0

votes

Should fluoride supplements be used if your water isn't fluoridated?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 15, 2010 at 3:05 PM

In some locales where fluoride is not in the water supply, oral supplements are provided as an alternative to help with cavity prevention. I also read that they apparently have never been approved by the FDA (though this may not really be pertinent).

Add05b2aaf5629dcd0d26096ce26627b

(110)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:49 PM

@Travis: It doesn't seem to be just the K2 in the butter oil, as I developed problems with my teeth when I wasn't taking the butter oil (due to a dairy-free month) but was still taking K2. Those problems (pain in a back molar) resolved when I resumed taking butter oil. I've had similar results from stopping cod liver oil for a month.

03a6c28d6f614af51b112ffb2fbb073b

on February 13, 2011
at 09:09 PM

The food pyramid is a "product" of the USDA - United States Department of Agriculture.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on February 08, 2011
at 01:16 AM

I don't think stevia is a suitable sweetener. IMO Xylitol is FAR better with proven benefits for the teeth. See this: http://www.xylitol.org/dental-benefits-of-xylitol You can even just brush with it and it's also good as a mouthwash. The other reservation with baking soda is it can cause gum recession after a while.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on February 07, 2011
at 11:58 PM

thanks and yes, I will be buying peppermint oil soon. Never thought about stevia powder. I'm wondering if I can make good amount of baking soda + peppermint oil ahead of time to store for convenience.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 07, 2011
at 10:20 PM

Just mix a little essential oil of peppermint, "to taste" as they say, into your dentifice. If your kids want the sweet taste that they are used to from industrial toothpaste, mix in some refined (white) stevia powder "to taste". The mixture won't taste exactly like industrial toothpaste, but the e.o. of peppermint and stevia ought to mask most of the baking soda taste.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 07, 2011
at 07:11 PM

Something to be aware of is that the fluoride content in tea has greatly increased in the past few decades. I tried for a while to hunt down the content in white tea, but the best I found was that it was "probably a lot less" due to the fact that the leaves are younger.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2011
at 07:04 PM

I drink organic white tea so I know I am consuming "some" fluoride. Whether or not the natural kind I don't know. Hope I'm not poisoning myself too badly = (

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:59 PM

It's the K2 in the butter oil.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Photo of somewhat mild fluoride damage, still noticeable.... http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3sMh31VZHMc/TSelt5DiKNI/AAAAAAAADFc/kaVIcCOQzBg/s1600/Flouride_Spotted_Teeth.jpg

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 17, 2010
at 12:46 AM

@David -- check out http://www.fdareview.org/

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 17, 2010
at 12:45 AM

@Diana - I too witnessed massive (!) improvement in dental health after eating Paleo/hyper-lipid as well as supplementing with butter oil and cod liver oil. What are your thoughts on alleged Vitamin A toxicity? See here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/1096/cod-liver-oil-and-vitamin-a-are-toxic

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on March 16, 2010
at 01:32 PM

Good point, I'll go ahead and revise the question so it's a little more relevant.

5cd18bfcafadc56292971e59f2f1faf6

(2475)

on March 16, 2010
at 03:17 AM

Oh, I should add -- I wasn't the down vote. I actually up-voted because I think the question is interesting even though the FDA thing is irrelevant.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on March 16, 2010
at 12:36 AM

Fluoride is a medication available by prescription. It's also available in some bottled waters. Whether you call it a "supplement" or not is a matter of law and semantics. The American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) both recommend fluoride supplementation up to the age of 16 years if the water supply does not contain fluoride ( http://www.ada.org/public/topics/fluoride/fluoride_article01.asp#dosage ). People are free to follow or ignore this recommendation.

5cd18bfcafadc56292971e59f2f1faf6

(2475)

on March 15, 2010
at 09:38 PM

The FDA doesn't approve supplements. Supplements are considered dietary items and not drugs so the FDA's only power is to ban supplements that it considers unsafe (as it did with ephedra a few years ago). Vitamin D, magnesium, fish oil, whey protein, and so on have never been approved by the FDA either.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on March 15, 2010
at 05:51 PM

Valid point. I'm not really much of a fan of the FDA.

