3

votes

Vitamin D supplements

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 12, 2010 at 7:57 PM

Does anyone have a good recommendation for a vitamin D supplement? I can only find 1000 iu pills, and that would mean taking 6-8 of the things a day. Being rediculously fair-skinned, I'm limited in how much sun I can handle right now, so I'm trying to make up for it in the diet. Thanks!!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on October 13, 2010
at 06:30 PM

This is what I use, and i have enjoyed health improvements since taking vit d!

2ac40062935f569c9a86493f7177d2a0

(233)

on May 24, 2010
at 09:34 PM

Thanks for the note. Saw that my Carlson's D tabs were mixed with sunflower oil. Bought new ones. Aargh.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on April 05, 2010
at 12:47 PM

I recently started using these as well. Good stuff.

9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 16, 2010
at 09:16 PM

D supplements will shorten your telomeres and prematurely age your whole body,not just the skin. UV exposure ages skin by a different mechanism than excess D (D by UVB mediated synthesis is strictly limited which should tell you something) The sun that gets through glass (mainly UVA wich does not make D) will age skin. Salmon are obviously not typical fish moreover are only available in quantity during a salmon run. Eating other fish would supply far less. Over a year the Inuit were getting more of their vitamin D from the sun on their face then from fish I think.

Df11e66ec4dd4f749eca409633b6a3fb

(595)

on February 15, 2010
at 02:18 PM

I should clarify, that I'm hoping to up my D intake partially to increase my ability to be in the sun. Being D-deficient makes for more delicate skin. Hopefully, sun-related D will be more accessable once my diet's worked out.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:26 PM

That said some would argue that it's far better to have a regular intake of vitamin from supplements, rather than very large doses infrequently. Apparantly large fluctuating doses could be worse than a steady, but smaller dose. http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2009/12/vitamin-d-and-uv-fluctuations.html

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 14, 2010
at 03:14 AM

PS. I tried to vote this down but don't have a 100+ rep. (yet... hint hint ;-)

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 14, 2010
at 03:11 AM

Hey, who can forget the sun-baked prune old-lady stereotype? Is the sun damage from UV to the dermis cells' nucleus, or from too much D? However, suggesting 0 D supplement is not supportable by any facts. I didn't see what an equivalent D dosage the altered mice were experiencing would be, did you? All that study established was a U-shaped response curve which everyone already agrees over. The D Council recommends a max serum D of 80-100 ng/ml. But, what is modern human's sun exposure these days? How much salmon do we eat? By your accounting 1000IU/day is a not unreasonable 6 oz of salmon.

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 13, 2010
at 02:40 AM

I like Healthy Origins too. I get the 2,400 IU version so I can give my kids 1/day and I take 2-4/day depending on my whims.

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21 Answers

best answer

5
77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:13 PM

5,000 IU pills from iherb.com

These are the cheapest I've found. There is also a 10,000 IU version that is even cheaper per IU, but for now the 5,000 IU are serving me just fine.

I have a coupon code for $5 off your first purchase. I don't want to be accused of spamming by posting it here, though (since I make a small amount of money, like 83 cents or something silly, if you use the code).

If you want the coupon code, let me know and I'll figure out a way to get it to you. (Or post your email address here, I guess.)

52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on February 13, 2010
at 02:40 AM

I like Healthy Origins too. I get the 2,400 IU version so I can give my kids 1/day and I take 2-4/day depending on my whims.

4
Cc93847bfa820f0f2da654060b401fa5

(746)

on February 13, 2010
at 04:09 AM

I use dirt cheap NOW 5k sofgels. The 5k are in olive oil, where the 2k are in soy I believe. I also take with coconut oil usually. The rest of my D comes from CLO.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on April 05, 2010
at 12:47 PM

I recently started using these as well. Good stuff.

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on October 13, 2010
at 06:30 PM

This is what I use, and i have enjoyed health improvements since taking vit d!

4
90754eb77fa3835526151624ce6c4ea8

on February 13, 2010
at 12:41 AM

I've just switched over to these:

http://www.carlsonlabs.com/p-244-solar-d-gems-2000-iu.aspx

2000IU gelcaps, and, they're in cod liver oil, so at my 6,000IU I'm getting about 630 mg of omega 3s. So, I reduced my 1g fish oils from 2 caps to 1, and I take a 500mg krill oil.

