2

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Time of day for supplements

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 14, 2010 at 11:56 AM

Is it better to take supplements (fish oil, coconut oil, D3, multi-vitamin, calcium/magnesium, etc.) in the morning or evening? Or are specific supps better at different times? Magnesium, for example, is supposed to help with sleep, while coconut oil can be stimulating.

61f4f65bb54c2a34c37f94259be2a488

on March 02, 2010
at 04:15 AM

In addition, supplements in modern times can be absolutely critical to health. Vitamin D3, Fish oil (EPA/DHA), Vitamin K2 (MK-4/MK-7), and possibly Mangnesium are almost mandatory for the vast majority of the people who practice paleo but still don't get much sunshine, and eat conventional muscle meat.

61f4f65bb54c2a34c37f94259be2a488

on March 02, 2010
at 04:12 AM

This is absolute hogwash... Care to provide evidence to your statement: "It's not a good idea to have lipids circulating when you are asleep."? IIRC the most common eating pattern of hunter gatherers is 1 big meal a day at night time (and without artificial light you can bet they are going to sleep not long after) and if there is a second meal it is late morning/lunch and it is smaller than the dinner time meal.

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5 Answers

4
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on February 14, 2010
at 06:53 PM

You should limit your supplements to substances that are difficult to obtain in adequate amounts from your diet, such as vitamins D and K2, or that address a specific health problem, such as niacin for dyslipidemia. Most supplements are absorbed better with food. I take my supplements with the first meal of the day, for the sake of convenience, and because I may not remember to take them later. Vitamin D3 may be taken weekly, if that is more convenient for you.

2
97af1caf30f029165abc783a20349c9f

(510)

on February 14, 2010
at 12:41 PM

Each supplement acts quiete different. Most important are the interactions between them. Also bear in mind antagonists often found in food/medicine. Typical are: phytic acid, coffein, alcohol, dairy/calcium, grapefruit and lots more. Check always your medication leaflet. To bookmark: some are lovers, some enemies and some strangers just passing by. E.g.: Most significant example of vitamin action on mineral metabolism is vitamin D in calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Also the interrelationship of vitamin C and iron. Vitamin E and its interaction with selenium. And the interaction existing between vitamin A and zinc. For best timing with interactions in mind I would prefer vitamin D before noon, calcium afternoon, magnesium in the evening. If you really feel a energy boost via coconut fat eating it latest with lunch would be of course best. Never heard about EPA/DHA timing. If there is some GI issue take it with your main meal. Multivitamin even better than nothing counteracts most of its impact because of the interactions/antagonism as mentioned; e.g. vitamin A and Vitamin D. Iron is a typical loner.

1
61f4f65bb54c2a34c37f94259be2a488

on March 02, 2010
at 04:19 AM

I follow this advice when taking my handful of supplements (Vitamin D3, Vitamin K2 (MK-4 & MK-7), Fish Oil/Krill Oil, Magnesium):

General recommendations for nutritional supplementation: To avoid stomach problems and promote better tolerance, supplements should always be taken earlier, or in the middle of a larger meal. When taken on an empty stomach or after a meal, there is a greater risk of some tablets causing irritation, or eventually erosion of the esophageal sphincter, resulting in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). It is also advisable not to lie down immediately after taking any pills. When taking a very large daily amount of a single nutrient, it is better to split it up into smaller doses to not interfere with the absorption of other nutrients in food, or nutrients supplemented at lower amounts.

1
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 14, 2010
at 12:30 PM

Vitamin D and A in the morning because otherwise they can cause insomnia (as you'd expect for a daylight nutrient). Most supplements are better with a meal for digestion (especially a fatty meal, for omega 3 or fat soluble vitamins). Magnesium is good for relaxation and sleep, but I don't know that it helps sleep at the time you take it especially. Magnesium is so central that the body tends to keep blood levels rock steady, unlike, say b-vitamins or vitamin C. Just having enough magnesium in the diet generally would be the important thing I'd think. Magnesium supplements, esp magnesium oxide can interfere with digestion so I would have thought that you might not want to take them with a heavy meal, since they can have anti-acid effects (hence milk of magnesia).

Coconut will give you a quick boost of energy, but suppose it's subjective whether that stops you sleeping. I like to avoid having a big meal of protein shortly before bed, because I find that it gives me a burst of energy and heat a few hours later when it's broken down, so prefer it earlier in the day.

-1
9a9e783b852d7d39f933f5fe31f6ae61

(22)

on February 14, 2010
at 05:33 PM

I don't think you should be taking any supplements.

Bearing that in mind, if you must take supplemention it should enter the blood in a way than mimics as closely as possible the digestion of food; take very moderate amounts and take them with meals; the heaviest meal should be eaten close to midday. It's not a good idea to have lipids circulating when you are asleep.

61f4f65bb54c2a34c37f94259be2a488

on March 02, 2010
at 04:15 AM

In addition, supplements in modern times can be absolutely critical to health. Vitamin D3, Fish oil (EPA/DHA), Vitamin K2 (MK-4/MK-7), and possibly Mangnesium are almost mandatory for the vast majority of the people who practice paleo but still don't get much sunshine, and eat conventional muscle meat.

61f4f65bb54c2a34c37f94259be2a488

on March 02, 2010
at 04:12 AM

This is absolute hogwash... Care to provide evidence to your statement: "It's not a good idea to have lipids circulating when you are asleep."? IIRC the most common eating pattern of hunter gatherers is 1 big meal a day at night time (and without artificial light you can bet they are going to sleep not long after) and if there is a second meal it is late morning/lunch and it is smaller than the dinner time meal.

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