2

votes

What is the form of magnesium 'naturally' found in water?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 11, 2010 at 10:15 PM

Hi Guys,

I've been doing some research on the best form and dosage of magnesium, but I am quite surprised by the various different types you can get: ascorbate, aspartate, chelate, citrate, glycinate, malate, oxide, plus more! Even more worrying (to me!) is some forms give some people diarrhoea, whilst others are fine.

So as the title suggests, what form of magnesium would Grok have been consuming in his natural lake/river water?

33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on March 12, 2010
at 05:21 PM

I eat grey salt called 'Sel de Guerande' or (Grey Celtic Sea salt) which we find in the supermarkets here. It has not been mechanically processed in any way, is harvested by hand (and has been since the Iron Age) from natural salt beds along coast of Brittany in France and contains a high level of minerals including magnesium. It is wet and sticky and looks nothing like table salt (sodium chloride). Perhpas this is something you could look at taking?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 12, 2010
at 01:33 AM

Random tip, but apparently according to my soil science professor, Fire Island in NY is very rich in magnesium. So if you have a chance to eat food grown there...go for it.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:57 AM

Grok may be around but some of our magnesium isn't. ;-)

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 12, 2010
at 12:30 AM

Technically Grok is still around all over the world as the last remaining 'modern' hunter gatherer populations...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:05 AM

In Canada we drink water from a creek on the neighbour's lot. Fish piss in it.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:04 AM

I wasn't actually an answer- hence the comment format.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:03 AM

Well, if Grok was around a long time ago and our magnesium levels are now depleting due to intense farming practices in modern times, Grok was luckier than us and had good old magnesium.

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:02 AM

@Cave: soft water does have Mg removed (often replaced with sodium). The problem isn't so much that the body can no longer get Mg from that water. Rather, water is a solvent; it will wash minerals out of the body. If the water you drink has Mg in it already, then it can't pull as much out of the body. However, I think that whole area is a very minor issue. Kidney leakage of Mg, which can be caused by high blood glucose levels, is much more significant than how much Mg your water has in it.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on March 11, 2010
at 11:43 PM

Good points Rick. Some folks can't tolerate Mg-citrate due to diarrhea. I've recently gotten some Mg-glycinate from http://www.vitaminshoppe.com which has not caused any distress for me so far

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 11, 2010
at 11:27 PM

I don't understand? Can you clarify what you mean by old?

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 11, 2010
at 11:26 PM

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/magnesium-and-inflammation/

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 11, 2010
at 11:25 PM

Thank you Rick! Any chance you can explain/put into context this statement from Dr Eades? "Another reason that many people are magnesium deficient is that they drink bottled water or softened water. In the old days everyone drank well water or water from streams, both of which contain large amounts of magnesium. Magnesium is removed when water is softened and it isn???t in large amounts in most of the bottled waters that are available. Our favorite readily available bottled water is Apollinaris, which has a pretty good magnesium level."

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 11, 2010
at 10:52 PM

Old. Just plain old.

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1 Answers

5
5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

on March 11, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Mg in river water is generally in ionic form (Mg+2), though it can also be hydroxide. However, the concentrations are normally very low, roughly 2 ppm--which really isn't enough to be considered a dietary source.

Animal products are an excellent source of Mg, and of course Mg is at the center of the chlorophyll molecule, so green plants are another good source.

As far as supplements go, the most absorbable forms are the amino acid chelates, such as glycinate or aspartate. Mg Citrate is good because it's inexpensive and easy to take in quantity (for example, Natural Calm). The worst / least absorbable form is magnesium oxide.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:05 AM

In Canada we drink water from a creek on the neighbour's lot. Fish piss in it.

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 11, 2010
at 11:25 PM

Thank you Rick! Any chance you can explain/put into context this statement from Dr Eades? "Another reason that many people are magnesium deficient is that they drink bottled water or softened water. In the old days everyone drank well water or water from streams, both of which contain large amounts of magnesium. Magnesium is removed when water is softened and it isn???t in large amounts in most of the bottled waters that are available. Our favorite readily available bottled water is Apollinaris, which has a pretty good magnesium level."

4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on March 11, 2010
at 11:26 PM

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/uncategorized/magnesium-and-inflammation/

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on March 11, 2010
at 11:43 PM

Good points Rick. Some folks can't tolerate Mg-citrate due to diarrhea. I've recently gotten some Mg-glycinate from http://www.vitaminshoppe.com which has not caused any distress for me so far

5ebeec76e20738d0a17cd724d64b1e0f

(1922)

on March 12, 2010
at 12:02 AM

@Cave: soft water does have Mg removed (often replaced with sodium). The problem isn't so much that the body can no longer get Mg from that water. Rather, water is a solvent; it will wash minerals out of the body. If the water you drink has Mg in it already, then it can't pull as much out of the body. However, I think that whole area is a very minor issue. Kidney leakage of Mg, which can be caused by high blood glucose levels, is much more significant than how much Mg your water has in it.

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