2

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Do you make your own sushi?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 16, 2012 at 8:24 AM

Do you make your own raw salmon sushi? If so what precautions do you take?

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on February 19, 2012
at 03:57 PM

That sounds awesome. Does she make kimchi as well?

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 16, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Use sushi grade salmon (i.e., salmon frozen long enough so that the worms and parasites are killed). If you use fresh salmon you will be sorry.

3bad4b0b105bf44d7650e7fdfbe15cbd

(860)

on February 16, 2012
at 09:18 PM

Kelly, that likely wouldn't work. Sushi stays together because of the sticky rice. Unless you can find a way to make the cauliflower sticky, I expect everything would just fall apart.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 16, 2012
at 07:50 PM

There is a super primo fish market in my city and they sell "sushi grade" fish. The fishmonger told me that its fish that have been treated differently and more carefully from the get-go and all the way along the line. Better safe than sorry.

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on February 16, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Interesting, I had no idea there were no regulations as to what can be classified as 'sushi grade' in the US. I live in Japan where 'sashimi grade' (sushi just means vinegared rice, sashimi means raw fish/meat) is only applied to extremely fresh fish which has eihter been frozen to kill off parasites or otherwise treated to make it safe to consume raw. I would never eat salmon I bought in the UK raw unless from a Japanese fishmonger who assured me it was sashimi-grade.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on February 16, 2012
at 04:56 PM

has anyone ever made 'california' type rolls but with cauliflower rice instead of rice? i've been thinking about trying but would be nice to know if its a good idea or waste of time and ingredients.....

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:56 PM

In total agreement there. My MIL can make it for me, but she's retired and has nothing better to do other than cook delicious Korean food.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:52 PM

Thank You Matt!!! Yes food safety! I hear you on the land locked. But I am on the coast...

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Thank You Kurt!!!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:33 PM

Ok, food safety is what folks are thinking? Sadly I'm so land-locked that I stick to "cooked" sushi. Tamago is my favorite. Though I eat it for the rice/nori as much as anything.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:02 PM

I was told to freeze salmon before using it for sashimi or sushi to kill any parasites.

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6 Answers

5
A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

on February 16, 2012
at 02:05 PM

Sushi is one thing that I don't hesitate to pay a professional for.

193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:56 PM

In total agreement there. My MIL can make it for me, but she's retired and has nothing better to do other than cook delicious Korean food.

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on February 19, 2012
at 03:57 PM

That sounds awesome. Does she make kimchi as well?

1
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on February 17, 2012
at 05:42 PM

I have made sushi and sashimi from raw salmon. I always take the paranoid approach to seafood, i.e. I take far fewer liberties in handling raw seafood than I do with raw steak. However, it is still possible for the home cook to get great seafood and handle it up to my standard.

Do your homework first. Find the fishmonger who seems most concerned with quality and the best ingredients. Read up on them; read reviews if any such exist. Don't select on price; especially with sushi, a little fish goes a long way, and better is always better than cheaper. This is also a good reason to pick a small shop over a supermarket fish counter.

If there isn't a huge line, your fishmonger should be able to engage in conversation about what fish is good for your intended dish. I've gotten great suggestions this way, both for making lightly seared steak sushi (sirloin tip steak) and for salmon sushi (King salmon). You might be offered samples of the raw fish, if you're lucky. If your fishmonger never eats his own product raw, you probably want to choose another fishmonger.

Buy what's in season. I love tuna above all raw preparations, but if salmon is available and tuna is not, it's going to be beautiful fresh salmon rather than disappointing looking tuna in little vacuum packs.

If you have to drive a long way (30 minutes or more), especially in the summer, bring a cooler and some ice packs with you.

Transfer the fish to your fridge as soon as you get home. Use it within 2-3 days, cook and eat whatever remains after that. It's not a big deal to leave the fish in the butcher paper, but some corners that are not in direct contact with the paper may dry out or get fishy. Use a sharp knife and shave off the outer layer where this happens. What's underneath will be fine.

1
E71731506df3416144f7cb621e7aa704

(30)

on February 17, 2012
at 05:03 PM

I usually buy smoked salmon - because I see "sushi grade" raw fish in stores, but I'm not sure I want to take the risk. Maybe smoked salmon is a bad idea, I don't know, but I find it quite yummy. I love to roll it up in seaweed with cucumber and avocado - I don't mind a little rice, but I often skip it for time reasons.

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 16, 2012
at 09:24 PM

I wrap lots of different foods, including raw fish, into nori. I do not use rice, so I guess by that yardstick then no, I am not making sushi. Cold scrambled egg, raw salmon, bacon, and avocado rolls - very good.

I also have a fish market about 4 miles from my house that is attached to a dock, so I do have the benefit of being able to get fresh (as in caught less than 2 hours prior) warm water fish - but that's very occasional for me (don't care for most warm-water fish). For those fishies I'd rather make ceviche.

1
Febcfb45a6bec019a69101cfa8104d30

(463)

on February 16, 2012
at 01:09 PM

I make my own as well. I generally use only fish that has been frozen, because freezing below a certain temperature and for a certain time (I don't remember the exact details now) kills the parasites. However, it is generally unlikely that a human can become a host to a fish parasite.

As far as microbes go, I just use fresh fish, don't leave it sitting out, eat wasabi with my sushi (which has some anti-microbial effects, according to the Japanese), and hope for the best. I've eaten a lot of sushi and haven't gotten sick yet.

One interesting thing I found in researching the topic is that the label "sushi grade" that you see sometimes in stores has no actual meaning according to any regulatory agency or advisory group. Any store can put "sushi grade" on whatever fish they like, so it usually just means that they consider it especially fresh or suitable for sushi in some way.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:51 PM

Thank You Kurt!!!

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on February 16, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Interesting, I had no idea there were no regulations as to what can be classified as 'sushi grade' in the US. I live in Japan where 'sashimi grade' (sushi just means vinegared rice, sashimi means raw fish/meat) is only applied to extremely fresh fish which has eihter been frozen to kill off parasites or otherwise treated to make it safe to consume raw. I would never eat salmon I bought in the UK raw unless from a Japanese fishmonger who assured me it was sashimi-grade.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on February 16, 2012
at 07:50 PM

There is a super primo fish market in my city and they sell "sushi grade" fish. The fishmonger told me that its fish that have been treated differently and more carefully from the get-go and all the way along the line. Better safe than sorry.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 16, 2012
at 12:20 PM

I've been known to make my own. Don't know what precautions you think one needs to take. Sushi is pretty paleo, assuming you're not anti-rice.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on February 16, 2012
at 03:52 PM

Thank You Matt!!! Yes food safety! I hear you on the land locked. But I am on the coast...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:02 PM

I was told to freeze salmon before using it for sashimi or sushi to kill any parasites.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:33 PM

Ok, food safety is what folks are thinking? Sadly I'm so land-locked that I stick to "cooked" sushi. Tamago is my favorite. Though I eat it for the rice/nori as much as anything.

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