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Should you avoid liver in the winter if not supplementing with Vit D?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 16, 2010 at 6:13 AM

Based on the following quotes in a WAPF article titled Vitamin A On Trial: Does Vitamin A Cause Osteoporosis?...

Eating whole foods, however, is not enough. The so-called "primitives" studied by Weston Price had adapted complete diets and lifestyles to suit their needs. Foods rich in one nutrient and poor in another were combined together into a diet that, as a whole, yielded the high amounts of minerals and vitamins that Price documented. Thus, the finding that subjects in the Nurses' Health Study who regularly ate liver - a traditional whole food - had an increased risk for fracture is actually consistent with Price's findings. By itself, liver from land animals, especially ruminants like cattle and lamb, is very rich in vitamin A,64 while livers from both ruminants and poultry animals have only about 12 IU of vitamin D for every 100 grams.

and

... liver from land animals should either be used during seasons where the supply of UV-B rays from the sun is rich enough to guarantee adequate vitamin D, or in conjunction with vitamin D-rich foods such as lard from pastured pigs, oily fish, shellfish, and egg yolks from pastured chickens, all of which supply smaller but substantial amounts of vitamin D.

If you feel that you're not getting large amounts of Vitamin D through your diet (and are not supplementing with Vitamin D - just looking at it through a whole food / diet standpoint), should you consider not eating liver in the winter months?

Or should it still be considered beneficial, say once a week, as a sort of whole food multi-vitamin due to it being such a nutrient dense food? (beef, grass-fed, organic)

F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on March 17, 2011
at 07:01 PM

At least 10:1 or better (9:1, 8:1, etc.). And that's real vitamin A, not the carotenes. I wouldn't count the carotenes in my A intake at all unless you know for a fact you're converting them. Some people don't.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 16, 2010
at 07:16 PM

Exactly. Beware of epidemiolical studies. They are just data mining after the fact and guess as to cause. I do agree that vit D may be the confounder here, but there could be others, like poor people eating more liver than wealthy people (cuz liver is cheap)

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5 Answers

2
8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on December 16, 2010
at 12:28 PM

I think this is like asking "Should you drive slower if you don't drive with your eyes open?".

The answer is "You should drive with your eyes open." :-)

1
Ba226c77a1bb6b893a8b9eb904764227

(10)

on December 16, 2010
at 04:38 PM

i AGREE WITH wjones in that the statistics could mean anything including that the people who ate liver regularly were far more active than those who did not and thus, as elderly people, took more falls than the elderly people who did not eat liver and had no energy to get out of bed.

1
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on December 16, 2010
at 02:51 PM

I am extremely skeptical of anything in that "Nurses' Health" study. The "analysis" of the data here reminds me of the China Study. A scattershot statistical analysis reveals correlations between ... liver consumption and fractures. Interesting starting point for a controlled study (which will never happen, most likely). By itself, utterly meaningless.

My advice: 1. Eat liver (once or twice a week) 2. Supplement with vitamin D (at least in winter)

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on December 16, 2010
at 07:16 PM

Exactly. Beware of epidemiolical studies. They are just data mining after the fact and guess as to cause. I do agree that vit D may be the confounder here, but there could be others, like poor people eating more liver than wealthy people (cuz liver is cheap)

0
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on December 16, 2010
at 04:01 PM

Take your vitamin D.

0
5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on December 16, 2010
at 02:04 PM

i'd say it's not beneficial to only eat liver and not supplement D - exactly for the reason you stated. from what i heard, the proper ratio (still speculative) should be around 4:1 (A:D)

F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on March 17, 2011
at 07:01 PM

At least 10:1 or better (9:1, 8:1, etc.). And that's real vitamin A, not the carotenes. I wouldn't count the carotenes in my A intake at all unless you know for a fact you're converting them. Some people don't.

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