3

votes

Overheating with Activity

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 04, 2011 at 2:25 AM

Its summer, and its Hot. but my ability to tolerate the heat has gone up considerably.

I used to have to have the Air Conditioning set at 65, sweat constantly sitting around. Now that Ive lost all the weight, i keep my house at 80 degrees and im comfortable.

But It seems with Physical activity, my body temp goes up Dramatically and quickly. I hydrate plenty, over a gallon of water a day. I sweat like a pig. No Hydration issues... but I heat up super fast, and short of jumping in the lake/cold Shower, I dont cool off quickly. I dont have any fat insulating me anymore.

So why am I heating up so fast and not cooling down quickly when I participate in my beloved sporting activities?

*edit: wanted to add im of Northern European heritage, perhaps this has something to do with my heat tolerance? I do just fine in really cold weather.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 05, 2011
at 01:29 AM

It's not the heat, we aren't at 120, but Atlanta has been over 100 recently and I can deal... It's heating up an cooling off from exercise

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on August 05, 2011
at 01:15 AM

nice, i live in south mississippi, heat index in the 120's without A/C at all...you adjust

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:19 PM

ha, well short term - avoid spicy. If it's a long term thing the slowly re-condition your body ;)

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:12 PM

Reduce spicy but eat more spicy??

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:11 PM

I eat potassium rich tubers post workout and have a generic natural calm on non workout days... Not sure loads of sugar is a good idea for me tho... I get warm from eating it, feel my bloodsugar spike

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on August 04, 2011
at 08:03 PM

? .

34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on August 04, 2011
at 02:41 AM

Good to see you're still kicking around, Stephen-Aegis!

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4 Answers

1
34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on August 12, 2011
at 06:33 AM

I've had similar experiences. I would attribute it to either a change in lean body mass, i.e. more muscle tissue that could produce more heat when active or a change in brown adipose tissue which could be responsible for non-shivering heat production.

For myself it is likely a combination of the two. At a relaxed state, high temperatures (in low humidity) are no problem for me. But any sort of intense effort leads to profuse, instantaneous sweating. Waves of heat radiate from me year round. I also take much longer to cool off than most.

Like you I would attribute some of it to genetic heritage. I try to embrace it like using a lighter 50* sleeping bag when I climb and snorkeling without a wetsuit when surveying rivers. Having more or less body fat does have a slight effect for me. But the only time I've ever felt cold on a regular basis as an adult was following an extreme weight loss experiment which resulted in a huge loss of lean muscle mass.

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on August 12, 2011
at 04:51 AM

i can only speculate that your heart rate has gone done on the paleo diet and with the lower heart rate comes better heat tolerance. profuse sweating during exercise is normal

0
7d83ccd72dcdba9b8947598be6459e02

on August 04, 2011
at 07:55 PM

You probably need more potassium. Try eating more foods with potassium like watermelon and bananas.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on August 04, 2011
at 08:03 PM

? .

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:11 PM

I eat potassium rich tubers post workout and have a generic natural calm on non workout days... Not sure loads of sugar is a good idea for me tho... I get warm from eating it, feel my bloodsugar spike

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 04, 2011
at 03:38 AM

no hard science here but a couple of thoughts....

It may help to have some herbs/spices like coriander, basil, fennel, turmeric, cardamom, and foods that are cooling and calming, sweet, bitter and astringent like coconut, carrots, leafy greens,cucumber, watermelon, steamed greens. Also try sipping cool (not iced) water throughout the day. And try to reduce spicy, salty, oily and sour foods such as chilis, pickles, and citrus fruits.

We can look to cultures who live around the equator that eat spicy food and wind up downregulating their body temps in some way. It seems like acute doses of spices foods will warm you up, but constant usage (think indian and mexican foods) may keep your body cooler.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:19 PM

ha, well short term - avoid spicy. If it's a long term thing the slowly re-condition your body ;)

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 04, 2011
at 09:12 PM

Reduce spicy but eat more spicy??

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