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on March 15, 2010
at 05:49 PM

Well, I kinda wanted to call attention to the fact that some people give oral fluoride supplements to children. I had never heard of this before, and it sounds ridiculous.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 15, 2010
at 04:19 PM

If you want fluoride, brush your teeth with fluoridated toothpaste. There is no reason to ingest it on purpose. Please see the discussion on fluoridated drinking water: http://paleohacks.com/questions/2005/is-fluoridated-water-safe-for-everyday-drinking

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 15, 2010
at 04:17 PM

If you want fluoride, brush your teeth. There is no reason to ingest it on purpose. please see the discussion on fluoridated drinking water: http://paleohacks.com/questions/2005/is-fluoridated-water-safe-for-everyday-drinking

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on March 15, 2010
at 03:44 PM

Really, a negative vote? LOL, a comment explaining why the question isn't helpful or valid would be useful.

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8 Answers

7
Add05b2aaf5629dcd0d26096ce26627b

on March 17, 2010
at 12:30 AM

For as long as I can remember, I've had terrible problems with my teeth and gums. I had new cavities with every set of x-rays, plus chronically inflamed gums. Notably, that was with a dental cleaning every 3 months, plus prescription-strength fluoride toothpaste.

I experienced some improvement when I began eating paleo nearly two years ago. But I saw dramatic changes when I began supplementing with cod liver oil and butter oil. My teeth felt clean all day. They formed a new layer of calcification. My gums became normal. I had no new cavities with my last set of x-rays. I stopped using the high-fluoride toothpaste around the same time. Now I'm brushing with baking soda -- or just water.

My conclusion? That fluoride didn't do much -- if anything -- to promote my dental health. Cod liver oil and butter oil made a huge difference.

Also, from what I've read, fluoride interferes with thyroid function. Like bromine, it takes the place of iodine in the body without serving its function. So if you're not getting sufficient iodine -- and most people aren't -- fluoride can cause problems. (I don't know if fluoride was a factor in the development of my own hypothyroidism.)

I'd say: Ditch the fluoride toothpaste, try supplementing with cod liver oil and butter oil. See what happens.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 17, 2010
at 12:45 AM

@Diana - I too witnessed massive (!) improvement in dental health after eating Paleo/hyper-lipid as well as supplementing with butter oil and cod liver oil. What are your thoughts on alleged Vitamin A toxicity? See here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/1096/cod-liver-oil-and-vitamin-a-are-toxic

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:59 PM

It's the K2 in the butter oil.

Add05b2aaf5629dcd0d26096ce26627b

(110)

on March 01, 2011
at 08:49 PM

@Travis: It doesn't seem to be just the K2 in the butter oil, as I developed problems with my teeth when I wasn't taking the butter oil (due to a dairy-free month) but was still taking K2. Those problems (pain in a back molar) resolved when I resumed taking butter oil. I've had similar results from stopping cod liver oil for a month.

5
6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on March 15, 2010
at 05:39 PM

Well, I wouldn't look to the FDA as a final arbiter on anything. Aren't they the dopes that give us the insane food pyramid?

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on March 17, 2010
at 12:46 AM

@David -- check out http://www.fdareview.org/

65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

(6092)

on March 15, 2010
at 05:51 PM

Valid point. I'm not really much of a fan of the FDA.

03a6c28d6f614af51b112ffb2fbb073b

on February 13, 2011
at 09:09 PM

The food pyramid is a "product" of the USDA - United States Department of Agriculture.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:10 PM

There's no evidence that says we need fluoride for healthy teeth, it can actually cause fluorosis.

Some of you may even realize you have some fluoride damage. I don't drink tap water anymore, and I really disagree with how fluoride isn't much of an option. Unless you buy a filter but you have to get a good one that removes all fluoride. But that's another post of its own.

An interesting photo I found at a forum where the discussion is about fluoride: http://oneworldscam.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/sodium-fluoride-insecticide-poison.jpg

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Photo of somewhat mild fluoride damage, still noticeable.... http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3sMh31VZHMc/TSelt5DiKNI/AAAAAAAADFc/kaVIcCOQzBg/s1600/Flouride_Spotted_Teeth.jpg

2
65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

on March 16, 2010
at 01:41 PM

From Fluoride Alert:

As pointed out by a growing number of dental researchers, fluoride supplements are unnecessary, ineffective, and much more likely to give your child dental fluorosis than to spare them a cavity.

