 2012 at 4:23 PM

I try eat a lot of sweet potatoes, but I don't really enjoy it. The flavor is generally fine to me for a few bites, but I quickly lose the will to continue eating even one whole sweet potato. To my taste buds, it's too sweet. Are there certain types/breeds of sweet potato that are less sweet? Is there a preparation that would be better for me? I typically eat 3-4 baked sweet potatoes per week.

FYI, I am trying to increase my caloric intake, and I need sources of healthy, cheap, and easy calories like sweet potatoes to work for me.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on March 16, 2012
at 04:36 AM

Ooh, ginger sounds like a great addition!

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on March 15, 2012
at 04:10 AM

Edward, that is an extremely out-of-date and erroneous oxalate list! For someone with a healthy digestive tract (no leaky gut and a good gut flora), you would only have to eliminate or greatly reduce the very highest oxalate foods to reduce the antinutrient effect of oxalate (the highest oxalate foods are spinach, rhubarb, peanuts, most tree nuts and chocolate). For people with leaky guts, you might want to reduce all high oxalate foods (this is where I stand). For accurate oxalate info go to: http://lowoxalateinfo.com or http://lowoxalate.info

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:16 AM

Yeah, I find the asian/japanese sweet potato to be almost cloyingly sweet.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:14 AM

I was unfamiliar with oxalates.. Interesting!

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 15, 2012
at 01:12 AM

My Japanese sweet potatoes are salty and dangle between my legs.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 15, 2012
at 01:10 AM

That eliminates a lot of foods: http://goo.gl/xOOSc

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 15, 2012
at 12:47 AM

+1 for cayenne -- I also sprinkle powdered ginger on mine sometimes. Heating up the flavors a little seems to balance out the sweet, for me.

F38ece2204c6ab63fef7887e9f4e30d2

(100)

on March 14, 2012
at 09:20 PM

I agree about the rice. I cook it with turmeric and I have some every day with olive oil and/or butter and sun-dried tomato bits. Yum.

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

(1453)

on March 14, 2012
at 07:13 PM

OK, it just seems like if you don't like them, there's no particular need to eat them. What about something like white rice, a la Perfect Health Diet? I've been really enjoying that as an addition to my diet lately with no ill effects.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 14, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Interesting. My (Japanese?) unlabeled tubers are white and almost sugarless. Also, they have a wicked cross-over dribble.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 14, 2012
at 05:34 PM

I dunno man, the "Japanese Sweet Potato" that I get that has totally white flesh (and can't jump worth shit, for what it's worth) is *much* sweeter than the orange-fleshed varieties.

4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

(646)

on March 14, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Yes, I put about 10g of butter on the sweet potato. I usually eat them as a side to my meal (veg, meat), and I never considered stacking it together. I'll try that. Thanks.

4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

(646)

on March 14, 2012
at 04:38 PM

I do eat white potatoes, but I'm looking for a way to increase my enjoyment of sweet potatoes.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 14, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Just a question--are you putting butter on them? One thing I do is use a sweet potato as the base of a "stack" with a non-starchy vegetable (usually green) and some meat. The blend of flavors tones down the strong flavor of the sweet for me.

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8 Answers

7
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on March 14, 2012
at 04:42 PM

Japanese sweet potatoes are less sweet to me, they are dryer and have more of a chestnutty flavour. You could also incorporate 1/2 sweet into 1/2 tuber for a little variety and to cut the "sweet" or just go the way of the tuber. IMO if you don't like it - don't eat it :)

Using any sort of savoury ingredients will definitely change the flavour profiles. Miso. Scallion. Garlic. Hot sauce. A little bit of tinkering and you'll find something that works for you.

EDIT I was thinking when running errands about a few other things you could do. Cube up small and add to a curry. Small cubes, roast, then add to salads especially something with avocado and chicken, some lime juice, cilantro. Think "Mexi-salad." Smash with some really earthy veg or smash with coconut milk and some red curry paste. Do you like Old Bay? Sprinkle that on and it's the jam.

6
1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on March 14, 2012
at 04:54 PM

I cube them, toss them in some melted ghee, garlic, salt, smoked paprika, cayenne, and then bake them until they're tender. I am not a fan of "sweet" sweet potatoes, either, and this preparation seems to make them more savory than anything, and pretty delicious.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 15, 2012
at 12:47 AM

+1 for cayenne -- I also sprinkle powdered ginger on mine sometimes. Heating up the flavors a little seems to balance out the sweet, for me.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on March 16, 2012
at 04:36 AM

Ooh, ginger sounds like a great addition!