3
99546d10b3c1774cc4bccf6f275acb40

(176)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:34 PM

I use Ddrops 1000iu liquid "D3" . www.ddrops.ca

I chose this option of the liquid drops because I also give it to my young children. We do "D" shooters. Because d is a fat solulable vitamin I put some half 'n half into a shot class, add one or two drops (or 6-8 for me and DH) and then each child "does" their shot. Lol. I'm also thinking about adding liquid kelp to these shots for their iodine.

I suppose if you are a dairy free paleo practitioner, you could use coconut (or other nut) milk or maybe a tablespoon of EVOO. Its just important to remember to take your "d" with a fat source.

2
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on February 13, 2010
at 01:03 PM

I just found Carlson's Ddrops at Whole Foods, FYI. Each teeny drop is 1,000 IU which is such a nice change from having to swallow tablespoons of oil (cod liver oil, coconut oil...)

2
Cb022c2974328212a7e6c8ea40c621e2

on February 12, 2010
at 10:11 PM

I use 2000 IU Vitamin D3 drops from Carlson. Originally, Amazon had the best price. But now I purchase them here: http://www.vitacost.com/Carlson-Vitamin-D-Drops

The drops are coconut oil based.

1
Da19dae8f2904efb21298b785f5d6cb7

(100)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:22 AM

I take the Life Extension D3 (5000) IU supplement. Things to keep in mind: 1) you want the D3 form. 2) You should get blood tests done to test your D levels - I believe GrassrootsHealth currently is the cheapest source to get this tested.

1
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on February 12, 2010
at 10:54 PM

When looking for the in gelcaps, be sure to check the type of oil that is used. Many brands use soybean oil...too many omega 6s. Look for olive oil as the carrier. This is one http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Vitamin-D-3-Highest-Potency-5-000-IU-240-Softgels/22335?at=0

2ac40062935f569c9a86493f7177d2a0

(233)

on May 24, 2010
at 09:34 PM

Thanks for the note. Saw that my Carlson's D tabs were mixed with sunflower oil. Bought new ones. Aargh.

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 12, 2010
at 10:37 PM

I too went with Vitacost. They ship from Las Vegas. My order took one week to get to Portland, OR. I went with the NSI drops. Olive oil is the carrier. http://www.vitacost.com/NSI-Vitamin-D-Drops

I didn't price shop too hard, but $10 + $5 shipping for 900*2,000 IU seemed hard to beat. I bought some of their vit-K as well, to amortize the shipping.

Note also, there is little reason to buy lesser strength fat soluble vitamins. One can spread the dosage over the course of a few days if the minimum dose size is more than you want to administer on average such as with small children. In other words, 2000IU every other day is equivalent to 1000IU everyday is equivalent to 7000IU every Sunday.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 14, 2010
at 04:26 PM

That said some would argue that it's far better to have a regular intake of vitamin from supplements, rather than very large doses infrequently. Apparantly large fluctuating doses could be worse than a steady, but smaller dose. http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2009/12/vitamin-d-and-uv-fluctuations.html

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:25 PM

Note that if you have non-oil based pills (white, powder-y pills like aspirin) then it's not worth your time. You want D3 which should be oil based.

I have some 5000IU pills like this. Weird, that they don't have the 5000 IU on their site anymore.

0
Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on April 06, 2010
at 11:41 PM

I take Country Life 5000 iu's. They're small softgels. The best thing about them is that they have MCT oil in them, which is an awesome oil, instead of yucky soy. Cheap at iherb.com

0
94401dfe2f2229a8da7037fe76fe61d3

on April 06, 2010
at 11:15 PM

I get mine from Biotech. I take 1 50,000 iu pill a week and get my blood levels drawn periodically. It works out to be incredibly cheap, 100 capsules will last 100 weeks and costs $30. So it's about $15 a year!

0
C4d4a9db7ee3b315eae97795555a1177

(623)

on April 05, 2010
at 09:49 PM

Country Life offers 5,000 IUs and is Gluten, soy, milk, artificial color free. I bought mine at Whole Foods but Im sure you can find them online

0
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on April 05, 2010
at 12:42 PM

Any good European sources for vitamin D ?