Fluoride Supplements are Unnecessary: A vast body of dental research now indicates that there is no need to swallow fluoride at all - whether at a young or old age. This is because fluoride's purported 'benefit' to teeth comes primarily from topical application, and not from ingestion. Thus, fluoride supplements - which were developed in the 1950s under the incorrect assumption that fluoride needed to be swallowed - unnecessarily expose a child to systemic fluoride.

Fluoride Supplements are Ineffective: According to a recent review in the dental journal Community Dentistry & Oral Epidemiology:

"The basis for the widespread acceptance of fluoride supplements in caries prevention is a large number of mostly small clinical trials in the late 1950's and 1960's. The early studies have been reviewed again recently in a series of publications and they have again been criticised. The criticisms are serious and virtually none of the early fluoride supplement studies would be published today, because of methodological and other shortcomings. They present conclusions that are not supported by their data or consistent with their designs.... the evidence in support of the effectiveness of fluoride supplements is poor. The benefits claimed for fluoride supplements are, in any case, available through regular toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste and fairly minor and sensible lifestyle changes."

Fluoride Supplements Place a Child at High Risk for Fluorosis: About 30-45% of children receiving fluoride supplements develop dental fluorosis. As noted by Dr. Paul Riordan: "Supplement use by children younger than 5 years entails a risk of fluorosis which, at the community level, becomes a certainty."

2
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on March 15, 2010
at 05:53 PM

Ingesting fluoride only has potential benefit during the formation of teeth, which is completed by 14 to 16 years of age. If you are over 16 years of age, there are no dental or medical organizations I know of that recommend ingesting fluoride. Stick with vitamin D3 and K2 supplements.

1
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 07, 2011
at 07:29 PM

If anyone wants the whole story on why fluoride was put into water supplies you simply must read The Fluoride Deception by Christopher Bryson. Hint: its all about the quest for The Bomb. The Fluoride Deception is extremely well researched and has extensive footnotes, so anyone can confirm its findings on their own, plus it is an absolutely riveting read to boot. I have no connection to the author or publisher or anything like that.

1
Medium avatar

on February 07, 2011
at 07:01 PM

The closest someone should come to supplementing with fluoride is using green tea as a mouthwash and then spitting it out. It's packed with fluoride.

Really though, a K2 supplement makes the biggest difference.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 07, 2011
at 07:11 PM

Something to be aware of is that the fluoride content in tea has greatly increased in the past few decades. I tried for a while to hunt down the content in white tea, but the best I found was that it was "probably a lot less" due to the fact that the leaves are younger.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 07, 2011
at 07:04 PM

I drink organic white tea so I know I am consuming "some" fluoride. Whether or not the natural kind I don't know. Hope I'm not poisoning myself too badly = (

0
Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on February 07, 2011
at 06:52 PM

I stopped giving my children doctor prescribed flouride supplementation when our insurance didn't cover it. I was worried at first that I was doing my children a disservice and ultimately allowing preventable damage to their teeth. That was eight years ago. Non of my children have cavities - even with having braces.

I've stopped using fluoride toothpaste and use baking soda and coconut oil. I haven't convince all my children or husband to switch yet, though. I may have to come up with a better tasting recipe for homemade toothpaste.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 07, 2011
at 10:20 PM

Just mix a little essential oil of peppermint, "to taste" as they say, into your dentifice. If your kids want the sweet taste that they are used to from industrial toothpaste, mix in some refined (white) stevia powder "to taste". The mixture won't taste exactly like industrial toothpaste, but the e.o. of peppermint and stevia ought to mask most of the baking soda taste.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on February 07, 2011
at 11:58 PM

thanks and yes, I will be buying peppermint oil soon. Never thought about stevia powder. I'm wondering if I can make good amount of baking soda + peppermint oil ahead of time to store for convenience.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on February 08, 2011
at 01:16 AM

I don't think stevia is a suitable sweetener. IMO Xylitol is FAR better with proven benefits for the teeth. See this: http://www.xylitol.org/dental-benefits-of-xylitol You can even just brush with it and it's also good as a mouthwash. The other reservation with baking soda is it can cause gum recession after a while.

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