3
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 14, 2012
at 05:07 PM

1. The lighter, the better

My grocery store in Chinatown, as well as the nearest Whole Foods, both have a few varieties of sweet potato. The lighter-fleshed ones have less sugar. Hold on...that sounded kind of racist. I'm not racist, I swear!

2. Soup

One way to dilute the sweet taste of sweet potato is to make a thin sweet potato soup. Also, you can split it half sweet potato, half pumpkin, or anything else with a low amount of sugar.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 14, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Interesting. My (Japanese?) unlabeled tubers are white and almost sugarless. Also, they have a wicked cross-over dribble.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 15, 2012
at 01:12 AM

My Japanese sweet potatoes are salty and dangle between my legs.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:16 AM

Yeah, I find the asian/japanese sweet potato to be almost cloyingly sweet.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 14, 2012
at 05:34 PM

I dunno man, the "Japanese Sweet Potato" that I get that has totally white flesh (and can't jump worth shit, for what it's worth) is *much* sweeter than the orange-fleshed varieties.

2
E2123e1da4ccbe211c9cbd82356fe4bc

on March 15, 2012
at 12:21 AM

I'm fond of sweet potato fries. Cut a raw sweet potato into fry-like spears, cook them in coconut oil until crispy and brown on the outside and season with garlic powder, thyme, pepper, and whatever else floats your boat. Also, a dip made of paleo mayonnaise, chili sauce and garlic is a fine idea.

2
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on March 14, 2012
at 07:50 PM

I personally never eat sweet potatoes because of their high oxalate content (oxalate is an anti-nutrient). I find other starchy low or medium oxalate veggies like turnips, rutabega, butternut squash, pumpkin and acorn squash much tastier and more satisfying, not to mention much more nutritious.

If you really want to eat them, however, you might try mixing sweet potatoes with other starchy tubers like white potatoes or turnips -- either mashed or roasted. Eating them with other veggies instead of alone really seems to cut the strong taste.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:14 AM

I was unfamiliar with oxalates.. Interesting!

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 15, 2012
at 01:10 AM

That eliminates a lot of foods: http://goo.gl/xOOSc

B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on March 15, 2012
at 04:10 AM

Edward, that is an extremely out-of-date and erroneous oxalate list! For someone with a healthy digestive tract (no leaky gut and a good gut flora), you would only have to eliminate or greatly reduce the very highest oxalate foods to reduce the antinutrient effect of oxalate (the highest oxalate foods are spinach, rhubarb, peanuts, most tree nuts and chocolate). For people with leaky guts, you might want to reduce all high oxalate foods (this is where I stand). For accurate oxalate info go to: http://lowoxalateinfo.com or http://lowoxalate.info

2
D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

on March 14, 2012
at 04:34 PM

So why not just eat regular potatoes, then?

4a7929c2aa05bf11349d9e55cb542d47

(646)

on March 14, 2012
at 04:38 PM

I do eat white potatoes, but I'm looking for a way to increase my enjoyment of sweet potatoes.

F38ece2204c6ab63fef7887e9f4e30d2

(100)

on March 14, 2012
at 09:20 PM

I agree about the rice. I cook it with turmeric and I have some every day with olive oil and/or butter and sun-dried tomato bits. Yum.

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

(1453)

on March 14, 2012
at 07:13 PM

OK, it just seems like if you don't like them, there's no particular need to eat them. What about something like white rice, a la Perfect Health Diet? I've been really enjoying that as an addition to my diet lately with no ill effects.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:42 AM

How about Taro or some other starch? You really aren't going to de-sweeten a SWEET Potato.

0
90059b56fd16d907eb92aeb498205173

(20)

on March 15, 2012
at 02:09 AM

a breakfast has is great also!! sweet potato + any combo of carrots, turnips, radishes, and/or any tuber/root is really good. cut them up,toss them in butter, garlic, ginger, cayenne, and sale bake them toss some meat on it (ground beef,deer, etc is awesome) crack some eggs over top broil it for a minute or so (keep an eye on it, the eggs cook super quick)

mmm mmm good! :)

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