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Whooping Cough in the Paleo world

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 06, 2010 at 12:07 PM

My 7 year old grandson has just been diagnosed with Whooping Cough. I am in fairly regular contact with him. Given that my increased Vit D3 intake seems to be providing me good common cold protection, (haven't had even a sniffle for years) could I expect any level of protection from this more virulent disease due to my strict paleo lifestyle? It's extremely annoying that these diseases that were almost eradicated seem to be on the rise.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on January 13, 2011
at 06:48 AM

No, of course not. But being surrounded by people who seem to constantly catching the simplest sniffle (school kids) and are always getting sick I have been more that 2 years without anything. I used to consider a week or two with the flu a year pretty good going before that. I think there is at least anecdotal evidence that D3 helps.

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6 Answers

3
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on December 06, 2010
at 03:55 PM

I got the booster. It seemed like a pretty clear benefit to boost my immunity and help protect kids.

1
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on December 07, 2010
at 02:40 AM

Vitamin D has many salutary effects, including immunomodulatory benefits.

The strongest evidence for the benefit of prevention and/or treatment of infections with vitamin D is for influenza, upper respiratory (cold) viruses and tuberculosis (reference).

I see no reason why vitamin D wouldn't help prevent whooping cough (pertussis), but I'm not aware that it's been studied.

There is a whooping cough vaccine available for adults, called Tdap (tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis). Since pertussis infection is usually not serious in adults (often indistinguishable from a common cold), the reason for adults to get the vaccine is to decrease the spread of the bacteria to infants and young children. The vaccine is indicated for health care workers as well as parents (and grandparents) of infants and small children. The protection against whooping cough from the vaccine will wear off after 5 to 7 years.

1
617bb72346a919f9e924d75e4709a5f0

on December 06, 2010
at 12:37 PM

I eat strict paleo. I used to work in a daycare and one day I learned that a child was absent due to the fact her older sister had contracted the whooping cough. I didn't know that I had caught it until I had already recovered from it. It's not nearly as bad on adults as children. If you've been vaccinated against it, you can still catch it. I had a bad cough but what really led me to believe that I had contracted it was a random nose bleed which is a symptom only in adults. I managed to dodge all the flus that went around but caught this. Eating right definitely help wards things like this off and increases recovery time if you do get it. There's definitely nothing wrong with upping your D3 for a few days though there's not a whole lot more you can do that I know of. I wasn't really sick just coughing deeply so if you do get it, you probably won't be stuck in bed.

0
1715baf59062365d57a046fa354b1eb9

on February 10, 2012
at 09:39 AM

No denying that people need more D. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vitamin-d/

The question is how much for each individual. Genetic selection via latitude may play a role in an individuals D needs. Ie northern inuit in the North West Territories of the Canadian Wilderness evolved perhaps a stronger capacity to absorb digestively D. And in the equatorial regions, the peoples from which originate may better intake and make D via the SUN's UVB rays which penetrate most strongly. Irish being so white in the sun Burns their skin, ruing their ability to make D is one hypothesis for Northern Europeans of fair skin complection.

Really the only way to know if you are receiving the right dose is the get a blood test. But I suspect overall that a sun rich inheritance of patterns shaped by centuries of intense UV may have differential consequences upon those who stray into the darkness by day too often.

0
034c678bff434ab3781e3f1771018af9

(279)

on January 13, 2011
at 06:21 AM

I wouldn't necessarily attribute your not having a cold to D3 consumption. Correlation is not causation, you know?

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on January 13, 2011
at 06:48 AM

No, of course not. But being surrounded by people who seem to constantly catching the simplest sniffle (school kids) and are always getting sick I have been more that 2 years without anything. I used to consider a week or two with the flu a year pretty good going before that. I think there is at least anecdotal evidence that D3 helps.

0
525ceb06bc8862932d853a033411e3b7

(350)

on January 12, 2011
at 08:58 PM

Agreed. Get the booster if you're concerned.

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