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 13, 2010
at 11:52 PM

Aw, we just drove to Mexico for the winter and walk around in the sun for awhile every day! Hope that is good enough.

0
Dbfd016ec2d477a76d7db6c1538f7182

on February 13, 2010
at 02:47 AM

NOW Foods Vitamin D-3 Liquid. 5000iu per dropper/400iu per 4 drops in a base of MCT oil. I love Coconut oil and all its MCT goodness.

0
F0978a2a1c37d2a3d4ec6344c0c4ff82

on February 13, 2010
at 12:33 AM

Bio-Tech Pharmacal is the supplier recommended by the Vitamin D Council for many years now. It is a powder-capsule preparation but it has successfully raised the 25(OH)D3 levels of myself and many others and Dr. John Cannell has vouched for its potency. It is probably the only exception to the "oil-based preparations only" rule for Vitamin D3 supplements that I'm aware of. Their prices are very competitive too. Ships by FedEx. 1,000IU 5,000IU and 50,000IU dosages are available.

0
35dbce347d5ef8a3ffa9fbf5add8732e

on February 12, 2010
at 09:36 PM

My family and I take BLUE ICE Royal™ Butter Oil/Fermented Cod Liver Oil Blend.

The paleo way involves real, whole foods. Get your vitamins the same way.

0
4bb33737d4a4153aa5ec067c3b72e9bb

on February 12, 2010
at 08:38 PM

I've seen a good selection on Amazon and evitamins.com. Evitamins has a nice feature of listing all ingredients, and high quality pictures of the product.

Does anyone have an opinion of D3 supplements using soybean oil vs. soy free?

0
Bc240ea848d8ace7d2c6c4aa595deea3

(20)

on February 12, 2010
at 08:32 PM

A selection of D3 5000 IU available at Amazon.

-1
9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 13, 2010
at 02:18 PM

AT the link below is a photo showing mice of the same age, the one on the left was genetically engineered to have high vitamin D activity.

My recommendation: DON'T take any vitamin D supplements.

If fair skinned people have been under natural selection for optimum UV eposure and vitamin D levels they should feel uncomfortable when these optimum levels are exceeded. You (rightly) trust your body when it tells you "no more sun". Short circuiting this adaptation with an evolutionary unprecedented ingestion of vitamin D 8000IU ( equivalent to 50 ounces of samon!) per day every day is going to damage your health. The relationship of many of these diseases and agingrelated changes in physiology show a U-shaped response curve to serum calcidiol concentrations. In other words: too much is just as bad as too little.

Implicit in the talk of vitamin D insufficiency is that there is a best vitamin D level applicable to everyone and everyone should supplement until it is reached. It just doesn't work that way, levels reached by supplementation do not bring the expected benefits for antioxidant/vitamin supplements. It will take longer for the deleterious effect of vitamin D supplementation to be discovered because it mimics aging and aging is a subtle process. Please don't be listen to benighted amateur nutritionists and supplement sales shills, you'll put your life into fast forward.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 14, 2010
at 03:11 AM

Hey, who can forget the sun-baked prune old-lady stereotype? Is the sun damage from UV to the dermis cells' nucleus, or from too much D? However, suggesting 0 D supplement is not supportable by any facts. I didn't see what an equivalent D dosage the altered mice were experiencing would be, did you? All that study established was a U-shaped response curve which everyone already agrees over. The D Council recommends a max serum D of 80-100 ng/ml. But, what is modern human's sun exposure these days? How much salmon do we eat? By your accounting 1000IU/day is a not unreasonable 6 oz of salmon.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 14, 2010
at 03:14 AM

PS. I tried to vote this down but don't have a 100+ rep. (yet... hint hint ;-)

9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 16, 2010
at 09:16 PM

D supplements will shorten your telomeres and prematurely age your whole body,not just the skin. UV exposure ages skin by a different mechanism than excess D (D by UVB mediated synthesis is strictly limited which should tell you something) The sun that gets through glass (mainly UVA wich does not make D) will age skin. Salmon are obviously not typical fish moreover are only available in quantity during a salmon run. Eating other fish would supply far less. Over a year the Inuit were getting more of their vitamin D from the sun on their face then from fish I think.

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