2

votes

Tribulus terrestris and other herbal supplements...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 11, 2011 at 4:51 PM

I must confess I used to be a sport supplements consumer, but after I became "paleo" (almost two years ago) I left them all, and... Surprise!! My entire sport performance has not decreased but even improved.

Now I've been thinking... Herbal supplements have been used for thousand of years, by definition, it would be part of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

I love to gather all the edible plants and fruits y found when I'm out for a walk on my lovely mediterranean zone, and then use them for cooking or preparing herbal teas... During some of those walks I've found many tribulus terrestris plants, and I've just wondered what would you guys think:

-Would it be acceptable to gather those plants and use them as an herbal supplement? What about any other commercial tribulus supplement??

Aa1d5fbb9d8051538161c9a03afd384e

(226)

on January 15, 2011
at 07:48 AM

Liked your answer! But loved the one in "jacked up testosterone"!! XD

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 14, 2011
at 06:27 PM

See my post in "jacked up testosterone" question.

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6 Answers

best answer

2
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on January 14, 2011
at 10:18 AM

My understanding, having read up quite a bit on Trib, is its beneficial for men underproducing testosterone, but near worthless for men producing average amounts.

as for herbs in general, surely they have been collected by ancestors and used, eastern medicine is very very strong in the use of plants/nature as medicine, as for whether we evolved to use said plant chemical... and the possible side effects of not evolving with it, we would have to get studies done by someone other than the supplement companies.

I personally look for supplements that are also found in whole foods. Then I focus around eating said whole foods. Thus my nutrients are natural and ultimately/most importantly more bioavailable.

Aa1d5fbb9d8051538161c9a03afd384e

(226)

on January 15, 2011
at 07:48 AM

Liked your answer! But loved the one in "jacked up testosterone"!! XD

best answer

1
29f3c0fcd0dd661d8a25f0650d40b4f5

on June 01, 2011
at 06:21 PM

The Chinese and the Indians have been using it for thousands of years, mostly for making tonics to invigorate the human body. The Tribulus Terrestris fruit is a part of treatment for of a variety of health problems connected to the immune system, liver, kidney, and cardiovascular system. The Tribulus Terrestris fruit has antioxidant properties and some studies have been done on the liquid extract of Tribulus Terrestris fruit to establish the facts.

I have been taking it for awhile and it defiantly helps increase mood, boost strength, and defiantly increases your chances of being a gladiator in the bedroom. Boosting testosterone from diet alone is possible, if you went "true paleo", and ate the fatty meats a lot, and not just lean, like cavemen actually did. However we are smarter and understand the problems with high cholesterol. Trib is safe and effective if needed if you are in you mid to late 30's-40's and up and your test levels are down. Younger guys bodies are still pumping it out naturally. If it makes you feel to aggressive and moody, then you levels were probably fine and don't need it. If it makes you feel good and happy and strong like when you were younger, then your levels were probably lower and you benefit from it. check with your primary care physician first, and see what they say. I work in surgery and ran it past many different MD's and my PCP before I started, and got the green light from them. My PCP said it's natural and safe, and you would have to take a lot of it to do any harm long term and is a safe alternative to try first for guys with ED.

Just my two cents on it. I did a lot of checking and research before doing it myself and have had no problems. On a side note, take it with food. On an empty stomach can make you feel a little weird.

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 15, 2011
at 06:31 AM

I don't know that I would do it. Yes, herbs can provide all sorts of benefits. However, there's a couple things to watch out for when using these things for medicinal purposes. They're natural plants, so there's natural variations in the active ingredients. You don't know what you're really getting when you take it. Next, it's in the wild. You don't know what's been sprayed on it in the past, or if there's anything bad leeching in the soil.

That's why the pharmaceutical industry is so big (well asides from all the negative stuff about the "evil" RX companies). They identify the active ingredients, test and standardize the amounts, identify side effects, overdosing symptoms, etc.

1
26f1c6e9fbecc4ac6948f8f395979a81

(503)

on January 15, 2011
at 02:25 AM

From my understanding, Trib has an impact on luteinizing hormone. It stimulates the Leydig cell production of testosterone. However, messing with your body's normal levels can foul up the natural production of T so that you no longer produce a decent level without the artificial help. Stick with good food and exercise which naturally stimulates testosterone and growth hormone production.

1
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 14, 2011
at 06:02 PM

FWIW, I have personally tried Tribulus Terrestris and if made me feel foul. I only took for about a week and then returned it. I remember the symptons as having an increased heart rate and had difficulty sleeping.

0
Medium avatar

on January 14, 2011
at 07:33 PM

Personally, I have a hard time believing that an herbal supplement could have a positive effect on overall health unless it contained a particular nutrient that you happened to be deficient in. The pharm/supp magic pill syndrome seems to me to be the wrong approach to health, even if you are picking the sources wild.

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