2

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Making my own sushi/sashimi

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 08, 2011 at 11:28 AM

So, I've just came back from a fishing trip with some Cod and Mackerel.

Since I like sushi/sashimi, I would like to try i out. As a bonus, I assume it is for the best considering the nutritional aspect.

Does anyone here have som DIY tips and tricks for me? I've heard the fish should be frozen to kill parasites etc.

Thanks for reading.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 08, 2011
at 03:52 PM

Hardest thing is to get the rice right. I also learned to fillet as kid but, but we never made fillets as clean as japanese do their sashimi. Its smooth as glass. I recommend this cookbook for japanese cooking: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Japanese-Cooking-Simple-Shizuo-Tsuji/dp/0870113992 I bought it mainly for soups and other dishes, i cant do sushi right.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on August 08, 2011
at 02:28 PM

Thank you Jan. He seemed to have a lot of nice dishes. Making the filets is not a problem, I've learned that as a kid :)

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on August 08, 2011
at 12:14 PM

I caught the fish myself, so it is in deed fresh and all points are satisfied.

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5 Answers

5
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 08, 2011
at 12:03 PM

The things sushi chefs look for in their fish--

The eyes should be clear.

The gills should be bright red, no slime.

The scales should not come off easily.

When you press the fish, the skin should "bounce back" as if one pressed one's own forearm or cheeks.

It should not have any fishy smell.

And yes, sashimi-grade fish is frozen in the US, Canada, and Europe, mainly due to health regulations. The only fish that doesn't need to be frozen is tuna, and that's only because it isn't prone to parasites.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends freezing at ???35??C (???31??F) for 15 hours, or at ???20??C (???4??F) for 7 days.[5]

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on August 08, 2011
at 12:14 PM

I caught the fish myself, so it is in deed fresh and all points are satisfied.

2
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 08, 2011
at 01:29 PM

I have learned alot from this guys videos how to prep fish. He is doing it really slowly for the video :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVFMjmb_Cf0&feature=channel_page

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 08, 2011
at 03:52 PM

Hardest thing is to get the rice right. I also learned to fillet as kid but, but we never made fillets as clean as japanese do their sashimi. Its smooth as glass. I recommend this cookbook for japanese cooking: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Japanese-Cooking-Simple-Shizuo-Tsuji/dp/0870113992 I bought it mainly for soups and other dishes, i cant do sushi right.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on August 08, 2011
at 02:28 PM

Thank you Jan. He seemed to have a lot of nice dishes. Making the filets is not a problem, I've learned that as a kid :)

1
F5a8a14fc6a4d33c2563d0dd3066698a

(714)

on August 30, 2011
at 11:23 AM

Here's the skinny on fish parasites.

The anecdotal evidence I've always used is don't worry about it in saltwater fish you've caught yourself. Nematodes are what you might worry about, but you probably eat things already every day that are more likely to make you sick. Nematodes do not find us to be a suitable host. If you're talking freshwater fish, though-- some eels, and trout come to mind as suitable sashimi freshwater fish-- you can theoretically get a tapeworm. So definitely freeze them.

As for prep, just cut your hunks such that you end up with the grain going across the short side of the piece. There are, of course, many rules and techniques beyond that. But that's the big issue to ensure you can easily bite through a larger hunk.

0
5d6a58590ba76136e8dc50c561c8ada2

(450)

on August 08, 2011
at 12:17 PM

I've also heard that the fish should be frozen, but not kept in the freezer too long. I assume your fish is pretty fresh since you caught it. I'd probably just cut it up and eat it, to be honest, but I'm pretty adventurous with food :) You could also maybe try doing a light ceviche so that it cooks slightly in an acid... Another preparation would be to cure it (like how lox is made).

0
1bc18852894dad9d6dddfb3dfed49ab3

(341)

on August 08, 2011
at 12:05 PM

There is no such thing as "sushi-grade" fish. I think the only regulation is all fish must be delivered to the restaurants and markets already frozen. So I'm thinking freezing your catch ASAP will make the most fresh sushi.

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